Latest Comments by konp

Latest Comments by konp

konp 2,002 Views

Joined Dec 16, '07. Posts: 16 (6% Liked) Likes: 1

Sorted By Last Comment (Past 5 Years)
  • 0

    Hello all,

    I am confused and don't know what decision to make right now, so any advise is welcome. I started an ADN program in Fall 2011 and dropped out of the program due to the stress and family problems in Fall 2012. I was in the middle of the maternity/newborn rotation. In addition, I was doing horribly in clinical to the point that I was on the verge of getting kicked out of the program. I was attending a very tough ADN program where clinical instructors were harsh and demanding during the eight hour shifts at the hospital and many students dropped out of the program due to how rigorous it is.

    After dropping out, I started working full-time. I am currently working in an office job and though I have no patient contact, it taught me people skills how to be responsible for my own work and how to work with other people. I went straight from my undergraduate study to the ADN program so I have no people skill and work experience as many working adults have in my program; I am not saying that it is necessary to have work experience but my point is the lack of the life outside of school experience prevented me from succeeding in the ADN program. My current job allows me to interact with clients and staffs on a daily basis and I learned how to communicate and how to work with other people whom I know little about (I was raised in a very sheltered environment where I did not have the opportunity to meet different people).
    I took many classes to help me be a better person and to fill up my free time outside of work. I retook the Interpersonal skill class to learn how to relate to other and be a better communicator. And currently, I am taking a medical terminology class. We went thought the terminologies for the different body systems. Next semester, I will take the second part of the medical terminology class which will cover other systems of the body. In addition, I will take the Medical Assistant Back Office class; the class will teach students how to get ready for a sterile field, injection, do urinary testing, and etc. I have been out of school for a year so the class will help me to remember the different skills that I learned during my first year in the ADN program. Plus, I want to get the medical assistant license so I can find a job at a clinic or a hospital.
    I have been volunteering in a local hospital for almost a year. It is teaching hospital so it treats the volunteers very much like students. I was on the Med-Surge floor for six months observing what RNs do and recently I was in the ICU for three months. It is in the ICU that I finally understand the role of an RN. The ICU floor was small compared to the other floor, but I had the chance to work closely with multiple RNs and watched resident & attending physicians, respiratory therapists, lab technician, x-ray technicians, and etc working together as a unit to take care of the patients. I have a better understanding of an RN role now and for the first time in my life, I actually like the profession despite how hard and physically demanding the RNs work on the ICU. I had a chance to see the different procedures in medicine and the RN's role in them. For instance, I had the chance to observe a Central line, A-line, hemodialysis, PICC line insertion, CT scan procedure, heart ultrasound. Best of all, I had the chance to see RNS performed nursing skill such as putting in an IV line, put in and take out a foley catheter, giving medication, and etc. And I have to admit, for the first time, nursing did not seem as bad and hard as how the ADN program presented it.
    I am ready to go back to nursing. My problem is I don't know if I should go back to the ADN program or start fresh at a BSN program. At where I live, employers are hiring BSN graduates over the ADN graduates due to the higher education they have. I am filling out the re-entry form for the ADN program and I don't know if I should go back; if I go back, I only have one year to complete it. The BSN program that I am looking at is a private school so the cost much higher than the ADN.
    My concern is what if graduate schools or BSN programs don't like that I took a year off. My question is should I go back to the ADN program or get my BSN. I am still young and single and I have no dependents so I have the freedom to do whatever I want. Any advice is welcome! Thank you.

  • 0

    LJohnson,

    what is your plan? are you in a nursing school? Do you plan to get into the OT career path?

  • 0

    I have a friend who finished her first semester of an ADN program and she realized that she preferred being an Occupational therapist over an RN. She is qualified to take the CNA test since she finished her Fundamental of Nursing class. Her plan is to get some rehab experience before applying for an OT program from working as a rehab nurse tech. My question is is a CNA the same as a rehab nurse tech? Or is rehab nurse tech a whole different field from being a CNA?

    Thank you.

  • 0

    Feel free to share any smart phone apps that you find it very helpful for you as a nursing student or a working RN.

    Particularly, I am looking for a good pathophysiology phone app and lab diagnostic test app. Thank you!

  • 0

    I have a difficult time remembering all my patients information during clinical. During the medical-surgical rotation, I had to go to the hospital and pick patients and I generally have all the important information regarding how the patients came to the hospital and what were the physicians' plans for them. I had three patients in my last med-surgical rotation and I found myself to have a difficult time remembering the pts' info and I fumbled with my SBAR and lab sheets many times to look for their info when I gave a report to my instructor for each patient. A classmate of mine said that she read off the pts' info from the SBAR page and the instructor seemed to be fine with that. However, another classmate of mine seemed to have all the pts' info memorize by heart and she gave her reports to the instructors without fumbling; I mean she referred back to the lab sheet now and then since she could not memorize the lab values for her patients at time. But when I tried to imitate her, it was close to impossible.

    My question is do I have to memorize all the patients' information when I give report to my instructors? OR is that optional?
    For working nurses out there, do you generally remember all of your pts' report? if yes, how do you remember the pts' information.

  • 0

    Whenever I give a blood pressure medications such as ACE inhibitors or a lasix, the nurse always would tell me to take my patients' blood pressure before hand. At times, some patients' BP would be 110/90 which is something that I consider as normal. I understand that I still give the medications since these medications are helping the patients to manage their BP. My problem is that the nurse would ask me what is the patients's baseline BP and I have know idea how to find that out. How do I know a pt's baseline? do I look at the pt's BP and calculate the average; it's ridiculous to me that I have to calculate the average since I don't have time to do that during clinical.

    Same goes for the other VS as well. How do I know what is the baseline for the temp, pulse, respiratory rate, and pain.

  • 0

    I am planning to apply to nursing schools. Do you know any legit websites that have a list of all the nursing schools in the US? I don't mind if the website has ADN, BSN, and MSN. I just need a complete list so I can see what are my options out there.

    thank you.

  • 1
    Joe V likes this.

    I am in an ADN program and is passing the lecture portion of the class, but my communication is turning my experience during clinical into a bad one. English is my second language and I have a difficult time getting English words in my mouth. During clinical today, I told my instructor that I would be giving "glucose" when I was about to give insulin to a patient and my instructor corrected me. I am so upset with myself for not speaking clearly and for reacting this way. I don't want to quit nursing school because my communication skill is not great. I am about to finish my first year in 2 weeks and I don't want to quit because my communication skill is horrible.

    Also, I don't know how to manage my time during clinical. I am in the med-surge rotation right now and I can give medications on time and charting other things, but when it comes to doing activities of daily living such as giving bedbath, making bed, and doing other things, I seem to never finish them on time. I only have 3 patients and the shift is from 0615- 1245. My other classmates can do it and I find myself to have a hard time do these work.

    I DON'T want to quit nursing school just because I can't manage my time and can't communicate clearly .

  • 0

    In my ADN nursing program, we discussed what is a secondary IV bag (or what my instructors called IV Piggy Bag), but how my instructor is making us calculating an IV drip medication. What is exactly an IV drip medication? is it the same thing as IV piggy bag?

  • 0

    hi everyone,

    i need anadvice on when should i take the acls, pals, and ekg classes. i am in a 2 year associate degree nursing program and i just finish one semester last december. do you think i should take the acls, pals, ekg, and nrp classes during my second semester? i heard that those classes can be a bit challenging if i don't have enough knowledge or a newbies in nursing. for instance, someone said that for the ekg classes, it's better if i know the cardiac dysrhythmias and meds and i don't i took pharmacology and knows a lot of meds, but when it comes to the cardiovascular system, i know little about it. i read countless of threads about the acls and pals classes on this website, but most of people who asked those questions are either almost finish their nursing program or is working. any input is welcome !

    thanks.


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