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Scrubby 7,019 Views

Joined Oct 18, '07 - from 'Australia'. Scrubby is a Clinical Nurse. She has '6' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Operating Room Nursing'. Posts: 1,392 (51% Liked) Likes: 2,120

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  • Mar 9

    Anyway you should not become a nurse if your too judgemental. Of course nurses are entitled to personal opinions but as we live in a diverse society we should respect other peoples values and belief systems.

    You should not become a nurse if you have no idea what nursing is about. Do your research first to see if nursing is for you. It's not glamourous like Grey's Anatomy it is hard work and a lot of stress and tears.

    You should not become a nurse if you cannot stick up for yourself. Nurses need to be assertive so we can advocate for our patients. Research also shows that there is lateral violence in nursing and if you don't want to be the next meal you have to be able to stand up for youself.

  • Jan 20

    Quote from TiredMD
    Bingo. If this wasn't the admitting physician, there was no reason to call that late. It's just completely inappropriate. This isn't a case of a "rude doctor", it's a rude nurse. Would the OP have called a family member that late to ask the same question? And I wonder, if a telemarketer had called the OP that late, if maybe they wouldn't have done a little yelling too?
    I completely disagree with your comments TiredMD.

    For starters your comparing a nurse who is concerned about a patient's medication to a telemarketer. Do I need to explain the difference to you?

    And the OP wasn't being rude. They wanted to do the right thing by their patient and they were following the hospital policy.

    This is a case of a rude doctor. Yelling and screaming at someone is rude behaviour, or at least it is where I come from.

    The OP is a new nurse and will learn when to call a doctor late and when it can wait until morning. Bad behaviour by doctors is hardly a great way to go about retaining graduate nurses.

    Oh and as for yelling doctors well I either turn my back on them, hang up the phone, sometimes I even laugh in their face. But I never apologise or act submissive...EVER.

  • Jan 19

    A good scout should always be paying attention to the needs of the scrub team. For example, If we're doing a laparoscopic case and things are going pear shaped then they should be prepared for the patient to be opened up. Sponges, suction, ties, sutures, laparotomy retractors etc.

    If the surgeon needs an instrument or something and it's not on the back table then the scout should be listening and anticipating what will be required. I hate having to repeat everything that the surgeon asks for, it's like playing monkey's telephone.

    One thing I loathe is the scout nurse interrupting the surgeon while he is operating to dictate some irrelevant phone message. If it's not urgent then why are you being a secretary? It's OR etiquette to ask the scrub nurse if it's ok to interrupt. I have a very strict rule in my OR that phone calls are not our responsibility. Did you study to become a nurse or a secretary?

  • Dec 30 '15

    Quote from Annieh1315
    Thank you for your feedback. It is never fair to apply generalizations to an individual or make generalizations about a population based on an individual - and so to prevent doing that, I would like to say that meant nothing negative to anyone in particular. It just stung a bit to hear complaints about families after being treated rudely myself. I wanted to offer an alternate viewpoint - not to criticize anyone.

    Again, most of the nurses that I have met are wonderful creatures. I grew up around nurses (behind my mother's skirt so to speak) and know that their personalities are as unique as people in general and represent all of the admirable and not so admirable qualities of the same.

    I apologize if my post was taken as personal criticism, it was certainly not meant that way.
    Sometimes when your having a busy shift (pretty much every shift) and there are too many family members present, even if your not obnoxious to the nurse your still creating problems for the nurse. I have found that family members make it hard for the nurse to take vital signs, get meds out of the bedside cabinet (this is where they are kept at my hospital) and it is quite annoying that they don't move to get out of the nurses way. It makes our job more awkward and after a while you get to resent all family members

    Also even the nicest family member can be disruptive to other patients. We have 6 bed bays at my hospital and you get families that come in huge groups and keep other patients awake, talk too loudly and yes get in the way. I guess thats my biggest annoyance is family getting in the way.

    Another thing family members tend to do is answer a question that is asked of the PATIENT. I used to ask the patient 'what procedure are you going to have today' when they were still with their family. I no longer do this because I'm tired of the relative answering. I know people do it to be helpful but please don't. You are really taking away the patients autonomy by doing this and we need feedback from them not you.

    Anyway that's my honest opinion. If you want to make our lives easier, please give us access to the patient and move out of the way, be respectful to other patients and keep the volume down, don't ask silly questions when we are clearly busy.

    Oh and as for nurses should look after the patients families I completely disagree with this whole concept. We have enough work to do without having to look after 6 patients and their endless relatives. It may sound great at nursing school that nurses should also care for family members, but how on earth can a nurse with a full patient load, post operative patients etc even begin to help sort out the patients family? I'm not saying that we should just ignore the relatives, but IMHO this is where counselling services and other liason services should step in.

  • Dec 19 '15

    What I'd love to say to annoying patients and their relatives:

    "Go stand in the naughty corner and have a good think about your behaviour".

  • Dec 5 '15

    Quote from ohcomeon
    I also wanted to add, that I am fairly certain that the patient did not hear what the nurse said. Thank God! I will speak with my instructor about this on Tuesday. I realize that it's the best thing to do. Thanks for all the advice guys!
    The patient may not have heard it this time but who knows what she's said around this patient and others before? Patients come pick up a lot about our body language as well and it sounds like this nurse has a horrible attitude about her.

  • Dec 5 '15

    I agree that this nurse needs to be reported. Someone who can make comments like that shouldn't be working in the healthcare industry.

    I once witnessed a nurse say something in the OR that had me quite literally shaking with rage. (Thankfully she's now a rep for a medical product company). It's hard to believe that a nurse can make these kinds of insensitive remarks about a vulnerable patient.

  • Nov 26 '15

    Quote from TiredMD
    Bingo. If this wasn't the admitting physician, there was no reason to call that late. It's just completely inappropriate. This isn't a case of a "rude doctor", it's a rude nurse. Would the OP have called a family member that late to ask the same question? And I wonder, if a telemarketer had called the OP that late, if maybe they wouldn't have done a little yelling too?
    I completely disagree with your comments TiredMD.

    For starters your comparing a nurse who is concerned about a patient's medication to a telemarketer. Do I need to explain the difference to you?

    And the OP wasn't being rude. They wanted to do the right thing by their patient and they were following the hospital policy.

    This is a case of a rude doctor. Yelling and screaming at someone is rude behaviour, or at least it is where I come from.

    The OP is a new nurse and will learn when to call a doctor late and when it can wait until morning. Bad behaviour by doctors is hardly a great way to go about retaining graduate nurses.

    Oh and as for yelling doctors well I either turn my back on them, hang up the phone, sometimes I even laugh in their face. But I never apologise or act submissive...EVER.

  • Nov 25 '15

    I remember my first needlestick, happening when i was scrubbed in the middle of a procedure and i was so scared i started crying and someone had to scrub in for me

    You do learn from these mistakes though, hope it all works out for you...



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