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Not_A_Hat_Person, RN 33,555 Views

Joined Dec 5, '08. Posts: 3,446 (51% Liked) Likes: 5,971

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  • Nov 18

    Quote from saongiri
    I am still confused why an ED nurse would be assisting with an abortion?
    As I mentioned a few times earlier in this thread, she wouldn't be assisting with an abortion. She might assist with giving methotrexate for an ectopic pregnancy, or giving emergency contraception to a woman after an assault.

    I suspect, in her Catholic mind, she considers those "abortions" even though they're not.

  • Nov 18

    I am still confused why an ED nurse would be assisting with an abortion?

  • Nov 18

    [QUOTE=MrNurse(x2);9643112]She may also balance her pain meds with her need to be engaged in life. There is just as many issues with prescription drugs, the numbers are staggering. By the statistics, one car in six has an impaired driver. Wrap your head around that. Many chronic pain patients, myself included, choose to endure the pain rather than feel the way the meds make us feel and endanger others. I would rather be able to drive than be impaired.[/QUOTE
    If you are in significant pain, you are likely not a safe driver...

  • Nov 18

    I usually do a pain management teaching with my patients and explain that I want to keep their pain under a four because it takes less drugs to keep them under that level than trying to play catch up. I also reassure them that their reasons for needing pain medications are legit. I err on the side of trusting patients on their pain reporting when I first meet them - even if I'm uncertain about their behaviour, if the order is there, I will give it and bring my concerns to the doc after.

    I feel that pain management and narcotics use is a pendulum, and we have definitely swung to the far side. However, most docs I've worked with still recognize patients with legit chronic pain and treat it as such.

    I do know of patients with chronic pain issues who are afraid f being labelled "drug seeking" but it's our job to advocate for them and proper pain control

  • Nov 18

    Being a caregiver for a family member with dementia can be v. difficult and draining, and makes everything else you're trying to get done that much harder. I realize you feel like you're trying to do too much in too little time already, but have you thought about getting some therapy? Or attending a family/caregiver support group? Either of those things might be helpful. Best wishes!

  • Nov 18

    Quote from AutumnApple
    In my area, healthcare facilities are in a panic trying to hire nurses. More than a handful of hospitals have revamped their compensation package in hopes of landing some new hires who actually stick around for more than a year. Two and three year sign on bonuses are back.

    And these hospitals have "nursing diploma" programs directly linked to them but, it's still not enough.

    The general thought process (in my area) is that most facilities are already running short, but have managed to avoid hitting the panic button but they are not striving, they are just getting by. In the next five years, eventually everyone will have their finger on the panic button. Many agree, some facilities will have to downsize or even close due to lack of staffing.

    A huge percentage of our current population is getting to the age where they become more dependent on healthcare to manage. That, coupled with so many nurses retiring, puts us in a position where need outweighs product availability by too much.

    Having dozens and dozens of schools does nothing to relieve this issue. For every graduating class of 24 (ish) nurses, only a handful of them take a local position and stay there for any amount of time. Many of them move on to other areas where nurses are more needed and schools are less common. Some get jobs "related to" nursing and avoid bedside care completely. More than a few get into the field then decide its not what they wanted. We haven't even mentioned yet the ones who never practice bedside care and instead continue their education into another "related to nursing" field.

    The list of variables that diminish the school's effect on the nursing shortage is endless. You can churn out hundreds of grads every semester yet, the healthcare facilities are still left standing there with a "Where did everyone go?" expression on their faces when none of the new grads come to them to fill open positions. And the ones who do, don't last.

    So, the forward thinking facilities have all realized this and are focusing on retaining nurses again. This makes me think back to the days when the recession first hit and it became difficult to find new work on our field. I heard horror stories of HR people feeling their oates and boasting about how they could treat nurses any which way they wanted and the days of "Having to beg for nurses to work" were gone.

    Better get your tin cup out I guess cause, those days are back with a vengeance.
    You raise a nuanced point. Lack of staff due to a nursing shortage is not the same as having trouble filling positions because your facility's working conditions absolutely stink.

  • Nov 18

    Quote from Jedrnurse
    Future shortage? Doubtful. There may be a surge of retirements, but programs are still churning out grads (ASNs, BSNs ABSNs, etc.), so don't count on a shortage...
    Quote from NurseSpeedy
    Yeah, we have nursing schools on every corner here. Some are a bit shady but many are still passing there NCLEX.
    Quote from mmc51264
    There is already a huge shortage in places. Here in the Raleigh-Durham area, there is a shortage. It's a nurse's market as all the facilities need help. We have the UNC system which includes several satellite hospitals and then the Duke system, a VA hosp. not a long distance away are Vidant hosp systems.
    Duke is building yet another tower which will put us at about 1200 beds. The VA across the street is about 350 beds.

    Everyone is looking for help.
    In my area, healthcare facilities are in a panic trying to hire nurses. More than a handful of hospitals have revamped their compensation package in hopes of landing some new hires who actually stick around for more than a year. Two and three year sign on bonuses are back.

    And these hospitals have "nursing diploma" programs directly linked to them but, it's still not enough.

    The general thought process (in my area) is that most facilities are already running short, but have managed to avoid hitting the panic button but they are not striving, they are just getting by. In the next five years, eventually everyone will have their finger on the panic button. Many agree, some facilities will have to downsize or even close due to lack of staffing.

    A huge percentage of our current population is getting to the age where they become more dependent on healthcare to manage. That, coupled with so many nurses retiring, puts us in a position where need outweighs product availability by too much.

    Having dozens and dozens of schools does nothing to relieve this issue. For every graduating class of 24 (ish) nurses, only a handful of them take a local position and stay there for any amount of time. Many of them move on to other areas where nurses are more needed and schools are less common. Some get jobs "related to" nursing and avoid bedside care completely. More than a few get into the field then decide its not what they wanted. We haven't even mentioned yet the ones who never practice bedside care and instead continue their education into another "related to nursing" field.

    The list of variables that diminish the school's effect on the nursing shortage is endless. You can churn out hundreds of grads every semester yet, the healthcare facilities are still left standing there with a "Where did everyone go?" expression on their faces when none of the new grads come to them to fill open positions. And the ones who do, don't last.

    So, the forward thinking facilities have all realized this and are focusing on retaining nurses again. This makes me think back to the days when the recession first hit and it became difficult to find new work on our field. I heard horror stories of HR people feeling their oates and boasting about how they could treat nurses any which way they wanted and the days of "Having to beg for nurses to work" were gone.

    Better get your tin cup out I guess cause, those days are back with a vengeance.

  • Nov 18

    From what I understand, the "BSN necessary for bedside nursing" thing is very geographical. Seems to me NYC is known for it more than anyone else, but that's just information I have from word of mouth reports.

    Most areas, like my own, gently *push* people to have/obtain the BSN but don't require it. By "gently push" I mean: They pressure you to get it, talk it up and everything else but bail if they think it'll cost them anything. They want it, but they want the financial burden for getting it to be strictly yours.

    Associates nurses are the norm still it seems, and it will stay that way. Too many cuts in healthcare going on for facilities to require a higher level of education. Eventually, the burden of paying for it would fall on them and, as I said, they want nothing to do with that.

    Seems to me, every job posting says the job prefers (some even say "requires") a BSN but, associates nurses end up filling the position. They should just cut to the chase and word it: "Prefers a BSN at associates nurse wages."

  • Nov 18

    It really depends on the locale. In an big city with many nursing schools churning out a ready supply of new grads, it can be very hard to get hospital job with an ASN. In other areas of the country, particularly in rural areas, it can be very easy to get a hospital job with an ASN only, as there are more jobs than RNs available and willing to take them.

    In my moderately large city with several (6?) nursing programs most hospitals are moving towards BSN-only or contract-to-complete BSN for hire.

  • Nov 18

    Quote from saskrn
    Of course they can! I see them everywhere, both urban and rural hospitals. I don't understand why anyone would think otherwise.
    because there are actual hospitals that don't...

  • Nov 18

    Quote from StocktonNurse
    I say with the future nursing shortage coming soon, that organizations will have to be open to hiring ASN's. Lots nurses retiring from the baby boomer age group and nurses in my organization are retiring in the mid 50's.
    Future shortage? Doubtful. There may be a surge of retirements, but programs are still churning out grads (ASNs, BSNs ABSNs, etc.), so don't count on a shortage...

  • Nov 18

    I did both. I worked two 12 hr night shifts while in a 15 month ABSN program and took balance transfer offers (one credit card allowed you to direct deposit into checking). I paid down the credit card as much as I could and when the 12 months 0% financing was done, I transferred to another card. By the end of the second balance transfer I was established in my nursing job. The fees were 3-4% of amount transferred which was cheaper than a personal loan.

  • Nov 10

    Very sad.

    But there is no shortage of nurses, only a shortage of nurses willing to work for low pay and for poor benefits.

    How do other countries deal with this?

  • Nov 10

    I have five kids, and I refuse to stay late (except when I still need to finish charting). When I worked 8 hr day shifts, 1600 was my hard-stop time (shift over at 1530.) The reason: daycare closed at 1630.
    I don't work for places that use mandatory OT as a routine staffing practice. Management's failure to plan is neither my emergency, nor is it my family's.

    Here's the thing though: I do NOT expect special treatment because I am a mom. What I expect is what I believe ALL of us need to expect.
    Management's failure to plan is not YOUR emergency either, and ALL of us should be refusing any OT we don't want.

  • Nov 10

    Quote from Agatha12
    I know it is controversial topic. First I explain myself a bit. I would like to have children at some point but I dont have them at the moment as I deal with some health issues and I havent met right partner to be father.

    Now main problem. Why staff with children always think that will have priority to go home on time and will refuse to stay longer if required only because they have kids? Childless staff also have plans, responsibilities or simple would like to have time to cook for a next day.

    I believe some fair system should be in place. Once mothers go home early, on other occasion they stay longer and single people enjoy their time. Any thoughts? Am I wrong to think so?
    Everyone should "have priority to go home on time". If this is a regular problem where you're at, maybe employees should be getting on management instead of each other.
    I personally feel it should be handled like an over-booked flight. An incentive should be offered and continue to be increased until there's a volunteer.


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