Latest Comments by HolisticNurse97

HolisticNurse97 909 Views

Joined Oct 26, '07. Posts: 5 (20% Liked) Likes: 1

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    FrogBugs likes this.

    "Have you met the hospitals new infection control nurse yet?!"

  • 0

    Quote from [URL="http://allnurses.com/#"
    IceGuy[/URL];6856367]Anyone have any advice for per Diem nursing? Benefits and drawbacks? I've been offered a job as a per Diem nurse on a unit I love and wanted to know what people's thoughts are on it?
    I worked for 6 yrs at a hospital full-time, now I am looking at per diem positions mainly to have more flexibility.
    With that said the largest downfall will be when work is slow and there are no shifts available.
    Most places want you to commit to a certain number of weekend and holiday shifts as well. So there goes the "flexibility" if you work in a facility that requires that, unless you do not mind weekend and holiday shifts. The other con is you may not be included in regular staff meetings and decision making that will effect your position.

    And of course..no benefits.

    The pro's (for me) are, can decide if I can work a shift, am able to communicate with the staff and let them know when I am looking for hours and what weekends I would be available etc.. the hourly pay rate is usually higher. I still have to go to all the mandatory training and in services, sometimes that is my only hours. I also have the flexibility to look at other options in nursing and continue education if I desire (at my own expense..no employee benefit).


    If you do not need the benefits and can afford to not work for extended periods at a time it is a lot better than having to take what you get with the weekly schedule of a full-time nurse.

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    Quote from elkpark
    I'm curious about why your friend's "elderly mother" isn't on Medicare? This story sounds extremely fishy to me -- sort of like all the stories of how people are dying in the streets from lack of care in Canada and the other countries with universal coverage.
    She was cut from Medicaid...no coverage at all any longer with that...she does have Medicare, which she had to pay a $4000.00 deductable for a hospital admission plus she no longer has all her perscriptions covered as she did with Medicaid. Medicare is cutting payment through reducing benefits for the elderly and a reduction on reimbursment to hospitals. What IS fishy about that is that medicare is making cuts to benefits, their cuts are not making healthcare affordable.

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    I'm curious about why your friend's "elderly mother" isn't on Medicare? This story sounds extremely fishy to me -- sort of like all the stories of how people are dying in the streets from lack of care in Canada and the other countries with universal coverage.

    She was cut from medicaid...no coverage at all any longer with that...she does have Medicare, which she had to pay a $4000.00 deductable for a hospital admission plus she no longer has her perscriptions covered as she did with medicaid. Medicare is cutting payment through reducing benefits for the elderly and a reduction on reimbursment to hospitals. What IS fishy about that is that medicare is making cuts to benefits, their cuts are not making healthcare affordable.

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    quote from: mbarnbsn: "i have yet to meet one in person that agrees. i also have yet to meet a person living and working in massachusetts that hates his/her government-run health program."

    i just had a recent conversation with a friend who's elderly mother has had her healthcare benefits cut she also has a huge deductable ($4000.00) leaving her to pay 100% of her perscription medications. she, by the way, lives in massachusetts.

    this quote below is from this article consumer power report: in massachusetts, government-run health care forever | heartlander magazine

    "in massachusetts, the ramifications of then-governor mitt romney's health care law are clear: more people are covered (though not everyone), the overwhelming number of whom are taxpayer-subsidized, by health insurance; access is an increasingly troublesome issue; and costs have only continued to rise."

    tax payer subsidized healthcare??? i wouldn't mind having a health insurance policy that "someone else paid for & i had no deductable or co-pays either. but that is not reasonable, it is a system that is failing.

    there are a few details of the affordable healthcare act that i do agree with, such as children being covered through their parents until 26 yrs of age, and for pre-existing conditions. it is our prior disfunctional system that has cause both of those details to be an issue in the first place, namely greedy health insurance companies given such control over healthcare. young adults should have access to their own insurance without the need to forfiet and entire weeks pay, and pre-existing conditions should have never been a reason for decline in payment. we do need affordable health care, maybe universal healthcare is the answer, but the way it is being transitioned right now is neither affordable or equally universal to all.

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    quote from: MBARNBSN: "I have yet to meet one in person that agrees. I also have yet to meet a person living and working in Massachusetts that hates his/her government-run health program."

    I just had a recent conversation with a friend who's elderly mother has had her healthcare benefits cut she also has a huge deductable ($4000.00) leaving her to pay 100% of her perscription medications. She, by the way, lives in Massachusetts.

    This quote below is from this article Consumer Power Report: In Massachusetts, Government-Run Health Care Forever | Heartlander Magazine

    "In Massachusetts, the ramifications of then-Governor Mitt Romney's health care law are clear: more people are covered (though not everyone), the overwhelming number of whom are taxpayer-subsidized, by health insurance; access is an increasingly troublesome issue; and costs have only continued to rise."

    Tax payer subsidized healthcare??? I wouldn't mind having a health insurance policy that "someone else paid for & I had no deductable or co-pays either. But that is not reasonable, it is a system that is failing.

    There are a few details of The Affordable Healthcare Act that I do agree with, such as children being covered through their parents until 26 yrs of age, and for pre-existing conditions. It is our prior disfunctional system that has cause both of those details to be an issue in the first place, namely greedy health insurance companies given such control over healthcare. Young adults should have access to their own insurance without the need to forfiet and entire weeks pay, and pre-existing conditions should have never been a reason for decline in payment. We do need affordable health care, maybe universal healthcare is the answer, but the way it is being transitioned right now is neither affordable or equally universal to all.

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    Quote from Omibashu
    I graduated from nursing school with a BSN in May 2010. Nursing was my second career and I didn't start nursing school until I was 40 years old. I was in an accelerated BSN program in Los Angeles and found a job quickly out of school.

    I worked on the floor for 8 months before moving to the OR which is where I thought I wanted to be. I only lasted in the OR for 15 months.

    I am now working at another hospital in an administrative position and am starting to regret my decision to leave clinical nursing.

    I am seriously considering trying to move back into the clinical arena but I know that I cannot go back to working on a regular med/surg floor or working in a busy OR. I am afraid that my lack of solid experience in nursing may hinder my efforts.

    Has anyone else left clinical nursing early in their career and tried to return to the clinical setting?

    Any advice or insight would be greatly appreciated.

    Have you considered acute rehab or skilled nursing? The patients in both of these areas are not always stable but not always unstable either. You will need to develope and draw upon your clinical knowledge and critical thinking skills in both areas. I am not sure where you are geographically or how any particular facility operates, there are a ot of places with CNAs who administer medications now that would require the RN to over see them, some RNs are not to comfortable with that. In skilled and subacute care you will certainly use your clinical skills and improve upon them (you pretty much are the eyes and ears, doctors don't routinely round dailylike a med surg floor) but the pace is different. I don't want to bore you with a long drawn out response, I hear where you are coming from. Have more to offer if you want a sounding board.



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