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tntrn 16,274 Views

I am happily retired after 35 years of Labor and Delivery nursing. My passions now are two wonderful grandchildren, quilting on my HQ 16, sewing, and going where life takes me with my husband of 28 years. I am primarily conservative with moderate views on a couple social issues.

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  • Jul 6

    ((((((Viva Las Vegas))))))))))

  • May 30

    If you have an issue with night shift getting more pay, then go to night shift and do nothing for more money.....although I expect you might change your mind after a week or more.

  • May 21

    If you have an issue with night shift getting more pay, then go to night shift and do nothing for more money.....although I expect you might change your mind after a week or more.

  • Mar 7

    Some people, like me, know what their usual vitals are and if indeed, they are different from what you have just obtained, it might bear checking into their history. My normal temp is usually 97 point 1 or 2, so even a 99.0 could be indicative of a low grade fever.

  • Jan 30

    WSNA is not the only union in WA for nurses. We are represented by USNU, United Staff Nurses Union, and I am happy with them. We bargain hard, our contract is a good one, and when we need union rep back-up for grievances, we get it. I have also heard, just last week, one of my co-workers say of WSNA "when WSNA was here, we got nothing. They didn't help us with grievances at all." I guess that's why USNU is ours now.

  • Dec 5 '15

    Quote from Asystole RN
    By the way, the AR15s used in the terrorist attack were already illegal in California.

    Can't make something already illegal even more illegal and expect them to go away. Well, I guess some would.


    Not that we would ever move back to CA, but IF we were considering it, that would take care of that.

  • Nov 18 '15

    If you have an issue with night shift getting more pay, then go to night shift and do nothing for more money.....although I expect you might change your mind after a week or more.

  • Nov 7 '15

    Another solution which I personally adhere to, is just say no to any extra shifts. I don't go in when they call and are desperate. I feel no obligation to bail them out, even if they whine and cry. It's not my responsibility to staff. It's theirs. If more nurses would work only what their FTE is and nothing more, they'd have no choice, but to increase the FTE's available or hire on agency, traveler's, whatever. Our place relies a lot on guilting nursing into working way over their FTE's and then wondering why people are getting sick or burnt out or just done with it all.

  • Aug 25 '15

    If you have an issue with night shift getting more pay, then go to night shift and do nothing for more money.....although I expect you might change your mind after a week or more.

  • Aug 16 '15

    Quote from icuRNmaggie
    It is helpful to hear in that the pilot will quickly evaluate the people who respond and appoint a leader. Thx tntrn
    When he first started describing it to me, I said, "let me guess...it was like the keystone cops." I am sure we've all seen it.

    I should add that this was pre-911 and now the pilots do not leave the cockpit except to use the loo. Another pilot deadheading might do that now.

    But the cabin crew relays information to the Captain and he/she contacts Med-Link for the serious cases.

  • Aug 15 '15

    Interesting thread: My husband is a retired airline captain with 38 years experience and has related many post-trip medical emergency stories to me.

    First of all,the crew doesn't make medical decisions unless they are very simple problems, such as a passenger who is hyperventilating. The cockpit crew is immediately notified of any serious problem and the cabin crew makes an announcement for any medical personnel to ring their call light. I have done this many times, had a FA quietly come to my seat, I tell them my credentials and experience (for me: RN: Labor and Delivery, OB, peds) and they decide later if I am needed or not.

    For serious problems, the flight crew contacts their medical advise folks, Docs at Med-Link I think it is. Those docs will give orders depending on what information is fed to them from those in the back. The captain is called the Pilot in Command for a reason and he or she will make a decision to request a diversion or to press on, with all the information being taken into account.

    One on occasion, my husband was mid-Pacific,half-way between the West Coast and Hawaii, when an old man coded. Not knowing at the time that he was DNR and going home to die, the crew started CPR and my husband contacted Med-link. Mind you, this guy was gone and there was 3 hours left in the flight regardless of pressing on or turning back. After talking to his wife, finding out he was DNR. my husband told the crew to dc CPR and do what they could to cover him reseated next to his wife. The wife sat with him holding his hand for the remainder of the flight. Med-link wanted them to continue CPR for the remainder of the flight. The PIC said "that's not happening." Med Link then said to restart CPR on approach (I guess to make a show of having done it according to the book) and again the PIC said, "and that's not going to happen either."

    Med-link will be notified for all serious medical problems.

    Years ago, before the Med-Link thing, he told me of a situation where 5 docs of different persuasions responded and my husband did a quick interview and he decided which one of them would be in charge.

    I told my husband that if I were ever on one of his flights and someone went into labor, I, the experienced L and D nurse, would be in charge. He knew I was serious. I am only about 1/4 joking about that, because unless there's a veterinarian, or an actual midwife or OB also on board, I can guarantee I would have had more recent experience and would have "caught"more babies than anybody else who might show.....

    I have made my presence known several times in flight...I have never actually had to help. But I would.

    Personally, going through an entire ACLS procedure mid-flight anywhere, without having any kind of facility for transport within 15-30 minutes from door to door seems like overreach to me.

  • Aug 15 '15

    Interesting thread: My husband is a retired airline captain with 38 years experience and has related many post-trip medical emergency stories to me.

    First of all,the crew doesn't make medical decisions unless they are very simple problems, such as a passenger who is hyperventilating. The cockpit crew is immediately notified of any serious problem and the cabin crew makes an announcement for any medical personnel to ring their call light. I have done this many times, had a FA quietly come to my seat, I tell them my credentials and experience (for me: RN: Labor and Delivery, OB, peds) and they decide later if I am needed or not.

    For serious problems, the flight crew contacts their medical advise folks, Docs at Med-Link I think it is. Those docs will give orders depending on what information is fed to them from those in the back. The captain is called the Pilot in Command for a reason and he or she will make a decision to request a diversion or to press on, with all the information being taken into account.

    One on occasion, my husband was mid-Pacific,half-way between the West Coast and Hawaii, when an old man coded. Not knowing at the time that he was DNR and going home to die, the crew started CPR and my husband contacted Med-link. Mind you, this guy was gone and there was 3 hours left in the flight regardless of pressing on or turning back. After talking to his wife, finding out he was DNR. my husband told the crew to dc CPR and do what they could to cover him reseated next to his wife. The wife sat with him holding his hand for the remainder of the flight. Med-link wanted them to continue CPR for the remainder of the flight. The PIC said "that's not happening." Med Link then said to restart CPR on approach (I guess to make a show of having done it according to the book) and again the PIC said, "and that's not going to happen either."

    Med-link will be notified for all serious medical problems.

    Years ago, before the Med-Link thing, he told me of a situation where 5 docs of different persuasions responded and my husband did a quick interview and he decided which one of them would be in charge.

    I told my husband that if I were ever on one of his flights and someone went into labor, I, the experienced L and D nurse, would be in charge. He knew I was serious. I am only about 1/4 joking about that, because unless there's a veterinarian, or an actual midwife or OB also on board, I can guarantee I would have had more recent experience and would have "caught"more babies than anybody else who might show.....

    I have made my presence known several times in flight...I have never actually had to help. But I would.

    Personally, going through an entire ACLS procedure mid-flight anywhere, without having any kind of facility for transport within 15-30 minutes from door to door seems like overreach to me.

  • Aug 15 '15

    Interesting thread: My husband is a retired airline captain with 38 years experience and has related many post-trip medical emergency stories to me.

    First of all,the crew doesn't make medical decisions unless they are very simple problems, such as a passenger who is hyperventilating. The cockpit crew is immediately notified of any serious problem and the cabin crew makes an announcement for any medical personnel to ring their call light. I have done this many times, had a FA quietly come to my seat, I tell them my credentials and experience (for me: RN: Labor and Delivery, OB, peds) and they decide later if I am needed or not.

    For serious problems, the flight crew contacts their medical advise folks, Docs at Med-Link I think it is. Those docs will give orders depending on what information is fed to them from those in the back. The captain is called the Pilot in Command for a reason and he or she will make a decision to request a diversion or to press on, with all the information being taken into account.

    One on occasion, my husband was mid-Pacific,half-way between the West Coast and Hawaii, when an old man coded. Not knowing at the time that he was DNR and going home to die, the crew started CPR and my husband contacted Med-link. Mind you, this guy was gone and there was 3 hours left in the flight regardless of pressing on or turning back. After talking to his wife, finding out he was DNR. my husband told the crew to dc CPR and do what they could to cover him reseated next to his wife. The wife sat with him holding his hand for the remainder of the flight. Med-link wanted them to continue CPR for the remainder of the flight. The PIC said "that's not happening." Med Link then said to restart CPR on approach (I guess to make a show of having done it according to the book) and again the PIC said, "and that's not going to happen either."

    Med-link will be notified for all serious medical problems.

    Years ago, before the Med-Link thing, he told me of a situation where 5 docs of different persuasions responded and my husband did a quick interview and he decided which one of them would be in charge.

    I told my husband that if I were ever on one of his flights and someone went into labor, I, the experienced L and D nurse, would be in charge. He knew I was serious. I am only about 1/4 joking about that, because unless there's a veterinarian, or an actual midwife or OB also on board, I can guarantee I would have had more recent experience and would have "caught"more babies than anybody else who might show.....

    I have made my presence known several times in flight...I have never actually had to help. But I would.

    Personally, going through an entire ACLS procedure mid-flight anywhere, without having any kind of facility for transport within 15-30 minutes from door to door seems like overreach to me.



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