Latest Comments by dazyRN

dazyRN 1,586 Views

Joined Jun 20, '07. Posts: 30 (30% Liked) Likes: 14

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    imintrouble and CloudySky like this.

    What is your role? Are you the charge nurse or staff nurse? Regardless of your role if you work with her and know this is going on you are obligated to report it. It would make me wonder what else she does that noone else knows about.

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    The University of Texas at Arlington is an excellent program but they do not take LVN nurses. You would need to get an associtate degree first.

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    The hospital I work at uses staff locator devices. It is a small device that nurses and techs wear like they do their badge. Through a centrally located monitor on the unit a staff member can be found any where they are in the hospital. Hil Rom provides them.

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    If you are interveiwing on a telemetry unit it would be wise to be able to answer questions about the tele strips. Know the rhythms and what you would do if a patient converted from normal sinus rhythm to a-fib for example. Also don't hesitate to brag a little bit about yourself and tell them how much you have learned and what you are able to do. They might ask why they should hire you and what you have to offer to the unit.

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    This needs to be reported to the state board of nursing!!!!!

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    What subject have you been teaching? If the medical field is new to you you should become a CNA, LPN, and then an RN. CNA do not have as much responsibility as LPN's and LPN's do not have as much responsibility as RN's. Gradual progression would ensure a better understanding.

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    Have you ever had to give report to a really really mean nurse and they try to get the day nuses to do have their work or for them befor the day shift can leave,

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    I just sent them a thank you note. Is that appropriate? I am so anxious. I really do want this job.

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    Yesterday I had a job interview. It last about 45 minutes. There were 3 nurse managers interviewing me and I think I did quite well. They said I am definetly qualified. When they asked me a question I answered right away. One question was about the discharge planning for the patient. I think I provided an answer that they were looking for. They wanted me to say that I would call the social worker to arrange rehab, snu, home-health, or home without home-health.

    I felt pretty good about it until one of the managers said they had 14 other nurses they were interviewing for the same position and they would let me know something in 2 weeks. Will I get the job or not????????

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    ebear likes this.

    .....

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    As a nurse it is our duty to teach and educate our patients on their health issues. Obesity, smoking, CHF, and DM are all diseases that we should discuss with those patients that it applies to. If we do not teach them about this then we have failed them.

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    Orange Tree and skittlebear like this.

    Nursing is a very stressful career. I was a victim of high stress when I began my career in the 1990's. I have decided that I am only one person and can only do one thing at a time. Your co-workers have to pitch in and help sometimes. Also, the nurse has to have a routine that you stick to during your shift. If distractions occur, and they always do, talk to who ever you need to talk to then refocus on you daily routine during your shift. I come in in the mornings, get my coffee, sit down and get report, visit with my co-workers for a few minutes, then go to each of my patient's rooms to check on them. If they are ok then I will go to the pyxis to get their morning medications. Then one by one I go to the room, assess my patient, and give them their medication. Then its on the the next room. After wards I sit down and chart my assessments. But getting on a routine and sticking with it helps. Yes there will be interruptions and something totally unexpected will happen but as soon as the crises past get right back in to your same routine. And practice smiling and be pleasant and friendly. Then your coworkers wont mind helping you if needed.

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    That was cool. Lets never forget how important our family and friends are.

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    I got my BSN in May 2010. They really pushed jobs such as management, supervisor, or case-manager after getting the BSN. They said I would be so much more qualified for those positions and that if I just had the ADN I would not be able to get a position like those. Here I am 5 months later still in the same position I was when I had the ADN degree. I still work as a staff nurse. I am in the master's program now and hoping to get a leadership position but I think I am going to have to wait until I get my master's degree before I will qualify for the positions I really want.

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    holly123 likes this.

    Congrats on your interview. Managers look for nurses that think positively, are enthusiactic about work, that don't complain (much), and get along well with co-workers. They want to know that you can do the job. There maybe times that you need help with something. In the interview say that there may be somethings that you are unsure of, if you are, and that you would ask for help if needed.

    Managers look for strong workers physically, mentally, and pyschologically. They want to know that they are not turning an incompetent unfit, out-of-shape nurse loose on the floor that is going to get tired and gripy and be difficult to work with. Also, they may ask what you would do if you are caught up on your work but your co-worker is behind. They want to know that you would help them.

    Pray for guidance, wisdom, direction, Approach the interview knowing that the grace of God is with you and is guiding.


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