Latest Likes For CoffeeRTC

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CoffeeRTC, BSN 14,367 Views

Joined Jan 22, '03. CoffeeRTC is a RN LTC. Posts: 3,524 (23% Liked) Likes: 1,520

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  • 11:49 am

    I work in an extremely busy LTC, often times understaffed. I've been in LTC for 20 years. I'm good at what i do and know what I need to do. Everyday is stressful, some day's I'd like to scream and actually do. I get paid a very comfortable rate. My point....I like what I do. I thrive on the stress and business at work. I manage the stress and probably wouldn't know what do do without it.

    Is that crazy? Probably. I've been at the same place for those 20 years and have worked at other places PT and PRN. I get bored at the "less stressful" places.

    Bottom line.....love what you do. At least have a strong like for it!

  • Sep 30

    Well, that just about covers my facility. Our acuity varies. The CHF patient with fluids and hypocalemia...that would have put me over the top due to the constant need to monitor. This patient should have been sent to the hospital for closer monitoring. Sad, but this it what a good bit of LTCs are looking like.

  • Sep 30

    Well, that just about covers my facility. Our acuity varies. The CHF patient with fluids and hypocalemia...that would have put me over the top due to the constant need to monitor. This patient should have been sent to the hospital for closer monitoring. Sad, but this it what a good bit of LTCs are looking like.

  • Sep 30

    It all depends.

    I'm a LTC nurse and some days I want to run for the hill. Head over to the LTC forum and read some of the posts to give you an idea how LTC has changed. 10 years ago, I would have said that LTC would be a gentle transition back to nursing, but now days, many of the LTCs are understaffed and have higher acuity residents with a high patient to nurse ratio.

    If your goal is to get back into acute care, I think you should look there instead of a LTC. In the hospital setting you will be given and orientation and preceptor to get you back on your feet. LTC..maybe a few days of training if you are luck.

  • Sep 30

    It all depends.

    I'm a LTC nurse and some days I want to run for the hill. Head over to the LTC forum and read some of the posts to give you an idea how LTC has changed. 10 years ago, I would have said that LTC would be a gentle transition back to nursing, but now days, many of the LTCs are understaffed and have higher acuity residents with a high patient to nurse ratio.

    If your goal is to get back into acute care, I think you should look there instead of a LTC. In the hospital setting you will be given and orientation and preceptor to get you back on your feet. LTC..maybe a few days of training if you are luck.

  • Sep 29

    i work in a much more laid back area of LTC nursing, well sometimes it is LTC and a lot of times it is more short term rehab. For the most part, I love finding out if there is a nurse or someone with a good medical or nursing background in the family. Right now, we have a few nurses as patients and it really makes things easier. I still do all the teaching I would do with a "lay" person, but it is just different.

    In LTC and other home type of settings it is often the nurse who is explaining the procedures, coming up with a nursing diagnosis and then telling the doctors what we need or what they need to look at. Working with the patient or family member with the background makes things flow better. .....well after the initial culture shock of LTC!

    Me....I hide the fact I'm a nurse unless it comes down to being needed. I'm not versed in ICU or critical care and my only experience with L and D comes from having 5 babies and I'm not even going to begin to think I'm up with onocology BUT...I'm always up to be a supportive family member and help my loved one with ADLs etc.

  • Sep 18

    Quote from Barnstormin' PMHNP
    I enjoy the posts that have a patient that the Nurse is looking for input on from the other nurses on this board. I am always amazed and fascinated at the clinical knowlege that the many different posters have and how there are so many aspects to patient care. I think that is why the psuedo articles that disguise themselves as clinical facts frustrate me so much. I love nursing and respect the knowlege of my peers and do not like to see this disrespect to the intelligence of nurses.
    This!! I love a good case study too!

  • Sep 14

    I brought candy bars in to sell to the staff at work. (we have a loose policy on this) and felt funny when a resident insisted on buying one. (this was LTC). I got bullied into it by them "Listen, I am already on my way to the vending machine so I either buy it from you and support your kids school or give it to the "man" LOL.

  • Sep 13

    I've worked in a small 50 bed facility that was owned by a for profit big chain and then changed to a small not for profit owned facility. I miss the big for profit so bad!!! With a corporation, there are clearly indicated chain of command, policies and procedures ordering practices, manuals.....etc. So so much with the smaller not for profit. There are different consultants for everything.

    I've also worked in a few facilities that were around 200 beds. I like my little facility better. We know our residents and families. Staff is tighter knit too.

  • Sep 12

    Ahh...I re-read this and when you say " i didn't bother looking" did you mean looking for meds to borrow or for the actual resident in question?

    You are correct in not wasting time looking for the meds from the other residents. Supervisor should have when to your emergency box to get the meds. We are not permitted to borrow meds. Yeah, in the bunch card system we might still do this, but it is wrong.

    Treat any order for controlled substances extra carefully. Always double check if you have a question or the order doesn't seem right. You can never go wrong when you do this.

  • Sep 12

    Wait, is it every time you give the med? or just at shift change?

    Can you ask your pharmacy services about "the reg"?

  • Sep 12

    Once you get into a routine, it will be okay. Moving around from place to place with out LTC background could be tough. Your ICU skills will be useful when assessing residents. Things get missed without a careful eye! Other skills will be used too...we start our own IVs and do a good bit of off hour blood draws!
    Good luck!

  • Sep 10

    Ahh...I re-read this and when you say " i didn't bother looking" did you mean looking for meds to borrow or for the actual resident in question?

    You are correct in not wasting time looking for the meds from the other residents. Supervisor should have when to your emergency box to get the meds. We are not permitted to borrow meds. Yeah, in the bunch card system we might still do this, but it is wrong.

    Treat any order for controlled substances extra carefully. Always double check if you have a question or the order doesn't seem right. You can never go wrong when you do this.

  • Sep 10

    I brought candy bars in to sell to the staff at work. (we have a loose policy on this) and felt funny when a resident insisted on buying one. (this was LTC). I got bullied into it by them "Listen, I am already on my way to the vending machine so I either buy it from you and support your kids school or give it to the "man" LOL.

  • Sep 9

    Ahh...I re-read this and when you say " i didn't bother looking" did you mean looking for meds to borrow or for the actual resident in question?

    You are correct in not wasting time looking for the meds from the other residents. Supervisor should have when to your emergency box to get the meds. We are not permitted to borrow meds. Yeah, in the bunch card system we might still do this, but it is wrong.

    Treat any order for controlled substances extra carefully. Always double check if you have a question or the order doesn't seem right. You can never go wrong when you do this.


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