Latest Comments by hherrn

hherrn 13,543 Views

Joined Jun 13, '07. Posts: 1,051 (71% Liked) Likes: 3,760

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  • 3

    Quote from BostonFNP
    I am exactly the opposite. I want so bad for this to be a real story.
    Do you think it is?
    I am skeptical. Nonetheless, a great story.

  • 11
    Orca, Davey Do, OsceanSN2019, and 8 others like this.

    Quote from zynnnie
    Update, the nurse just called me and said that they are upset we took Doctors candy cos it was not for us to eat. That since they need nurse they will not fire her and since they will not fire her they can't fire nobody. So ladies and gentlemen , my nurse just saved the day, if this was just me an ordinary tech, they would have fired me over candy. The nurse offered to pay for the candy since they are so pained about it. I hope my own panel will go well and at lest termination is out of the way.
    Good luck with your panel. I would think that, as an attorney, you wouldn't be overly concerned about facing a panel regarding accidental candy ingestion. Do they know you are a lawyer? Why not just casually drop terms like "unlawful termination" and "harassment"? Even if you no longer have a license to practice law, any "panel" in a hospital will surely not try and take advantage of somebody with your level of knowledge and education.

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  • 13

    These are great references showing some of the damage we do buy eating commercial high sugar foods. And, the link between diet and inflammation becomes more important as we learn more about the relationship of inflammation and disease.

    I don't think there is any question about how harmful our food choices are.

    But, when I looked for some reliable information about some of the premises of your OP, like retained toxins needing to be flushed, it was hard finding credible experts without a financial interest.

    I found that Dr Oz supports this approach.

    I did find some credible experts who also doubt the cleansing idea.

    Let's be clear," says Edzard Ernst, emeritus professor of complementary medicine at Exeter University, "there are two types of detox: one is respectable and the other isn't." The respectable one, he says, is the medical treatment of people with life-threatening drug addictions. "The other is the word being hijacked by entrepreneurs, quacks and charlatans to sell a bogus treatment that allegedly detoxifies your body of toxins you're supposed to have accumulated."

    " "Detox" is a case of a legitimate medical term being turned into a marketing strategy – all designed to treat a nonexistent condition."

    Is there any evidence that poor diet leaves toxins in your body that require interventions other than stop eating bad food.
    Can you define the "cleanse" you advocate in any way?
    Do have any good sources?

  • 3
  • 6

    Quote from Akasha2#
    So a nurse decides to steal a discharge and decease patient Narcotics out that lock box. When should the DON have removed them? Is there a time frame for this to prevent these things from happening?
    I will be the first to reply:

    What?

  • 8

    Quote from OneRN2
    I just happen to come across this post; let me say that I do "agree" with the overwhelming opinion of hysteria regarding sugar "toxins".
    Although, I also wish to state that "I" found the article the writer referred to "interesting" for the following reasons.

    1-It was found in "JAMA" or the Journal of the American Medical Association. This is a "peer-reviewed" medical journal, it publishes original research, reviews, and editorials.

    JAMA Internal Medicine*is an international peer-reviewed journal, seeks to provides information that may lead to positive change in our health and patient care delivery. Thus this process ideally subjects an author’s "scholarly work, research or ideas" to the scrutiny of other experts in the same field. The article the writer referred to can be (copy & paste) found at... JAMA.*2012;307(12):1273-1283. doi:10.1001/jama.2012.339 ( Journal of the American College of Cardiology Volume 57, issue 16, April 19, 2011- Pages 1690-1696)

    2-*In addition, one of the American Heart Association recommendations for the general population is aim to improve "blood glucose" or sugar intake while eating a healthy or my words a "healthier diet" .

    The AHA "7" cardiovascular health recommendations or "metrics": not smoking; being physically active; having normal blood pressure, blood glucose and total cholesterol levels, and weight; and eating a healthy diet) you may read yourself just access the link or copy and paste... Elsevier: Article Locator and read this article.

    Articles may also be found at Google scholar with the full doi.org links above

    I "do not fear any sugar toxins", or "radical diets". I do believe each one of us here can contribute to our Nursing Scientific knowledgebase; and maybe mini-self research or self assessment or topics that interest us or our patients.

    I also admit that I enjoy the opportunity to annually make and keep a few of my New Years resolutions...to be a bit more cognizant of my Life and health choices, habits, and take note of what best benefits me in this gift called Life.

    Thanks all!
    These are great references showing some of the damage we do buy eating commercial high sugar foods. And, the link between diet and inflammation becomes more important as we learn more about the relationship of inflammation and disease.

    I don't think there is any question about how harmful our food choices are.

    But, when I looked for some reliable information about some of the premises of the OP, like retained toxins needing to be flushed, it was hard finding credible experts without a financial interest.

    I found that Dr Oz supports this approach.

    I did find some credible experts who also doubt the cleansing idea.

    Let’s be clear,” says Edzard Ernst, emeritus professor of complementary medicine at Exeter University, “there are two types of detox: one is respectable and the other isn’t.” The respectable one, he says, is the medical treatment of people with life-threatening drug addictions. “The other is the word being hijacked by entrepreneurs, quacks and charlatans to sell a bogus treatment that allegedly detoxifies your body of toxins you’re supposed to have accumulated.”

    " “Detox” is a case of a legitimate medical term being turned into a marketing strategy – all designed to treat a nonexistent condition."

  • 17

    Quote from traumaRUs
    Ok. I have removed some off topic posts. Fine to disagree but if you haven’t even read the article commenting is rather worthless except to increase your post count
    I read the article. And, I really don't care about my post count.

    I have also read books by Michael Pollen and Michael Moss. The subject interests me.

    Salt Sugar Fat by Moss does a great job explaining many of the points made about the food industry, and how we ended up where we are now, and Pollans books are well researched and well written,

    The points the author makes about the food industry and the addictive nature of sugar are well founded.

    I think it is great to educate people about the connections between sugar and ilness. And, to provide some of the commercial incentives that have made modern food what it is.

    It is the claims she made regarding the "cleanse" I object to If there is validity to them, she really should show it. Lasting toxins and damage to the gut that will be repaired by pharmaceutical grade micro-nutrients? This sounds like pseudoscience.

    If this is not a gimmick, but has some scientific background, she should include it.

  • 0
  • 1
    JKL33 likes this.

    Quote from NuGuyNurse2b
    Agree, I think you could've handled it way better. It was passive aggressive, and at worst, downright rude. You asked for assistance, she stated her reasons for not helping, you should've accepted it. And we've all been there where charting actually does take priority - so that 30 seconds may have been taking away her time from charting a new IV or a vital sign that she's going to forget if she doesn't do it right then and there. There will be times when your service will be requested too, and whatever it is that you're doing, you simply cannot help. And we've all felt the burning eyes of patient's family members on us while we're charting but they think we're playing Solitaire on the computer. It shouldn't be the same when it comes to fellow staff members.

    And yes, there are fellow nurses who aren't team players, they're present on every unit, every shift...I make note to not request their assistance, and when they request mine, I turn them down.
    No.

    Your charting is not more important than my emergency.
    Not good prioritization.

    I can't even imagine turning down a peer who asked for help in what he/she considered an emergency so I can chart. Oh, and by the way- please don't have the tech help you stabilize this potentially dangerous patient, as there is a stat inventory list to be made.

    No.

    The potential fallout of forgetting to chart an IV compared to the potential fallout of delaying an indicated restraint- no comparison, and it is a bit surprising that any ER nurse would admit to believing these could be comparable.

    No.

  • 0

    They don't care.
    You could lease as many places as you want.
    What they care about is how much they compensate you. Some of that compensation might be in the form of housing if that is what you negotiate.

  • 2
    rileowski and Wuzzie like this.

    I will go with, no, not much.
    But, depending on the course, it may well help you in the real world.
    Surprisingly, school will teach you next to nothing about first aid, and most nurses don't know what to do in the event of a car accident.

  • 4
    dishes, audreysmagic, ruby_jane, and 1 other like this.

    Falsification would refer to things that are false- hence the term.
    If this was truly a concern, then nothing could ever be corrected. Respirations would have to remain at 112 and a heart rate of 16.
    As far as actually typing the words "late entry" into the note- I would say that is a hold over from paper charting. It is clearly a late entry.

  • 0

    Quote from ambrosepr
    Medication question: has anyone ever been told that identifying meds is not within nursing scope of practice?
    Well, I am pretty sure that identifying your medication is kind of important.
    On the other hand, if you have the right patient, time, dose, and route, that is 80%.

    I am guessing I don't understand the question.

  • 30

    • Some of my co-workers are slow, some are lazy.
    • I regularly deal with drug seekers.
    • Some patients and family members are abusive jerks.
    • Sometimes I encounter docs who are inexperienced, slow, obstinate or jerks.
    • Many of my patients brought their problems on themselves through poor choices.
    • Admin has no idea what I actually do, or what they could do to improve patient care.
    • Valuing customer satisfaction over patient outcomes is shortsighted, stupid and harmful.

    I am sure I could go on, but I would be hard pressed to come up with a complaint that has not been adequately expressed here. Probably on the first page of this forum.

    But, being a grownup, I know that few things in life are perfect.

    • Most of my co-workers are decent people, many have a strong understanding of teamwork, and are very competent. I like them.
    • I am often thanked and appreciated by patients and their families. When they see me in the hall, or passing through the hospital (or sometimes in Walmart) they often tell me how their family member is doing. Apparently they got the idea that I care.
    • I get along well with other departments. I am nice to them. I look for ways I can help, and tasks I can deposit into the favor bank. When I need something from them, they are usually pretty helpful.
    • For the most part, the docs I work with are collegial. We get along well, and when I advocate for a patient, I usually get what I want.
    • I live in the states where wages are, for the most part, determined by the laws of supply and demand. If there were people willing to do my job for $15 an hour, that would be the pay. I nobody would show up for under $60 an hour, that would be the pay. But, I chose the field, and can choose to leave. I have heard driving for UPS pays more. I bet those guys hire new drivers every day, but I like nursing.
    • I don't feel entitled to new cars or high end electronics- I live within my means and have what I think of as a high standard of living. Going overseas over Christmas, ski trip in February, and might take the summer off. Could take off on the sailboat for a month or two if I want.
    • I often have fun at work. Sometimes it is rewarding, and I feel really good that my extra time training, studying and reading has helped me do a good job under challenging circumstances. Sometimes I leave feeling like I have been tossed around in a cement mixer for 14 hours. Then pooped on. But, when I clock out, work stays right where it belongs- in the hospital. (Maybe some of the poop makes it home sometimes.)


    Nursing isn't who I am. It's what I do 36 hours a week to pay the bills, and allows me to do the stuff I want for the remaining 132 hours a week.


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