Content That noreenl Likes

Content That noreenl Likes

noreenl 5,573 Views

Joined Jul 8, '09. Posts: 341 (28% Liked) Likes: 176

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  • Nov 22 '13

    Quote from inspiredbynavy
    I never said this nurse was in the wrong for yelling, nor did I ever "condemn" her for it. I think many of you might have skipped the fact that I said I'm new to the hospital environment and I'm learning.
    No but you said it's an ethical topic which is stating the nurse is being morally wrong.

    Anyway, I am one of those person who if I speak loader my "tone" gets meaner. My husband tells me that but I can't seem to change it.

  • Nov 8 '13

    I was a longtime office worker who left my field of 12+ years for nursing, for all of the same reasons you mentioned. I'm a newish grad--working since Feb, on my own since June, so take my opinion for what you will. I'm sure some will say I haven't had time to become jaded, but I hope I won't, because I plan to be a nurse for a long time.

    In my prior positions I received a good amount of praise from employers, coworkers and clients. I made roughly the same money as I make now (but I would make LESS than I made before if I worked days.) Like you, I spent 9-10 hours behind a desk, although my days were largely fast-paced and stressful and I worked through lunch many days. I worked out regularly after work because I was so sedentary during the day.

    As a new nurse, I rarely get any acknowledgement for anything I do unless it's from a patient, in passing (which is really the most rewarding feedback anyway.) I definitely don't get treated (by fellow medical professionals) with anything approaching the respect and professional courtesy I was accustomed to in my previous career. I work 12-13 hour shifts, and I often chart during lunch. I never work out after work any more (night shift), but I do try to go at least 1x a week. I feel unsure on a regular basis. Others make it their mission to correct me regularly. This is often the reality of a new nurse. Do you think you can take it?

    For me, the answer is yes. I was telling my husband the other night that despite feeling insecure and unsure of myself most of the time--something I've never dealt with in any previous position--my level of life satisfaction is much higher, now that I am no longer working behind a desk 5 days a week, getting up early, fighting traffic, and wearing conservative clothes, not to mention no longer dealing with people who act like first world inconveniences are the end. Of. The. Flipping. World. Give me a full load of 5 truly sick patients over my entitled former clients, any day of the week. YMMV.

  • Jan 31 '13

    Brava!! Well done!
    God help the nurse who wont let me have the same!!!! I will haunt that person for rest of their days!

    After my dad stroked and was on a progressive downward spiral, he would still sneak a cigarette and/or drink. Seldom finished either and I was glad to let him do it.

    Miss my dad for sure, each and every day

  • Dec 28 '12

    A six pound seven ounce son, 12:12 12/25!!!

  • Oct 26 '12

    Quote from lizashleyc
    Although I can see how this would be fun to talk about in the spirit of Halloween, I do find this subject to be one that frustrates me to hear about. Although we are all entitled to our religious and afterlife beliefs, I find the beliefs in these stories or occurrences by a hospital professional to be assumptive and honestly quite silly.

    More than anything, I would worry about quality of client care in a situation such as the one a previous commenter described in which seemingly stable clients would suddenly die. If any hospital professional actually believed such a thing was caused by a "ghost" or what have you, that may very well prevent them from discovering a real, science-based explanation for such a thing happening. It would likely even prevent them from looking in-depth into possibilities or encouraging others to do so. Worst of all, nothing could be corrected or modified to prevent future recurrences. That is negligence, pure and simple.

    It is my opinion that no religious/afterlife beliefs have a place in the workplace for several reasons, client safety and quality improvement issues being most important. Here's another seemingly small example of one's belief in such things impacting care: Nurse A hears from Nurse B that room #13 is haunted, and she is caring for a client in there today. Even though Nurse A isn't sure she believes in ghosts or things like that, the story that Nurse B had told her floats around in the back of her mind all day.

    Subconsciously, this bias results in Nurse A avoiding room #13 more often than she should. The patient might be a very weak, elderly man who is receiving a new antibiotic, but instead of coming in to assess his IV line in a timely manner and to assess the patient's overall status, the nurse decides she'll just go check another patient down the hall first because she is the only one in that specific hallway and she feels a bit creeped out.

    Think of everything that could happen to said patient as a result of simple avoidances like that. Think of how it might influence the client's perception of the nurse and vice versa. Think of what happens if Nurse A tells Nurse C about what Nurse B says, and imagine if the lack of care continues. Case in short: everything has an explanation and coincidences happen. A professional nurse should recognize her biases (ie religious/afterlife) beliefs and not let them interfere with her provision of quality of care and clients' continuity of care.

    Honey, we are NURSES. Nothing scares us.

  • Oct 26 '12

    Quote from lizashleyc
    Although I can see how this would be fun to talk about in the spirit of Halloween, I do find this subject to be one that frustrates me to hear about. Although we are all entitled to our religious and afterlife beliefs, I find the beliefs in these stories or occurrences by a hospital professional to be assumptive and honestly quite silly.

    More than anything, I would worry about quality of client care in a situation such as the one a previous commenter described in which seemingly stable clients would suddenly die. If any hospital professional actually believed such a thing was caused by a "ghost" or what have you, that may very well prevent them from discovering a real, science-based explanation for such a thing happening. It would likely even prevent them from looking in-depth into possibilities or encouraging others to do so. Worst of all, nothing could be corrected or modified to prevent future recurrences. That is negligence, pure and simple.

    It is my opinion that no religious/afterlife beliefs have a place in the workplace for several reasons, client safety and quality improvement issues being most important. Here's another seemingly small example of one's belief in such things impacting care: Nurse A hears from Nurse B that room #13 is haunted, and she is caring for a client in there today. Even though Nurse A isn't sure she believes in ghosts or things like that, the story that Nurse B had told her floats around in the back of her mind all day.

    Subconsciously, this bias results in Nurse A avoiding room #13 more often than she should. The patient might be a very weak, elderly man who is receiving a new antibiotic, but instead of coming in to assess his IV line in a timely manner and to assess the patient's overall status, the nurse decides she'll just go check another patient down the hall first because she is the only one in that specific hallway and she feels a bit creeped out.

    Think of everything that could happen to said patient as a result of simple avoidances like that. Think of how it might influence the client's perception of the nurse and vice versa. Think of what happens if Nurse A tells Nurse C about what Nurse B says, and imagine if the lack of care continues.

    Case in short: everything has an explanation and coincidences happen. A professional nurse should recognize her biases (ie religious/afterlife) beliefs and not let them interfere with her provision of quality of care and clients' continuity of care.
    Welcome to AN! The largest online nursing community.

    Coincidences do happen and there are explanations (most of the time) for strange things in our environment.... but I feel that a nurse can be professional and tell stories about urban legends about the work place for the reality that surrounds us most of the time can be over whelming. What specialty do you work? Have there ever been any stories about your department?

    I think that the intention of this post is to share stories/folklore that is associated with many facilities/places....not just hospitals. Anytime there is a place of death and tragedy....sorrow and heartbreak...there will be stories of ghosts or weird occurrences.

    I have never, in 34 years of nursing, ever saw anyone refuse to enter a room because it was haunted...although I have had some reticent to enter the morgue and I had to escort them to ally their fears. Many nurses while they may not have certain beliefs....... respect the beliefs of others.

    In my experience........Sitting around and telling stories is comic relief.......and in no way interferes with patient care or safety.

    Lets stick to the topic of the post....a light hearted place to share our stories of urban legends

  • Oct 26 '12

    Ugh, I didn't think someone would be so quick to ***** in our Kool-Aid...

  • Oct 3 '12

    My favorite in a funny cute way was my 90+ year old patient's last night. I work in a rehab/SNF and this guy is just ready to go home. So last night at 3am, he calls me into his room to run his "plan" by me. He wanted to know what I thought about his idea to pack up his stuff and leave with his daughters after the visited later that day. Yeah, I think that is kind of a bad idea. I do feel bad for him because he really wants to go back to where he was living and apparently it isn't appropriate for him anymore.

    Generally, most requests don't bother me out of context. Asking to have your toe nails trimmed doesn't bother me on its own but if it is 3am and I'm in the middle of Q 15min neuro checks because of a fall with all the ensuing paperwork/charting and the only reason you want your nails trimmed is because you heard another patients asking about getting her nails trimmed, well it bothers me a little more then.

  • Oct 3 '12

    Thank you for this. Thank you, thank you, thank you.

    At the beginning of my shift one night on a med-surg floor, I was told I'd get an admission; a patient from a bigger hospital who was coming to us on a 'virtual hospice bed'.

    My hospice patient arrived close to 8:30 that night, and his family came with him - his wife, two grown daughters (who were both nurses), their children, and his two grown sons. They came in irate. Our hospital rooms are tiny, and they had been promised our 'hospice' room - a double occupancy room with one bed removed and a couch in its place. They were not told that the hospice room was occupied, or that they would be getting a 'regular' private room. I got my hospice patient bathed and changed into a new gown, did my assessment, then told the family I would be back as soon as I gave a stat med to one of my other patients. We have a new call system, with a remote control in the rooms to call the nurse, so the call bells on the beds do not work. I explained this, told them how to reach me, and was off. Apparently while I was gathering the med, a new family member came in and hit the call bell on the bed. I was standing outside the hall of my other patient's room when she came storming up the hall, a murderous look on her face. I didn't recognize her, but I asked her what was wrong. She said, "You can find me the worthless nurse for my DYING FATHER and get her down here NOW." She pointed towards the room, and with a sinking heart, I told her I was her father's nurse. I told her I had to pass this med and I would be down to her father's room immediately.

    I passed the med and went down to his room. The woman was standing outside his door, arms crossed. I opened my mouth to say something, but didn't get a word out before she exploded. "I have been hitting this call bell for fifteen minutes and NO ONE answered. I think my father's in pain, and this room is too small, and we don't have enough room for our family to be here, and this is ridiculous and cruel. I want to speak to your house supervisor, NOW." I told her I would go call the house supervisor, and as I was walking up the hall, several of my fellow nurses who had heard her commented - all along the lines of "Wow, what an awful family." I called the house supervisor and returned to her father's room with pain medicine. On the way down there, I thought about what his family was facing. This man had only received his diagnosis six weeks prior - they hadn't even had time to process that this man was sick, let alone dying. And now here he lay, in a tiny, cramped room, nonverbal and unable to turn himself, unable to control his bladder or bowels, and he had just endured an hour-long ambulance ride with his family following behind.

    I gave her father the pain medicine, then approached the woman and told her, "Listen, I think we got off on the wrong foot. I have called the house supervisor and she is coming, but while we're waiting, please allow me the chance to talk to you." I asked her if she had used the call bell on the remote and she said no. I explained that was why I didn't get her calls. I went over the new call system and demonstrated it for her. Then I told her how sorry I was that this was happening to her father and her family, and that I understood their frustration with the small room, especially when they were told they would have the hospice room. I told her I didn't know if we could switch his room, but I got extra chairs, pillows, and blankets from the supply closet. I told her that it was my desire to do everything I possibly could to make sure her father and her family was as comfortable as I could make them. Then I went to the pantry and fixed a pot of coffee, and brought coffee down for everyone.

    We were unable to switch rooms that night, but the woman and her family warmed up to me as the hours wore on. Before I left that morning, she pulled me aside and said she was sorry, that she had misunderstood the night before and was afraid that I would be negligent towards her father. I told her she had no reason to be sorry - she didn't know me from Adam and wanted to make sure her father was properly cared for -- any daughter would want that.

    What I have written a book to say is that, as nurses, it is so easy to forget what it's like to be the family member. It's easy to see the families as difficult and demanding, and pass judgement without ever really considering the enormity of the changes they are facing in their lives. We forget sometimes to read between the lines, and to realize that we are just an outlet for these families' anger, hurt, and confusion. That doesn't mean that we should allow ourselves to be mistreated, but it does mean that they need the very best of our nursing skills - our compassion, our understanding, and our ability to bear witness and stand beside them. As CheesePotato says, they know that their loved one is dying, even if they don't understand the medical jargon for it, they don't need any more demonstrations from us on how we know the person is dying. They need us to say, "I am so sorry. I am here, and I am honored to care for your loved one and your family, and I will be here with you through this. I AM HERE, AND I CARE."

    Sorry this is so long, but CheesePotato, your article really, really touched me.

  • Aug 1 '12

    Quote from flyingscot
    the truth is if this is a policy she can't live with then her only option is to find another place to work. the hospital is not going to change its policy based on her complaints so this is actually pretty sound advice.
    i know, right? i mean, i get kind of tired of the people here who want to dictate the exact way in which they receive the opinions that they solicited. i'm sorry that "if you don't like it leave" is too short or abrupt of a response, but it's just the response some people chose, because it's kind of the truth. some people aren't as diplomatic as others. i don't feel like i'm here to protect egos and coddle people who can't deal with the responsibility of having a big girl job.

  • Aug 1 '12

    Quote from veggie530
    albeit they should be asked of her union reps and she should know what is in her contract.
    The "if you don't like it, leave" attitude is hardly beneficial here. If that was always the attitude, then we'd all have no country (let alone place of employment) to call home.
    As said above, without a union, jobs are pretty take it or leave it, especially in the current situation of nurses being a dime a dozen.

    Quote from tothepointeLVN
    Admittedly it'd be pointless trying evacuate Los Angeles you'd never get anywhere ala the end of the world according to John Cusack.
    Is it possible that I'm not the only one who makes their disaster plans based on natural disaster movies?

  • Aug 1 '12

    OP, I have a very serious question for you: What alternative solution do you suggest?

    Hospitals are not schools. They cannot have snow days and close the doors and tell everyone to stay home. Patients in the hospital are sick and need care. Other people continue to get sick or injured even during a natural disaster. If every hospital in your area closed their doors, what would happen to the people who are sick or injured? If the hospital staff left after their shift, and no staff were able to come in to replace them, what would happen to the patients?

    No, being on a "stay team" is not an ideal situation. But you know what? Sometimes in life there are no good solutions to problems. There is only the best choice out of the worst solutions. Before you start complaining and arguing about the policy, I would encourage you to put yourself in the shoes of the administrators who MUST come up with a solution to these potential problems in advance. So please spend a few minutes doing this. What ideas do you have to make the disaster plan better? What pros and cons are there to the ideas you have?


    Last September I was scheduled to work the weekend that Hurricane Irene was meant to strike the east coast. Employees were told that we were not allowed to call out during the disaster- we were expected to be there to work if scheduled. It would be considered a no-call, no-show and we could risk losing our job. I knew that if I were to leave after my shift on Saturday night there was a very good chance I would not be able to get back to the hospital on Sunday morning due to flooding. I knew that there was a good chance I could lose my job. Was I FORCED to come in? No. Were there consequences if I chose not to? Yes.

    So what did I do? I arranged to have my dogs boarded in a safe place. I packed extra clothes, toiletries, and food and planned to stay at the hospital all weekend to be there for my shifts. I slept in a spare hospital room with several co workers and got up the next morning to work another shift. Was it an ideal situation? Absolutely not. Was it necessary? Yes.

    You know what happened that Sunday while I was at work? My house was flooded with three feet of water. We lost thousands of dollars worth of possessions. Furniture, clothing, appliances, personal effects... When I left work on Sunday night I was unable to return to my house due to flooding. I was able to pick up my dogs and I spent a week staying with a friend with nothing but the bag I had packed in the hospital.

    But you know what else happened that Sunday night? I was helping our team of doctors stabilize a critically ill 4 year old child with leukemia in septic shock. We intubated her, got her on a conventional ventilator, placed a central line, placed an arterial line, started her on vasopressors, gave her fluid boluses, hung antibiotics, drew blood work, switched her to an oscillating ventilator, added more vasopressors, gave blood transfusions, and drew more blood work.

    Now, let me ask you- what would have happened to that little girl at your hospital if there was no disaster plan in place? If there were not doctors, nurses, respiratory therapists and pharmacists who were mandated to come to work? Who would have cared for this patient, whose broken, run down immune system didn't care that there was a hurricane outside? Nobody- and she would have died.

    Are disaster plans perfect? Absolutely not. Do they put the staff in a great situation, with benefits and extra perks and smiles on their faces? Not one bit. But for the sick, the injured, and those who cannot survive without us- are they necessary? You better believe it.

  • Aug 1 '12

    I work in long term care. I've been at work for hurricanes, floods, and blizzards. We had a huge blizzard on a Saturday. They called me because I lived close by and asked me to come in. The facility had a generator so there was heat and light. I was the senior person there and had to mandate staff to stay. No one really liked it, but we made the best of it. I was there for 36 hours with one hour of sleep. You do what you have to do. PS. It was a union building but the governor declared a state of emergency so.....

  • Aug 1 '12

    Quote from veggie530
    she doesn't sound entitled at all. she's asking legitimate questions --

    which were answered honestly (snarky comments aside) but the op didn't like the answers.

    from what she describes, she could be at the hospital for a week and unable to leave. what is she suppose to do, expect her children to hunt & gather while mommy is prisoner at work? it is ultimately her responsibility to know what is required of her, but it is her prerogative to put up with it or not.

    she did not mention children being the issue that was another poster. she mentioned not getting special pay and having to share a room with a co-worker as the big problem.

    the "if you don't like it, leave" attitude is hardly beneficial here. if that was always the attitude, then we'd all have no country (let alone place of employment) to call home.
    the truth is if this is a policy she can't live with then her only option is to find another place to work. the hospital is not going to change its policy based on her complaints so this is actually pretty sound advice.

  • Aug 1 '12

    The unions pay for special disaster protection spell that covers the entire area.


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