Latest Comments by frankie

frankie 2,135 Views

Joined Oct 2, '02. Posts: 139 (0% Liked)

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    Hi ageless and telepathic - frankie here - I work in an out patient infusion center. I have been asked to declot hemodialysis catheters, as they have been being sent to ONE DAY SURGERY - can you believe that - the ED nor inpatient IV team will declot the catheters. I am well versed in the venous side, but I have only flushed the arterial side - never declotted it. So, I know with the correct inservice, competency , etc... It is within my scope of practice, but I wanted input from other RNs who do this daily. thanks a bunch - frankie

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    hello - frankie here - thanks thanks thanks for the info - it is very helpful - frankie

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    Question - Is there a procedure for decloting hemodialysis catheters? Do RNs to this? Help? - frankie

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    Question for RNs - If it is within the scope of nursing practice in your state, do RNs declot hemodialysis catheters (permacaths)? and If yes, where could I find procedure for declotting the arterial side? Many Thanks - frankie

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    Renerian, frankie here - I am sorry you experienced such a thing - people are so rude and thoughtless. I enjoy reading your posts and your replies to everyone. I do not post much here, and I am new, but I agree with the others -report this and forget it. You are too good to let this get you down. frankie

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    Canoehead - Frankie here. If there is a program for a medical condition that includes labs, meds, and other tasks that requires a physician order to execute, this should have been reviewed and approved by an administrator in nursing, and the medical director (physician) associated with this program. If indeed, someone is pressing you to talk with the docs, that is probably OK - if you have time. This is NOT high on patient care priority issues. The administrative nurse, and/or the medical director should be addressing the problems of physicians not following pathways. On the other hand, if your supervisor has dreamed up this plan on her/his own, then you and your coworkers should discuss this with him/her. This is not a valid reason to disciplin a nurse. Until you could talk with the supervisor, I would say - document, document, document all issues and conversations related to this issue. - frankie

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    NRSKarenRN - frankie here - great article. it is hard for me to imagine anyone using a needle more than once. The cost is so minimal. HOW CHEAP ARE THESE PEOPLE? Glad this place was shut down, though the patients are the ones that suffer. frankie
    :stone

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    Hello everyone-frankie here. Question - You ask for a raise because you have assumed management duties on your unit, acepted the responsibility and accountability for scheduling, day to day operation, coordination of care. Your manager says, I can't give you a raise, but I can give you a special arrangement - ex. If you want a day off, and you have been working hard, I won't use leave time, I will just pay you. Ethical? or Lacking personal integrity to say yes? frankie

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    Jen, Frankie here. For me, the worst two things in nursing are:
    1. Vomit
    2. In 30 years, you will make, within about 3-4 dollars an hour, the same hourly wage that a new graduate, who has not passed state boards, and is still in orientation makes. And there is nothing you can do about this, unless you change within the profession.

    frankie

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    Obnurseheather, frankie here. i would be a np any day. why not build on the career you are invested in rather than start anew? If you are looking to exit nursing, PA might be the route to take, however there would be more limitations in licensing and practice. frankie

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    Hi Andrewsgranny, frankie here- and I was born and bred in NOLA otherwise know as New Orleans, Louisiana. About the armadillos, I found out at girl scout camp when I was about 11 yr old, those little guys will urinate in your hair too. And it smells awful. In New Orleans, a median strip in the road is called a neutral ground; you do not buy groceries, you "make" groceries as in "Red, where yat? I goin to da Schwagman's to make groceries. Ya better tell me now what kinda beer ya want to watch doz stinkin aints on the TEEVEE tomorrow." Every Monday, you eat red beans and rice, hopefully with pickled bannana peppers. You don't whistle dixie, you drink dixie- a word of caution -NEVER DRINK DIXIE LITE - you will partially die, and require recussitation. And being the very catholic town that NOLA is, everyone respects the "holy triligy" - onions, celery, green bell peppers - can't cook without them. If you are from Chalmette -the parish or god's country - you are a chalmation if male, and a chalmeteeze if female. The indians in NOLA are african american, wear silk headresses with sequins and feathers, parade on mardi gras day and on the feast of st. joseph (3/19). Just a few notes off the top of my head - and i have been gone from NOLA 3 years and i am homesick now - frankie

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    Karo nurse - and everyone - frankie here. by now, you guys know i work in iv therapy, but a clinic, not an iv team. when i worked in hospital, i always started my own ivs. i can see how an iv team has merrit - picc/ml insertion. decisions about which line for which drug based on patient assessment, pH of med, osmolality, and all that rot....but if the iv team doesn't act as a resource for the above and other iv matters, then why have them?

    in the clinic, we are very open to assisting nurses in other areas of ambulatory care - oncology, rad. onc. , same day surgery, blood draws from ports/cvls that the lab techs can't do. so, we help our fellow units when possible. we will even go into surgery and insert a picc for patient while sedated - per MD request. and of course, we have to have enough staffing that day.

    the iv team in hospital is not very responsive to the staff. they are not responsive to us. we want to have a smooth transition from in to out patient, but communication is rigid. the iv team in house is rigid. that's the big problem. if they could be a little more flexible, i think the hospital staff would appreciate them more. frankie

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    Qnurse, Frankie here. So sorry you did not get the suggestions in time. It sounds like you have done a few things to make the week brighter for the hosptial. Changing the topic - I was just in the Cayman Islands in July - wonderful place. Plan to return. Going to Nassau in a few weeks. Frankie

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    ISEARL - Frankie here. Sorry you lost you home infusion job. It is really a great job - most of the time. I have to say, this clinic thing is nice. The first six months were difficult - alot of hospital changes. I wanted to leave. But then - things got real good. We have great patients, excellent RNs, good pharmacy techs. It is unusual working for pharmacy - but...I have seen stranger things in my time. I do not think there are many infusion suites not run by nursing depts. We have alot of autonomy, but we also have tremendous responsibility and accountability. We all best know of what we speak, because the PharmD will ask - where did you get your info, and don't say the drug company? So..if you like researching new stuff, variety, good pay, some on-call, a few home visits- we have a 0.6 FTE now! frankie

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    Renerian, Frankie here. I feel angry about your situation. Probably not as angry as you do. What kind of case management job? A nurse just transfered from our IV out patient clinic to a case management/discharge planner job in the hospital - she makes $30 per hour. Exempt employee.
    Frankie


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