Julie Reyes, DNP, CPNP-AC, RN's Nursing Blog

By Julie Reyes, DNP, CPNP-AC, RN

Hi! I am Julie, a pediatric nurse who recently became a CPNP-AC and a DNP.

The following are articles I have written and shared with the nursing community. If you enjoy an article please leave a comment and tell me what you think.

Study Tips for Nursing Students

Were your grades less than ideal this semester? Are you just beginning to dive into college life and are worried about how to study and making the grades you need? It is important to take college seriously for several reasons. College is expensive! You need to make good grades so you don’t get suspended or put on academic probation. You don’t want to have to drop out or fail a class because you didn’t know how to study, or worse yet - you don’t want to be dropped from your nursing program!... Read More →


Civil War Nursing

The American Red Cross. We have all heard about it, but how did it begin? Clara Barton took supplies to battlefronts during the Civil War, and organized teams of volunteers to assist with the overwhelming need to deliver items such as medical treatment, clothing, or food. She encouraged religious affiliations to respond to the need of service men and send trained nurses (nuns) to the field hospitals. She later founded the American Red Cross. Dorthea Dix was an activist who marched on... Read More →


Nursing in the Revolutionary War

“Hush now, say your prayers and go to sleep,” I tell her, “we have a long day tomorrow.” She rolls over and looks at her brother, who looks back at me with tired, deep blue eyes filled with fear. Will we always live on the edge of fear? I stand up and put out the fire. It is hot out, and with the sun going down, we don’t want to give away ourselves with firelight. It’s dark, and I can hear the others, some cursing under their breath, some crying softly. All are in quiet tones for fear... Read More →


A Tribute to Military Nurses

Hot Lips Houlihan. I thought she was the toughest, smartest, most amazing person in the world! She made me want to be a nurse when I grew up, because I wanted to be her. I watched her (MASH) everyday after school, at 5 pm - if I had finished my homework. I thought that life as a military nurse would be exciting and challenging! I never had the opportunity to have that dream come true, but I want to take this opportunity to thank the men and women who are military nurses. I cannot... Read More →


7 Things to know BEFORE Sims Lab!

It is Simulations Lab Day for the nursing students I teach in my university. As I walk to the lab to prepare for the events of the day, the hallway is lined with students listening to their ipod, cramming notes, drinking coffee and talking nervously. I smile at them and tell them they will do great….if they have prepared! The instructors here do not want our students to fail. Sims Lab is about learning on mannequins before we get them out to the real world. Hands on experience,... Read More →


The Fine Line

The fine line between being a professional with compassion and empathy with CLEAR boundaries versus being, well – me, runs a bit blurry. I remember this being pounded into my brain in nursing school – and I have never really learned the lesson. Sometimes it wears me thin, and at other times, I am glad that I chose to give a little extra. I have many friends from work and when I talk to them, I know I am not alone in my feelings. I wonder if the reason we sometimes get more attached is... Read More →


RN...to me, means real nurse

The day I got my acceptance letter into nursing school was a highlight! I called every family member and friend I knew! What new soon to be real nurse doesn’t? When I got my first “D” on an exam, I freaked out - and ran crying to my professor. She told me, in the nicest way possible, to put my big girl panties on. In nursing school, a course grade of a C is the new A….right? The day I went to buy my college scrubs for clinicals was again, a highlight! I had been looking forward to... Read More →


Dealing With Death in the PICU

It has been a particularly harsh summer for me and the nurses I work with. I have had seven of my patients pass away, either on my shift when I was their nurse, or on a different shift. I have advocated for my patient to grieving parents who were left with the decision to withdraw care or to prolong the suffering. I handed a 2 month old child to his mother to cradle in her arms when support was withdrawn – he was beaten by his father because he would not take his bottle. I battled for the life... Read More →


Bullying in the Workplace

October is National Bullying Awareness Month. Bullying can occur in places other than on the schoolyard or in the school hallways. Bullying in the workplace is a very real occurrence that happens on a daily basis. Nurses can be victims of a bully in several ways: horizontal (from upper level management – charge nurse, supervisor, manager, etc), vertical (nurse to nurse), or even from patients. This article will focus on bullying from coworkers. I was caring for my 16 month old patient who... Read More →


Ebola - My Right to Accept or Refuse an Assignment

Ebola. The very name of this evil virus is striking anxiety in the bravest of nurses. Nurses everywhere are facing the question of “what will I do when it comes here?” We ask ourselves if we would accept the assignment of caring for the patient, or refuse it. We consider the cost of risking our lives to care for the sick – and - what about my children? What about my loved ones? If I accept this assignment, am I putting my family at risk? I have heard an array of comments on the... Read More →


Does God Make Mistakes?

I looked up at the doctor across the crib who is still hovering over him and checking his ventilator and trachea. Wildly he flailed as the doctor touched his abdomen. I tried to calm him by holding his hand. This is the first I noticed his fingers, some webbed together nearly to the ends, and the digits not coming from the palm in a normal way, but more like a sunburst. I looked more closely at him then. His legs were small and his feet were clubfoot. He has a feeding tube in his... Read More →


I wish I were blind

i wish i were blind by julie reyes he was huge, from the floor up and side to side. he walked down the hallway, never looking up, never acknowledging our presence. as he walked past the nurses’ station he stared at his shoes. icky 'gangster' shoes, shorts nearly touching his ankles and baggy t-shirt with some annoying pictures printed on the front, hanging down past his rear end. “geesh!” i thought. “sloppy!” he had one of those scraggly hair gone wild goatees that only covers... Read More →



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