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ProfRN4, MSN 15,114 Views

Joined Apr 5, '03. ProfRN4 is a Staff Educator. She has '22' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Pediatrics'. Posts: 2,267 (22% Liked) Likes: 1,356

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  • Dec 4

    One of my colleagues just showed me what she does to keep track of her schedule. When the schedule is published in it's final form, she photographs it with her phone. Then she always has a copy of the final schedule. Subsequent schedule changes have to be addressed verbally by the person whose schedule is being changed, then initialed by a charge nurse so it unlikely that the schedule would be changed on someone without their knowledge. (Although I'll admit that in recent years, that phone call has been replaced by a text message and one could argue that "my kid was playing with my phone and answered that text -- I never saw it.)

  • Dec 4

    Not to mention every yearly review "what are your career goals" question or professional contributions. (RNperdiem)

  • Dec 4

    I like hands on care... but the only way to get a decent increase in salary is to continue your education. It's no secret that employers don't pay for experience in nursing. Also, for better working conditions... RNs have been pushed out of clinics in favor of lower cost personnel. There aren't that many positions (in my opinion) for the regular nurse that do not include nights and holidays. Education opens more doors for getting out of that. Not that working nights and holidays are horrible, but I can't blame someone for not wanting that for his entire career.

  • Nov 27

    The no show aside, you didn't describe why you don't you enjoy* nursing. Are you having a knee jerk reaction to your embarrassment or are they're specific things that substantially put you off?

    *It's too soon to know if you would enjoy nursing if you're an LPN now and BSN is your goal. You haven't yet been able to experience different roles and responsibilities. One thing I think you have to like or be able to thrive in is pressure not of your own making as you'll find that in any field in nursing or at least those you must experience before obtaining a seemingly less stressful role.

  • Nov 27

    Just check and double check from now on. I've made the opposite mistake a few times, showing up when I wasn't scheduled. Two sides of the same coin, which is not double checking your schedule. It's an occupation hazard of nursing , with its erratic schedules.

  • Nov 27

    Quote from Buyer beware
    But when the staff finds out you were just a flat out I don't give a damn NCNS that's when you really have to worry about being injured or dead.
    Simple as that.
    Your characterization of the OP is incorrect. He said he felt terrible about what happened.

  • Nov 12

    My standard text to parents....
    Dear Ms. ______, your darling child is noted as having ________ by her emergency card. EMS time to the school is ten minutes, brain death occurs after four. The best chance of a desirable outcome should 911 be called is for me to have proper tools to save your child and that must be provided by you. Thank you, MrNurse(x2)

  • Nov 12

    Quote from Chinesedog
    When you are in clinicals, you are working under another nurse's license. Not one, but two nurses brushed off the incident as nothing. And the third is telling you to drop out?? If anything, the two senior nurses should be held accountable. If they want you out of the program, they need to fail you, not tell you to drop out, that's ridiculous. But as a student nurse, I was also at the mercy of the nastiest people who never made me doubt myself or cry so much in my life.
    Honestly, you should have been taught several times about bloodborne pathogens, and if you were aware you pricked yourself, you should not have given the injection. Unless you had a very virulent communicable disease, which I'm sure you'd be aware of, a fine insulin needle is unlikely to transfer it to the patient. In any case, I'm sure the patient is fine.

    One of the the biggest myths out there. Nobody works under another person's license.

  • Oct 27

    LPN is a different role and does not bridge as easily to BSN. I would definitely consider the ADN programs though. You can do a ADN-BSN bridge and get the BSN in the same amount of time, for less money. If I was just graduating high school, this is the route I would take.

  • Oct 27

    is your grades to low that you just can't get into any college as an undeclared major. if you can get in just go undeclared andstart the college taking the nursing prerequisites and as long as you keep ur grades up you should be able to apply to the program. most students are actually pre nursing which means they aren't in the program. usually students get into nursing programs after their second year when all the gen ed. are done

  • Oct 27

    Why are community colleges out of the question? You'll have a MUCH easier time getting into a good University with some college credits under your belt (assuming good grades, of course). After you're a college student, your SAT's don't matter any more. You can circumvent all your issues (and save some money) by having community colleges as an option.

    It's not like community colleges are for dumb people, or will restrict your admittance into nursing school. The school I'm going to for my BSN has over 50% of their acceptances from the cc, instead of the university it's a part of.

  • Oct 27

    Fathers don't "babysit". They parent, just like you do.

  • Oct 22

    Hi: We adopted Collaborative Test Review several years ago and it has been very successful. Rather than having the "b*tch and moan" sessions, the students have started to take ownership. We place students into small groups (4-5) and return their test booklets to them (no scantrons are returned at this time). Everything must be cleared from the room (books, jackets, phones, pens/pencils, backpacks) and so all they have in front of them is their test booklets. We (the faculty) strategically organize the students so that there is a mixture of students with high marks and with lower marks in each group. Then we give the students anywhere from 30-45 minutes to go thru each question and discuss how and why they answered the questions the way they did. At this point, students still do not know if they answered the question correctly or not. Stronger students might have a way of thinking about answering a question that weaker students can learn from. There always is a lot of energetic discussion during this time.

    Once the students have gone thru the exam, we return the scantrons so they can see the correct answers. As faculty, there is very little for us to "defend" by this time because students have usually figured it out through their discussion.

    We've found that students really learn from this experience!

  • Oct 22

    Exams need to be reviewed. If you allow students to write things down I hope you are writing completely unique exams every semester. Which is very tough to do because you are not able to validate your questions.

    I personally review every exam. There is no recording, no writing anything down. Correct answers are given. I will do a brief explanation of high missed questions. There is no arguing with me or I will immediately end the review.

    Students can meet with me individually if they would like to take more time. Still, no writing anything down.

  • Oct 22

    I have a BSN and teach LVNs. I enjoy the flexibility. I get to get girls off the bus, I get to make my own office hours...etc., No weekends or holidays. I do clinicals, so I take students to hospitals, I do simulation labs, and I lecture. I enjoy it, it is overall pretty fullfilling.
    The negatives, I MISS THE PATIENTS in doing bedside care and going PRN would mean weekend work :/ also, students fail and unfortunately the numbers are reflective of your teaching. You can teach till you are black and blue, if the students don't do their work...they fail. Another negative is the pay and need for a PHD. I can't afford a huge debt to end off making 70k.

    I would recommend it, but I need to consider a prn role or further education.


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