Content That Chaya Likes

Content That Chaya Likes

Chaya 6,065 Views

Joined Mar 5, '03 - from 'Bosstown metro area'. He has '15' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Rehab, Med Surg, Home Care'. Posts: 1,110 (18% Liked) Likes: 467

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  • Apr 15

    Quote from westieluv
    Thanks to all of you for taking the time to reply, I really appreciate your feedback.

    I did receive an email a couple of days ago from a dialysis facility of one of the Big Two dialysis companies that is literally two minutes from my house (I have a year and a half of recent dialysis experience with that same company) and it is a dream schedule: MWF 5:30-5:30 with no weekends. I would jump on this opportunity in a New York minute except that my work ethic tells me that since I committed to the rehab position, I have to try to stay and make it work. This dialysis company was not bad at all to work for, and I regret leaving. If I had it to do over again, I would not have given up my position with them, and now they are contacting me with this position that I could almost walk to!

    It's really hard to commit to the rehab facility after being lied to, that is the problem, plus I actually did tell the dialysis manager when I replied to her email that I had accepted a position at this facility and had already worked a few days. If I contact her today and ask if she is still interested in me for the dialysis position, will she not think that I am a flip flopper and disloyal? If not, I could be tempted into pursuing the dialysis job.
    Your gut is telling you that this job is going to end up being a bad deal. You now have an opportunity in front of you to work for a company you know doing work you know on a schedule that suits your lifestyle. What is there to think about?

    Accept the dialysis job, give the rehab job notice, and move on. Why make yourself miserable? You don't owe that job anything, and it's highly unlikely that things are going to get better there.

    It's time to beat feet.

  • Apr 15

    Quote from springchick1
    Wow. You're lucky you got hired at all. This is very demanding of a potential employer and it says to me that you are not a team player.
    It says to me that she knows what she is looking for and what she is not looking for in a job. If those are her "rules", and she is willing to accept that some jobs may not be options because of that, then so be it. I don't think its fair to judge if she would be a good coworker or team player based on that though - she very possibly is a team player in other ways. We all have deal breakers, that is just one of hers.

  • Apr 15

    Quote from westieluv
    Would you work without CPR certification?
    At the acute rehab facility where I worked, all licensed nurses were required to obtain ACLS and all CNAs were required to have BLS. My former workplace did not allow nurses to set foot on the floor without at least the BLS card due to patient safety and potential liability issues.

  • Apr 15

    "Funny" you would post this as something very similar happened to me this past week..I interviewed for baylor position..was told it was only Sat/Sun, 7a-7p, great hourly rate, benefits, etc. Between the 4 weeks I interviewed/was offered the position to actually starting last week the Nurse Manager I had been in contact with and who had offered me the position suddenly "left to pursue other interests" (after 20 plus yrs at the same hospital) which I wasn't aware of until I tried to contact her to confirm orientation..about a week before..I was given 2 other people's names that were "temporarily filling in for her" - ok - Day 1 of orientation those people are no where to be found, the new Nurse Manager I had never heard of or met until then..I find out the baylor agreement will not be honored, the nurse manager I interviewed with was terminated as was the CNO and CEO (both of which had been there over 10 yrs)...all due to a buy out..the hourly rate also changed as were the hours..Unlike the original poster here I was not about to stay. Fortunately I had another job offer, not my dream job but they at least are going with what they said..so I made it clear on Day 2 of orientation if the position I was originally hired for and the original salary would not be honored I would not continue. Little did I know 2 other new hires had the same thing happen to them..all 3 of us quit on Day 2. Do I feel badly? No. The employer is as much responsible as the employee in honoring agreements when hired. To say - even when the agreement was in writing as mine was - that the needs changed, etc..isn't sufficient..if the needs changed between the job offer and orientation in my case the employer had 4 weeks to contact me and let me know so we could potentially work something out - they didn't and I was blindsided and I felt mislead. My advice to the original poster is do NOT let your dream job pass you by over this position at the rehab..there is a reason the employer lied to you and you are already seeing some of the reason why..I can't imagine it would get better and if you are starting off mistrusting the leadership and HR there that says a lot about what the future could potentially hold. Work ethic works both ways -nurses work long, hard hours in the hospital setting and others places and we have earned and deserved to be treated with professionalism and respect...

  • Apr 10

    1. incest perpetrators
    2. pedophiles
    3. borderline personality disorders
    4. snot
    5. assisting with a spinal tap
    6. the sound and feel when inadvertently hitting a bone while giving an injection...ugh!
    7. the yeasty crud under humongous breasts...eek!

  • Apr 10

    When you speak of trachs with identifiable suction goop, I think of colostomies with easily identified dinner contents. Esp if it is 'problem' colostomy, like one that has blown out or is in one of those difficult abdominal folds.

    Toenails that curl over & under. I call them '911 toenails'. I also find those ridiculously long fingernails the grossest. They look like claws on crabs/shellfish. And not to be nasty, but how do they manage hygiene when they go to the bathroom??

  • Apr 10

    Quote from LM NY
    You guys are hilarious. I am still a new nurse, but already have a few. I don't mind foley insertion that much, but when it is for a woman with excessive skin and I am literally searching and can't find it then I get a little nauseous.

    I am getting better with ostomies. I find it helpful to have extra pairs of gloves on as well as a mask. As for obese patients, that is a whole other level of annoyance. There are those that are somewhat helpful, but the ones that still have functioning legs and don't even bother assisting with moving when being cleaned bothers me.
    Ewwww, just thought of another one: Pannus yeast!

  • Apr 10

    Another one for me is pulling out a bunch of tube feed residual and having to give it back. The smell makes me almost lose it.

  • Apr 10

    Quote from Farawyn
    Eyes are Windows to the soul and why do we want to do gtts, or lazer, or slice into someone's soul.
    You speak the truth!

    The beginning to Un Chien Andalou almost made me jump out of my skin.

  • Apr 10

    It can be silly or serious. Just what task or patient type is it that really pushes your buttons irrationally?

    I can handle most any task handed to me as long as it doesn't involve dentures. I suspect this is because I had a couple different family members that would chase me around with their dentures when I was little and would use them to terrify me. To this day I just can't. I can digitally remove stool from a patient or handle their sputum and not bat an eye but if they need me to handle their dentures I have to put on the biggest of my big girl nurse panties and really put my mind in a special place to do it.

    As far as patient types go, I used to think my weakness was OBGYN and pediatrics-- but I quickly came to realize that it was just a matter of educating myself and I found myself not nervous while caring for these populations.

    But no matter how much educating myself I do, I seem to have emotional bias against obese patients and their families when they remain non-compliant and refuse to take any ownership in the position they have found themselves in. To paint a picture of the scenario I'm talking about; When you have a 40 something year old very obese patient and family who get extremely angry with the healthcare team when we aren't able to undo 40+ years of abuse done to their body with one procedure or hospital visit. When they buck and refuse nearly all of the interventions we offer (a heart healthy diet and the family sneaks in 2 fast food meals every day, non-smoking policies and the patient sneaks off the floor coming back reeking of smoke) and then get angry when they aren't in much better shape on discharge than admission. I KNOW I have this bias against this type of scenario and it takes conscious effort to ensure that I give just as good of care to them as any other patient. These patients make me irrationally angry and get under my skin like no other. I seem to take it personally when things don't go well. Again, I think much of this comes back to my own personal fears regarding my own parents being very unhealthy people and their unwillingness to acknowledge their contribution to their health problems.

    There are all kinds of patient scenarios that annoy me (asthmatic kids coming in several times a month with parent's 'unable to afford' their Rx but perfectly able to afford the cigs they chain smoke in the closed car with their kids inside) but I don't really think those are as irrational. I think MOST people would be annoyed by them. I want to know what scenarios get under your skin in a "disproportionate to stressor" type of way.

    The best thing you can do, in my opinion, is to self-acknowledge these areas and be prepared for them and make sure at the end of the day you can say that regardless of your emotions, you treated the situation as you would have treated any other situation. How do you deal with these weaknesses?

  • Apr 3

    The best way around that is a to-do list combined with a willingness for subterfuge. The med cart may be able to report when you took the meds out but perhaps not when you actually give them. If that's the case, take the meds out within parameters, make a notation on your to-do list, and then actually give them at your first opportunity. If the patient's in the bathroom, hide the meds in their room until you actually give them. Scratch off the entry on your to-do list as you get it done. Your to-do list ought to be completely obliterated by the end of shift.

    A lot of places these days require scanning a patient's wrist band to show when you gave the meds. Just get a copy of their bar code off their chart and you can scan them whenever you need to.

    There is always a way to beat the system. I'm very glad I no longer work in it. Retired without a gig mark in several years before I did retire, too.

    For those who are offended at my less than procedurally correct coping mechanisms: I didn't start the war. 7-8 med-surg patients on a day shift; 12 patients on a night shift drove me to it. I got tired of being written up for things Florence Nightingale herself couldn't have accomplished on time.

  • Apr 3

    actual legal rights, and rights as a human being can be pretty far apart. Facilities relying on video evidence for employee monitoring can be very intimidating, and interfere with workflow. At one facility there was an issue about how long a patient was on a bedpan regarding a CNA. It was a week before it was brought to my attention, and through the investigation I was grilled mercilessly, now mind you, I usually don't document what time , on a floor of 50, an aid puts someone on a bedpan. I was asked what time, and I week later I'm scratching my head...after my med pass....but before this one's PRN, so maybe x o'clock. "well the video shows you were here at x o'clock not there, but you went into this other patient's room momentarily, why" , I don't know, maybe the call bell went off. etc, etc. and I told them I heard about it, I talked to the aid, and it'll never happen again. My nerves were so wracked I could hardly work after that. and following days I was so concerned where I was when, at what time, in what order that I barely had enough headspace left to do my work.

  • Apr 1

    Concerned lady-

    I appreciate your passion on this subject matter. However, I have yet to see you present credible evidence that backs up your statements that vaccines cause autism. Several people here have given you links to proven, reputable, scientific studies that dispute your claim. Have you read those? If not, are you willing to? If not, then how can you condemn those who are not interested in seeing some pseudoscientific movie directed by someone who has been wholly discredited in the medical and scientific community? And for my own knowledge, are you a nurse?

    I don't have a neuron in me that believes vaccines cause autism. I do believe in rare cases some have adverse reactions to vaccines, some of which have lifelong effects. However, given the choice, I'd rather have a living autistic child than a dead typically developing one who died from a vaccine presentable disease.

  • Apr 1

    Conspiracy theorists don't care about science, factual data, or the sad truth that before the advent of vaccines, millions upon millions of people died from infectious disease.

  • Apr 1

    "Management response was to berate us for not using AIDET and hourly rounding which would magically fix these issues"
    This drives me nuts! Everyone always seems to ignore the obvious...it's staffing! Duh!


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