Latest Comments by emly

emly 1,608 Views

Joined Nov 12, '09. Posts: 12 (0% Liked)

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    Hi,I'm an RN with a few mos of experience. I work in postpartum at a big, busy hospital (3PP floors) in Chicago. I'd like to move to Seattle after I wrap up a year here. My goal is to transfer to one of two types of OB units: (1) a more hollistic, midwifery driven unit or (2) a smaller OB unit where RNs are cross trained (AP/L&D/PP). There are very few (if any) hollistic birthing centers in Chicago, but there are a few hospitals with units like that crosstrain and cross staff, some even send nurses to NICU and peds floors. I would enjoy - to be able to get a breadth of experience. I'm also considering going back to school for a midwifery/DNP program. They have a combined program here, but I don't see myself staying in Chicago for the five years it would take to enroll and complete it. Does anyone know of similar programs in Seattle?Lastly, can you tell me on average what nurses w/ 1yr of experience make in WA? Here it's ~26/hr w/ $5 shift pm diff & $2 weekend ($7 weekend night).Thanks!

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    Loyola was bought by Trinity, I don't think they'll have a name change. A lot of my classmates had clinicals there and enjoyed all of their rotations. They're not known for hiring Loyola grads, or new grads in general really... but that doesn't mean they don't hire. I haven't heard anything about their new grad program. (Didn't know they had one.)

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    What Juli said - you'll be fine. Chicago rent will run you between $700 and $1500 for a 1BR, depending on where you live. Realistically, expect to pay closer to $900 for a one bedroom. Logan Square, Lincoln Square and West Town/Noble Square are pretty good price:value/location (also a little more diverse than Lincoln Park, Gold Coast, etc). Like Juli, I moved here w/ a starting salary of $27K, but that was 11 years ago and everything's a little more expensive. If you have a roommate, even easier.

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    I think it's opening up a little, but definitely better for BSN than ADN. I looked at Alexian Bros jobs the other day and just about all of their positions require 2-3yrs of experience, w/ very few exceptions.

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    They don't care where you take courses, just get good grades. I just graduated from Loyola's ABSN and I took all of my prereqs at community colleges. I'd recommend Wilbur Wright over Truman if you can. I also took a couple courses at Oakton CC and had great profs there.

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    I'm in the cohort that graduates in May 2012. I got in w/ a 3.0 cum gpa, but a 4.0 prereq gpa... and my low grades were from over 11 years ago, so I think they based my acceptance on essay and life experience. Doing okay in the program so far...

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    I don't know about actual gpa rqmts, but based on the people I know who got into programs... I'd say Chamberlain is easy, and perhaps North Park University.

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    Hi there,

    I'm looking for some hints for those of you with some hospital experience under your belts. I've been completing prerequisites to apply to BSN / master's-entry nursing programs that begin in the spring and fall. I completed a CNA class this summer and I passed the state certification test, and would like to begin working as a CNA at a hospital for some experience before I begin a nursing degree.

    I've applied to Rush Oak Park and they gave me a call to set up an interview. These are my questions, some are Rush specific - some are just general hospital-related questions.

    - Since I haven't worked at a hospital, I'm not really clear on what a registry position is. I understand this registry pool is run through the hospital rather than an outside agency, and that I'm to give them my availability and they'll schedule me intermittently as they need me. I've read that most registry positions have no benefits. I'll be quitting a low-pay (minimum wage + ~ $2/hr in tips), albeit insured job. I believe that there's a minimum of 20 hours per pay period (10 hours per week), should I begin by offering a few hours and then increasing them - or is widespread availability a more valuable asset to hospitals?

    - Does anyone know approximately what Rush Oak Park registry CNA position pays? (I was guessing around $12/hour, but I don't want to be grossly off - since I'll be quitting a 20-30hr/wk job for significantly fewer hours and no benefits.)

    - How much in advance are you scheduled? Can you make changes to your regular availability?

    - Do people advance from registry to part-time employment?

    - What is the environment like at Rush Oak Park?

    - Since I'm a new CNA (clearly stated in my cover letter and application), can I expect any training? Is it appropriate for me to ask about training opportunities? Will I be moving from department to department? If so, are the same CNA duties applicable in one department and another?

    - Any hints for someone with no healthcare background in a first time interview?

    - Can registry positions be put on hold? I don't anticipate having any difficulty in fulfilling my agreement, but depending on the program I'm accepted to, I might need to put my registry availability on hold for one or two semesters. I realize this might be a Rush Oak Park specific question... but is this something I should broach during the initial interview - or just really strive for the job and then ask questions in 6 months when I have some experience and it's more relevant?

    - Are hospital standards for CNAs significantly higher than longterm care facilities? Our course didn't cover a lot of short-term/hospital type patient care, but I do still have the book and can read up on it. Does anyone have any additional tips?

    Thanks so much,
    Emily

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    Hi all,

    I've finally made a decision to move towards an ADN, and I'm going to put all of my effort into applying to either Oakton or Harper. I'm at Oakton now, taking my prerequisites. I really like the campus and the professors that I have there, and I've heard good things about there nursing program, but I'm not so blown away by their nursing curriculum. The curriculum doesn't differentiate between lecture and clinical, and it has about 7 less hours (based on the prereqs I will have taken) than Harper.

    Meanwhile, I really like Harper's curriculum, which is clearly defined, and on average 3 lecture/3 clinical per semester (with a few extra classes added in).

    I will have to change residency to be considered at either location. From what I've read it seems much easier to be accepted into Harper while living out of district, and Oakton's spring cohort is half the size of their Fall cohort - whereas they are equal sizes at Harper.

    If anyone at either school can weigh in on the program, I'd really appreciate it.

    Thanks,
    Emily

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    Should you opt for the package handling position, I have some tips for the drive. (I'm finishing up pre-reqs for nursing school and I drive four days a week to a college between 30minutes to an hour away, depending on traffic.) I bought a $40 digital recorder and tape lectures. On the drive back and forth between home/work/school, I replay lectures in the car. Or before tests, I sometimes read important material aloud and record it, then listen to the recording on my way in. (Trying to teach myself on tape, basically.) It's helped me utilize some time that would otherwise be lost in commute.

    Good luck! I'd personally opt for the PCT.

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    Triton has only one registration period - January, I believe. From that pool of candidates they select the fall (of the same year) and spring (of the following year) students. In addition, you have to have all of your prerequisites completed. I'm starting my prereqs this summer, in the hopes of completing them this summer, and the earliest I could be accepted at Triton is Fall 2011, because the next registration will be Jan 2011. Disappointing, but a LOT of the community colleges either have just one start semester or one registration date.

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    Hi there,

    This thread is shockingly relevant, right down to the possible college options and Truman, where I'm planning on doing some prereq work...

    Since you both mentioned Truman, I thought I'd give it a shot and ask what your experiences were there: I'm trying to get straight into Bio 226, to avoid the basic intro Bio... I've been out of school for ten years, and my last bio was in '96 (freshman year of college), so I'm a little nervous about having to do THREE semesters of pre req work instead of the two that I was expecting... Any idea how tough the department chair is, or how hard the actual Bio 226/227 are?

    If you've started your programs, do you feel well-prepared?

    And lastly, how hard is organic chem at Truman? I might try to do it during a summer session (if avail) to keep my prereqs to a year, but every story I've ever heard about OC is a nightmare...

    Any advice?

    Thanks,
    Emly



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