Latest Comments by iluvmusak

iluvmusak 2,130 Views

Joined: Jan 9, '08; Posts: 59 (20% Liked) ; Likes: 13

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    Yes, I work at Sequoia. What surgery center are you at? I'm glad you were able to find something. It's a tough market now.

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    I hope that you are having some luck in getting your foot in the door in a surgery center. I just saw a posting on Craigslist for a PM/overnight RN - Per Diem Pre-Op/PACU RN (PM/Overnight). I work in one of Aspen's sister facilities in Walnut Creek but as far as I know, we do not have any openings. Good luck!!

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    As mentioned, no weekends/holidays/calls is a big plus. I know my workday schedule about a month in advance, however since the surgery schedules aren't finalized until the last minute, I don't know my times until the afternoon the day before.

    The ASC that I work at is very fast paced, and therefore can be very stressful. Get 'em in and get 'em out fast - usually after 1 to 1-1/2 hours. We do alot of ortho procedures so there is equipment to deal with and peripheral nerve blocks. Just like hospitals, management is trying to do more with less so often we are short staffed, so at times you could have between 1 to 3 patients, and it becomes hard to get the patients out fast. There's a lot of patient teaching with the families. Generally we feel so rushed that there's not a lot of time to sit around and chit-chat with the family - wish there was more time. Also, at times I feel that we have to push patients out too early. It really does feel like an assembly line at time.

    We do a lot of IV narcotics. Occasionally patients to arrive in the PACU with oral airways. We have also have a few codes. The scariest thing I've had to deal with was a 3 year old coding after a tonsillectomy.

    All-in-all I like working in outpatient surgery. I flip-flop between pre-op and PACU. As mentioned before, the patients are generally healthy and friendly. It's nice to see them leave "fixed" after their surgery. The environment is not as depressing as working in a hospital.

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    I work for an outpatient sc in the Bay Area. For a benefitted position, starting pay is $38/hour for 0-4 years experience. It's a little higher for a per diem rate (not sure what that is). Depending on your degrees, years of experience, etc - the rate will go up. I'm a 2nd career nurse, and my 2 degrees and years of experience in my previous field counted, so my rate was higher.

    Good luck!

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    theleaf likes this.

    Whoa!! "Snatched" and "grabbed", those are some harsh, accusatory words. The people that were able to get their shifts just took what Mollen said was available. Wouldn't most people have done the same if they saw available shifts in their area? Don't blame the nurses that are trying to get work. This frustration should be aimed at Mollen. They overhired nurses and had a lousy scheduling process. Also, if you are asking for people to kindly give up their shifts, I don't think accusing them of being grabby and cirumventing the scheduling process is the way to go.

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    Thanks. I misread the post and thought it was posted on 6/22.

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    Has the Washington Hospital new grad program for Sept 2009 already closed? I can't find any reference to it on their website. Did they already pull the listing after only a couple of days? Thanks!

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    Good luck iburnlegs!! I'm graduating from the Oakland ABSN program next week. They sure don't waste any time starting the classes. For more than $50K per person, they sure what to put as many people in as possible.

    Get ready for a wild ride. There will be a lot of stuff thrown at you very fast, but the time will fly and it will be so worth it when you are finished.

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    2lroberts likes this.

    I'm in the Oakland ABSN program and usually study on my own. I do have a study group where we divie (sp?) up study guides and do group take home tests (if we are so lucky to get them). I prefer to study on my own too. There are some people that meet in groups and study for tests. It just depends on your style. There are so many different styles of learning and different types of classmates. Don't worry . . . you won't have trouble fitting in. Everyone is very supportive of each other.

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    Thanks Rianna - I'm just a little overwhelmed w/ the amount of material that we will be tested on for MCA III. I'm having a hard time trying to retain all the info. Glad to hear that it gets easier. I'm looking forward to maternity - I'm going to be at Alta Bates. Only 2 more rotations left in CCU. Time is just flying by, but I guess that's a good thing!

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    EM-RN and StarryEyed, RN like this.

    Rianna is right . . . the bookstore is a lot higher than buying from half.com, amazon, etc. I didn't buy all my books for the classes like Intro to Nursing and Nursing Research. The library has the current textbooks that you can check out for 2 hours, and if there is an older edition of the book you can check it out for 2 weeks. I bought a few older editions that were 95% the same, and that really saved a lot of $$. I bought my Med Surg book for less than $10, whereas the new book was somewhere around $100. If the book is on the not-required list, I generally do not buy it. I barely have enough time to read the required material.

    Some of the classes are harder than others. I think that MCA III has been one of the harder classes too. I have an in-class final next week and my head is spinning. We just had the midterm 2 weeks ago, and now it's time for finals. There's so much info to learn. Rianna - does it get easier the 2nd half of the program?

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    For us, the loan applications were due before school started. I can't remember the exact details, but we must have known we were accepted first because you have to apply for the loan specific to your campus. If you decide to transfer campuses after you apply for the loan, they will not transfer your loan application. This happened to me. Each campus has their own application deadline so you should call the Financial Aid office to find out the specifics. I couldn't see anything listed on their site.

    Now it's coming back. I think we received an email from Financial Aid informing us of the loan, the applicaton URL, and the deadlines. You have to write an essay and get 2 letters of rec. If you get the loan, they want you to do your clinical rotations at Kaiser hospitals. (Although not everyone does that.)

    Good luck!

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    In Oakland and San Mateo, each cohort was awarded (10) $25 scholarships out of 48 students. The financial aid person told me that SF only had 5, and at the time I wondered why, since all the cohorts have the same number of students.

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    EM-RN likes this.

    Our clinicals assigments were based on the process that Nurse Salt described. There are 3 alphabetical groups, and each group gets a chance to be 1st during one of terms. The registrar sends out a list of the clinical sites and times, and can request your 1st, 2nd, and 3rd choice. Even though you are in the first priority group, you may not get your 1st choice if it's really popular clinical site. The registrar randomly pull names from your alphabetical group, so even if you are in the 1st priority group you are still competing w/ 16 (or so) other people for the choice spots.

    All that being said, I've heard they may revise the process for next year. The ABSN director talked with us a few months ago and said it will be changed but they haven't worked out the exact details yet. \

    You will most likely have a weekend at some point in time. Like Nurse Salt said, most clinicals are only for 5 weeks. This time 2 of our back-to-back clinicals were weekends, so that's why I'm stuck w/ 10 weeks of weekends. Anyways, time goes by fast so it'll be over before you know it.

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    EM-RN likes this.

    I'm in SMC Oakland, and we have weekend clinicals. The next 10 weeks I have clinicals on Saturday/Sunday/Monday 7am-4pm. What a bummer! I don't feel that we get better treatment than the other cohorts - there is still disorganization (with the teachers and admin), and the teachers are so-so except for a few. We do have some take home tests, but there are quite a few in-class tests too. We just had an in-class midterm a couple of days ago.

    I wouldn't say that we have it easier. The program is tough, and the workload is very intense. You start a class, and 2 weeks later there is a midterm and another 2 weeks you have a final. The teachers breeze over the material, and sometimes don't even get through the powerpoints during the lecture. Irregardless, you are still required to know the material. The speed of the classes are so fast that we don't have the time to really learn the material in-depth. Sometimes I wish I would have attended a CC program instead, but I really want a BSN.

    I would go for the location that is the most convenient for getting to the campus and clinicals.


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