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newboy, MSN, RN 5,570 Views

Joined Oct 2, '09 - from 'Eastside USA'. newboy is a Psychiatric RN. He has '5' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Mental Health Nursing'. Posts: 391 (67% Liked) Likes: 1,203

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  • Nov 3

    Quote from momofm1998
    And sadly, many students are not particuarly interested in nursing, just a good steady paycheck.
    So? Not every nurse has to be Florence Nightingale. Many people choose careers for financial stability, but that doesn't make them incompetent or bad at their jobs.

  • Oct 25

    Quote from momofm1998
    And sadly, many students are not particuarly interested in nursing, just a good steady paycheck.
    So? Not every nurse has to be Florence Nightingale. Many people choose careers for financial stability, but that doesn't make them incompetent or bad at their jobs.

  • Oct 25

    Quote from momofm1998
    And sadly, many students are not particuarly interested in nursing, just a good steady paycheck.
    So? Not every nurse has to be Florence Nightingale. Many people choose careers for financial stability, but that doesn't make them incompetent or bad at their jobs.

  • Oct 25

    Quote from momofm1998
    And sadly, many students are not particuarly interested in nursing, just a good steady paycheck.
    So? Not every nurse has to be Florence Nightingale. Many people choose careers for financial stability, but that doesn't make them incompetent or bad at their jobs.

  • Oct 25

    Quote from momofm1998
    And sadly, many students are not particuarly interested in nursing, just a good steady paycheck.
    So? Not every nurse has to be Florence Nightingale. Many people choose careers for financial stability, but that doesn't make them incompetent or bad at their jobs.

  • Aug 13

    As the other posters have stated, take the post-acute job. It's easier to transition into another job if you have experience AND you're actively working.

  • May 5

    Quote from shmedium
    I was recently fired from my job as a PCT. A nurse asked me if I could perform a particular task. I told her I wasn't sure, I called the supervisor and asked if I am permitted to do this. She asked if I had been taught it in nursing school. I indicated that I was. She said that the nurse can, then, delegate that task to me. I did it and was fired about a month after. This occurred in the state of Ohio, where the law is clear that the RN is responsible for accurate delegation and is to be who is held accountable for improper delegation. The task was inserting an NG tube. The procedure went smoothly and no harm was done. I have never been written up before, never even been late. The RN I was working for and the supervisor both said to do it. I rely on their knowledge to know how to do my job. I feel like I am a patsy.
    The RN should have been fired too. You both were accountable.

  • May 4

    Quote from Octocaesar
    Technology can be harnessed to improve learning. But online courses are just...insufficient. There are things you learn just by stepping your foot in the campus. Even how long it takes for you to get ready for school builds your time management skills. These tiny little things make a big difference in character building. If I am the employer, I would want to hire "brick-and-mortar" kind of workers, not because I want to bully anyone but because it is my right to protect my investment.
    Let's hope you're never an "employer" then. While employers can hire anyone they see fit based on their own beliefs, I see so much fault in that. Everyone is different. I actually think it takes a dedicated, hard-worker to get through an online program. If I'm eventually the hiring manager, NM, or CNO of a facility, I would hope I don't select nurses based on bias and unproven beliefs.

  • Apr 15

    Quote from OrganizedChaos
    He just didn't understand that if I got drug tested I could lose my license.
    Ever go to the grocery store and had to pray and pay - that is, pray that you'll have enough to pay for your groceries. Well, same concept just that you pray you don't get drug tested until it's out of your system lol.

  • Mar 25

    Wait, wait, wait... what? Is this serious? And then it says she received a distraction-free environment AND extra time on an exam and STILL felt like her professor didn't do enough to help her pass. What's next? She's going to sue a coding patient for not giving her enough time to prepare. SMH.

  • Mar 13

    I'm a new grad charge nurse in a LTC facility. I've been there for almost 2 months and I'm at the point where I'm literally scared to go to work. At first I floated, and that was ok, but I just became a regular on a dementia/psych floor. The paperwork and charting is sooo heavy, and I'm the only nurse on a 40-bed unit. I know I have to "manage my time" more effectively, but there's not enough time in one 8 hr shift to do everything that is required of me.. and i don't take lunch.

    I have to pass meds (and the time schedules of the meds are so crazy), start tube feedings, supervise CNAs, chart, pick up orders, check orders, treatments, and various other paper work that come in books.. and the worst of all is getting an admission.. i always fear that i'll get an admission .. and on top of all that, i JUST learned that i'm required to re-do the whole treatment book for the new month.. and my god, the daily interruptions i get.. supervisors coming every 5 mins to check the medex while i'm giving meds, CNAs calling me for this and that, residents not wanting to take their meds (i have to spend so much time just to encourage them to do so).

    I don't want to quit because I want to be able to handle everything, and I've floated to every floor to know that other floors are easier to handle; still hard, but a little easier. I just don't believe one nurse can do it all safely.

  • Feb 15

    Quote from BCgradnurse
    What do you mean by a "down and dirty" RN program? Our RN portion of the program was the same as any ADN program (I do not have a BSN). We had to have the basic science pre-reqs (A+P, chemistry, micro, etc) finished before we could even apply to the DE program. We all had at least a Bachelors in another discipline, so we didn't have to take any of the Gen Ed courses. We took Health Assessment, Theory, Patho, Pharm, Ethics, Research, etc. and did the same number of clinical hours and synthesis as the undergrad BSN students. We took NCLEX after all of those requirements were completed, just like any other RN student.

    I don't feel like I started "further behind" as an NP because I didn't work as an RN. To be honest, I use very little of what I learned in the RN part of my program. I'm not saying it wasn't valuable and necessary, but most of it isn't relevant to what I do on a daily basis.
    Thank you for coming and sharing your experience . It really helps to see the other side of things realistically rather than just talk about it theoretically. I know that DE programs only accept the best of the best and it sounds like your program molded you into a confident and competent NP.

  • Feb 15

    Quote from MunoRN
    Is it possible to summarize the findings (I don't have a Lippincott log-in).
    Sure thing. The article found a negative correlation between years of RN experience and NP clinical practice skills based on assessment by collaborating physicians. Also longer RN experience was related to lower rankings of NP skills. The article brings forth the issue that the more one is a RN, the more one THINKS like a RN, even when the thinking changes in the advanced practice role.

    Keep in mind that this is only one article, though. And there were many limitations to the study. Also, this study could have suffered from major bias based on the individuals who did or didn't respond.

  • Feb 15

    Quote from Jules A
    I am so appreciative for all the participation! I wish NewBoy wasn't the only one with the cojones to add an opposing view because even though overall I am convinced of my assertions there is much value in considering other views especially because we can probably all agree this is not going away. Perhaps now is the time to come up with and lobby for additions to all NP programs that will ensure a better quality product?
    Lol I'm just being realistic, Jules. Things won't change just because people think it SHOULD happen based on their own experiences. Arguing that NPs with prior RN experience are better is just a matter of opinion, and a very generalized one I might add. If you go looking for a problem, you're going to find one - even if there's no problem to be found. The only way things will change is if research actually demonstrated that direct entry graduates weren't prepared enough, and patient outcomes suffered because of it. I believe research DOES exist that shows there is no difference in care provided between direct entry NPs and NPs with prior RN experience.

    Im not against gaining RN experience before going into NP school; I'm against mandating it. If nurses feel NP schools aren't preparing them enough, then fight for better curriculums and a better care model in NP schools. The average program is already 3 years long, so why not one more year of sciences that are actually needed? In all honesty, I think the biggest fight should be for NP residencies.

    Experience is not the same for everyone, and everyone won't get the same "gut" feeling you do out of it. If you want better NPs, something has to be done at the NP educational level.

    Lastly, I think everyone is making a mountain out of a molehill. There are only a few direct entry programs (most of which are at prestigious institutions) and their admission requirements are brutal. They take the best of the best. There are no direct entry mills.

  • Feb 15

    Quote from daynuh
    I think that it is borderline irresponsible to go into NP school minimal or no experience. Personally, I would want at least 2 or 3 years of working at the beside before I would even consider something like NP school. I'm glad I'm not the only one that feels this way.
    Why is it irresponsible? Again, I see a whole lot of people wanting change for something that's not even a problem. If patient safety was an issue, those direct entry programs would be shut down. I'm sorry, but I have to play devil's advocate here. You can't effect change based on what you personally think or feel, because it's nothing more than an opinion (not just you, I'm talking in general). I see a whole lot of cries with no supporting evidence to back up with you and other posters are claiming as problematic for the NP profession.


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