Content That ProfRN4 Likes

Content That ProfRN4 Likes

ProfRN4, MSN 13,891 Views

Joined Apr 5, '03. ProfRN4 is a nursing professor. She has '20+' year(s) of experience. Posts: 2,241 (22% Liked) Likes: 1,312

Sorted By Last Like Given (Max 500)
  • Aug 27

    I was a patient in the hospital recently, nurse came in with fire engine red hair in pigtails, she appeared to be on the younger side. She was absolutely wonderful & competent. Yet, despite being 31 with a history of unnatural hair colors, wild piercings & tattoos myself (which I've mostly outgrown at this point), I found myself "judging" this very competent nurse. After conversing with her awhile I no longer noticed it. Way of the world: People are going to judge you. Your outward appearance is the first thing that they'll take note of.

  • Aug 27

    Quote from decarla
    Hi there, I have a small strip of pink in my hair. They never said anything. The old fogies gotta go! Try it. If they tell you get rid of it, you can always get it colored back near your color.
    I work with a 22 year old who rolls her eyes when we see someone who has Muppet colored hair or hairpieces, says it looks ridiculous. Is she an old fogie?

  • Aug 27

    You are right, hair color or style does not dictate professionalism or performance, but unfortunately we
    live in a society where people are judged by their appearance. Anything extreme or a shift out of the norm is viewed negative. I personally wouldn't do it. Their are hair color sprays you can experiment with on your days off.

  • Aug 27

    You show up at work with a 'unconventional Hair Color" or Hairstyle and you will be going home that day without pay, and not coming back until you look professional.

    Last year had a employee come to work with a Mohawk, He tried to tell me it was a military thing. He got sent home that morning. He came back later that day with very short hair. I don't play.

  • Aug 27

    Quote from ScientistSalarian
    Hahahaha stop that. As far as I'm concerned, the day I stop being carded every time I buy alcohol and people stop assuming I'm a baby fresh out of college is the day I will CONSIDER being "too old" for something.

    Besides, this might be the push I need to get that lounge act off the ground
    Actually, everybody pretty much gets carded these days. Even 80 year old women. It's a policy many places have in place so people don't have to differentiate. So, that card doesn't really work here. I'm actually kind of in agreement with that sentiment that you are 30, not 18, and that makes a difference in professionalism. It's one thing to put a couple of hidden streaks in there. I guess us Gen-Xr's are just old fogies these days.

    That 18 year old with green hair will probably get hired over the 30 year old with green hair. There's a difference whether you want to see that or not. I know you already have a job, but I'm hoping you understand what I am saying here.

    Look, I'm 40, I get it. There are times when I would love to have lavender hair or do something just way out of the ordinary. I do not in any way, shape, or form, look 40. I still wear Pink sweatpants and T-shirts. At home only. They are the most comfy, long lasting, clothes out there. Some of their sweatpants I have had for almost 5 years and still look great. Plus, I can afford $54 for a pair of sweatpants that will last me. Most 22 year olds can't. But, you won't see me wearing them to Target. I know I'm technically too old to wear that stuff. But, I can't get past the comfort. Plus, I wear my hair in braids, at home. You won't see me do that at work. I know I'm not 20.

    I don't advertise that I am 40. But I will pull it out when I'm dosing out some wisdom. People respect wisdom. With age comes a little bit of stability and wisdom. I absolutely feared turning the big 4-0. But, I will tell you this has been the most fabulous year of my life. But I do recognize that I won't be wearing any sequin mini-dresses anytime in life anymore!!

  • Aug 27

    Quote from decarla
    Hi there, I have a small strip of pink in my hair. They never said anything. The old fogies gotta go! Try it. If they tell you get rid of it, you can always get it colored back near your color.
    Where, exactly... should I go?

  • Aug 27

    Quote from Extra Pickles
    generally speaking if you find yourself asking if something is unprofessional, and someone you know and trust tells you it's unprofessional, it's unprofessional!

    if you don't care that crazy hair colors might negatively affect your career then you should do whatever you like with your hair, it's your hair. but if your career is important enough to you to worry that crazy hair colors would hurt your chances of success in a professional environment then you shouldn't get crazy hair.

    we all make choices in life and some things are a priority and some things aren't. you just have to figure out where your career and cosmetics fit onto that scale lol!
    Bear in mind as well that at your present stage in your career, purple hair might not be a deal breaker. But should you want to advance your career into administration, education, etc. at some future date, the decision makers may well remember you (negatively) as "that one who had the purple hair". So you risk the loss of future career moves if you choose to go ahead with with the dye job.

  • Aug 27

    YOU may feel strongly that " hair color (or tattoos, for that matter) have absolutely nothing to do with competence or professionalism. " Your patient population.. may or may not feel differently about that.
    " I'm working for an employer that has no set hair color policy in place (and is also not referenced at all in policies " So go ahead .. come to work with pink spiked hair.. and see what develops. Especially with paranoid psych admissions.
    As for me.. when I see extremes in hair style or nose diamonds , or tattoos.. it is distracting and I then start focusing on the nose diamond thingie.

    It's your hair.. best of luck.

  • Aug 27

    I am a makeup artist on the side, and I love all forms of creative expression, including funky fashion, hair, makeup, etc. That said, my pink hair comes from a spray can or chalk that I can temporarily apply on days off and wash away in the shower. A nurse's unnatural hair colors shouldn't detract from their perceived competence and professionalism, but in reality it unfortunately does. I have no interest in changing or challenging this. I just play by the rules, minimize drama, and collect my paycheck with my dirty blonde hair.

  • Aug 27

    generally speaking if you find yourself asking if something is unprofessional, and someone you know and trust tells you it's unprofessional, it's unprofessional!

    if you don't care that crazy hair colors might negatively affect your career then you should do whatever you like with your hair, it's your hair. but if your career is important enough to you to worry that crazy hair colors would hurt your chances of success in a professional environment then you shouldn't get crazy hair.

    we all make choices in life and some things are a priority and some things aren't. you just have to figure out where your career and cosmetics fit onto that scale lol!

  • Aug 27

    I understand you to a point, because I've always liked the "crazy" colors, but never had enough nerve to try them in my youth. If I'm being honest about my opinion, though ...age 30 is too old for pink and purple hair unless you're involved in the arts and preforming on a stage somewhere.
    Your facility may not specifically disallow purple hair, but it may not have had a need to up to this point. Proceed with caution. There may be other language about "professionalism" in the dress code that's open to your manager's interpretation as well as your own.

  • Aug 27

    I suggest you get yourself involved in any "education" opportunity that comes around - Preceptor, BLS instructor, Unit skills checkoff, EHR training, .... anything. Workplace education is normally a stepwise progression. I started as an ICU preceptor then gradually began helping with inservices until I was offered the full-time unit based educator job. I began my masters at that point. I was lucky enough to climb the clinical education ladder via a series of jobs - in nursing, quality, HR/OD, and corporate roles. It's been a real adventure. But all of those jobs built on the skills, knowledge, abilities & connections I had made in the previous jobs.

    Hang in there. Make yourself visible to the decision makers & build your reputation as a highly competent go-to person with enormous capacity for adapting to new situations and willingness to take the lead whenever it is offered. You'll get there.

    Like my granny used to tell me when I upset by a sad movie .... "I don't want to spoil the ending for you, but everything will turn out OK"

  • Aug 27

    No where in the article does it talk about this man being unable to pay because of health care bills. Sounds like he wrote a bunch of bad checks and got caught. Not sure if he was trying to commit fraud or just stealing from local businesses, but either way he committed a crime and has now been assigned a penalty. Nor does a 90 day sentence seem completely unreasonable given this is portrayed as not being his first offense.

  • Aug 27

    I fail to see the connection between your title "because he can't pay hospital bill" and the article that describes a man who wrote bad checks to multiple businesses. Regardless of the health issues he faces, he still wrote bad checks to his local businesses which is grounds for penalty. I see the health issues and the bad checks as completely separate issues.

  • Aug 10

    Quote from jk2185
    Im regretting this post!
    Nah.
    These experienced guys and gals give us newer guys and gals a ton of valuable tidbits to consider. Just gotta develop a taste for the salt it's sometimes served with.


close
close