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Joined Apr 7, '07. Posts: 1,005 (55% Liked) Likes: 2,128

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  • Oct 3 '16

    I am about seven months off orientation now, and it seems I'm still making mistakes, even worse ones. Every day I walk in, there seems to be something that just gets thrown at me and there just aren't the friendly preceptors around now -- just the nasty old seasoned nurses who aren't too nice about my mistakes. I get tired of it, but try to go on and chalk it up to learning and "doing the time." Even though the experiences are trying, I'm learning from them and hope to fall back on it at some point.

    I was horrible in a code situation last night, and I just feel like the biggest dope this a.m. I was surrounded by all the experienced hot shots who basically reduced me to an errand girl in a code for MY patient -- ****** me off. They just all seem to come in and take over and it can make you feel like THEY dont' trust YOU to know what you're doing. The problem is -- that vibe actually reduces my confidence and I start screwing up -- I hate it when that happens.

    I just wish over and over the "seasoned" nurses would cut new nurses some fricking SLACK. How can we automatically perform brilliantly in every situation when we haven't even lived through them yet? There is often "teaching" on skills in theory, but no real life experience taught until you're knee deep in crap --

    I dont' know the answer -- it's just incredibly painful to be climbing up that learning curve!

  • Sep 23 '16

    I try at least to arm myself with enough knowledge about their case, their problems, what the treatments plans are, etc, so that I can discuss with them the plans. If I go in "blind," I ask them for time to review their case, explain to them that I just came on, dont' know their case, etc. MOST people will understand and give me time to get caught up. Then I can investigate, find out what's wrong, try to help, etc. With most reasonable people, it works.

    I also don't get too friendly lately, EVER. I am professional, friendly, but not a "friend" to families. I am their nurse, try to be their advocate, but I'm not their friend. I have been burned from being too friendly with those who simply turned on me in a flash when things started not to go well.

    With some who get unreasonable, I will try to politely reason, try to politely provide explanations, and often I can turn them around and get them to calm down. I will try to listen to them as much as possible, see their point of view, etc.

    The ones that TOTALLY get me are the ones who complain about the food. I mean -- it's SO childish to me to complain about a hot meal -- who CARES if it's not restaurant quality -- most of it is edible, at least -- and if they are well enough to complain about it, IMO, they aren't even sick enough to be in the hospital in the first place. Just my opinon -- just grinds my gears to no end.

  • Jul 31 '16

    Well, your'e not alone. I had to go on zoloft right at the start of nursing school, and unbelievably, I was able to wean off of it before becoming a nurse -- but I definitely have high moments of anxiety and wish i was back on it. I also was taking Lunesta for a long time while doing nights because I'd come home so spun up and stressed. Now I'm more into natural herbals to get to sleep.

    I agree w/ everyone not to divulge this to anyone at work. It's none of their business. It's your health issue.

    AD's take at least 6 weeks to really start kicking in. Until then, take it easy on yourself, get plenty of rest, use lots of good positive self talk -- go to movies, whatever. get your mind off of it. Take part in some pleasurable activities to get those endorphins going -- exercise, whatever. Eat well, Take good care of YOU.

    Your'e doing a lot -- working in a tough profession w/ a small child. It's very tough. But your'e going in the right direction by getting help and seeing a counselor. Those are all the right things!!!! So, you're doing the right thing w/ your health, and you're probably also doing all of the right things at work. Try not to be your own worst enemy. I know how it is because I am always my own also.

    Remember, you're a new nurse. NO ONE expects you to be proficient at this point. Some preceptor or manager or another nurse on the staff might occasionally harrass you and haggle w/ you over things, but in their own way, they're just trying to teach you and make you a safe nurse. Don't take any criticisms or corrections personally. Just say, "Oh, ok, thanks for that. I'm glad you took the time to teach me -- thanks again."

    As long as you are working hard and putting forth a good faith effort -- that is enough. I see you started in an ICU which can be traumatizing. I did that also and for me, also, it was the wrong move. Just put way too much fear into me. I went to a floor and did much better and now am ready to go back to an ICU after 2 years.

    You're doing great, girl -- you are courageous!!! You are a great mom! You're gonna be a fantastic nurse!!!!! Never happens overnight ...

  • Jul 22 '16

    I try at least to arm myself with enough knowledge about their case, their problems, what the treatments plans are, etc, so that I can discuss with them the plans. If I go in "blind," I ask them for time to review their case, explain to them that I just came on, dont' know their case, etc. MOST people will understand and give me time to get caught up. Then I can investigate, find out what's wrong, try to help, etc. With most reasonable people, it works.

    I also don't get too friendly lately, EVER. I am professional, friendly, but not a "friend" to families. I am their nurse, try to be their advocate, but I'm not their friend. I have been burned from being too friendly with those who simply turned on me in a flash when things started not to go well.

    With some who get unreasonable, I will try to politely reason, try to politely provide explanations, and often I can turn them around and get them to calm down. I will try to listen to them as much as possible, see their point of view, etc.

    The ones that TOTALLY get me are the ones who complain about the food. I mean -- it's SO childish to me to complain about a hot meal -- who CARES if it's not restaurant quality -- most of it is edible, at least -- and if they are well enough to complain about it, IMO, they aren't even sick enough to be in the hospital in the first place. Just my opinon -- just grinds my gears to no end.

  • May 25 '16

    Just hate the stress. The very hectic moments trying to get so much done in so little time. Really hate the nasty co-workers and most of all, nurses who eat their young. I hope for some of them, that karma will be a real b***tch. Because as time goes on and i actually meet more nice nurses that ARE out there -- the meanies seem all the more ridiculous.

    But I love the appreciative patients, the cute litte demented old ladies and all the touching moments w/ patients. Love getting better at my job as time goes on. Love being off 4-5 days now a week and being available for my family, while bringing home good money to make life easier. I also love wearing scrubs.

  • May 24 '16

    Whew, I could have written the OP's post myself. As a turn the corner here on my first year in nursing, I find myself more burnt out now than I was even in my orientation time. I also have a family and bills, my oldest to get through college, and I just can't quit. It's a horrible way to feel when you feel trapped.

    And at least you do feel accepted -- at this point, I feel marginally accepted on my unit -- not exactly part of the "in" crowd. I'm a 2nd degree student also and it's tough to fit in with the younger nurses, and also tough to fit in with the older more experienced ones. Lately I find myself just keeping to myself more and more, and not even trying to get into the talk or conversations.

    Night shift is also starting to kick me. I take Lunesta to sleep, but walk around in a fog on my days off. I have to FORCE myself to get exercise, and to stay up during the day -- it is no way to live.

    I find myself dreaming now of switching units, or even trying a new hospital, just for a change of scenery. It just gets unbearable returning to my position on his unit now. Last night I left a lot of work undone, which isn't normal for me -- I was just so burnt out, so sick of the slavery I'd been succumbed to that day, so tired of the managers poking at me all day, so wanting to just get home on time for a change, that I just left it. I hated that I did that -- but it's just IMPOSSIBLE to get it all done unless you just move your **** every second of the day. Meanwhile, it just seems certain people on our unit get the easier assignments and sit around a lot more -- and THAT is TOALLY demoralizing, especially when they offer no help to you when you are drowning.

    Frankly, I'm just sick of this type of work -- just constant tasks, for 12-14 hrs straight -- NOWHERE do people work this hard without food, drinks, and some breaks. NOWWHERE -- it is just absolutely frying to your brain and your soul.

    Sorry to be so negative. In so many ways, I AM getting it. I AM functioning well as a nurse. I leave on time MOSt of the time, am learning tons, and am learning how to talk to docs. Lots of good going on, but also burnout is just creeping in.

  • Apr 27 '16

    I don't know -- maybe I tend to glamorize the NP job a bit, but I'd rather make $80 or 90K and NOT have to run on my feet 12 hours straight, wade in poop and all the other various bodily fluids, put up with less than endearing nurses and techs, patients falling, screaming, confused and demanding that i bring them their JELLO and adjust their tissue box all day from one end of the table to the other ON SATURDAYs, holidays and the various other days that always seem to fall on the days when I need off.

    I'm going for lifestyle as much as i am for salary.

    Just saw an NP in primary care for my own care the other day ...her job looked pretty nice and she wasn't sweating or stressing out a whole lot as far as I could see. She looked nice, her hair was done, her makeup wasn't sliding off.

    Not that I don't believe the job isn't stressful ...

    For a second income, as far as my own personal life goes, it's definitely GREAT pay.

    I would also relish the thought of dealing with patient for a short time and going onto the next ...not spending an entire 12 hour day w/ the same person.

    Also all the teaching possibilities and other areas one can move into w/ the graduate degree. It's not always all about money.

  • Feb 26 '16

    I am about seven months off orientation now, and it seems I'm still making mistakes, even worse ones. Every day I walk in, there seems to be something that just gets thrown at me and there just aren't the friendly preceptors around now -- just the nasty old seasoned nurses who aren't too nice about my mistakes. I get tired of it, but try to go on and chalk it up to learning and "doing the time." Even though the experiences are trying, I'm learning from them and hope to fall back on it at some point.

    I was horrible in a code situation last night, and I just feel like the biggest dope this a.m. I was surrounded by all the experienced hot shots who basically reduced me to an errand girl in a code for MY patient -- ****** me off. They just all seem to come in and take over and it can make you feel like THEY dont' trust YOU to know what you're doing. The problem is -- that vibe actually reduces my confidence and I start screwing up -- I hate it when that happens.

    I just wish over and over the "seasoned" nurses would cut new nurses some fricking SLACK. How can we automatically perform brilliantly in every situation when we haven't even lived through them yet? There is often "teaching" on skills in theory, but no real life experience taught until you're knee deep in crap --

    I dont' know the answer -- it's just incredibly painful to be climbing up that learning curve!



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