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kakamegamama 13,140 Views

Joined Feb 20, '07. Posts: 937 (62% Liked) Likes: 2,121

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  • Jan 21

    Quote from /username
    With the name change, nobody cares enough to follow who you are. If you were truly sorry, there would be no need for this post, and you would apologize directly to those you offended in a private forum, but since you can't even mention them by name in your OP, I doubt that you have the self awareness to do that...
    To be fair, the poster probably doesn't have enough posts to use the PM function.

    She DID change her username, after it was pointed out to her that it's against TOS.

    Let's give her a chance. To err is human; to forgive, divine.

    I do agree that she owes SBE and Celtic an apology

  • Jan 20

    If you need to be at home more often, the last thing you need is picking up prn hours on top of a full time job.

  • Jan 19

    I have been told to stay home, I have been told to come to work, I have been told to bring a doctor's note when I returned, just about the entire spectrum of responses, but I remember fondly, the time when I was deathly sick at work. When not in the bathroom with either diarrhea or vomiting, I was told to lie down on the couch in the foyer. I don't see how I could have been much help at work but the supervisor probably envisioned taking my 80 patients on herself, so she had me lie down between my med passes. AFAIC, we should stay home when we know that we are capable of being a detriment to our patients, our coworkers, or ourselves. Most of the time we are capable of making that determination.

  • Jan 18

    Although I have less education than physicians on paper, I take the time to listen to patients. I am intellectually curious about my specialty, and love to learn. I nearly always come to work, unless I am in bed, and I feel morally obligated to work during the hours my employer is paying me. I answer pages and the phone. My paperwork is done.

    English is my native language and although I listen to patients, I don't believe everything they say, especially when there is a significant motive to lie or misrepresent. I don't hand out antipsychotics to everyone who claims to hear voices.

    I strive to balance compassion with the realities of the environment. I consider risk/benefit ratio extensively before prescribing.

    In working with a largely African American population- yes, sadly, this is the prison population in my state- I make a special effort to understand how cultural factors impact diagnosis, treatment and care.

    As a result of the above, there was no comparison between me, as a Psychiatric NP, and the mostly foreign Psychiatrists I worked with for many years in the corrections setting, and continue to work with in the community.

    Countless times, patients, staff, and even primary care physicians have approached me to say "you are so much better than Dr So and so!"

    My response is "thank you, but that isn't much of a compliment."

    The moral of the story is that more education on paper sometimes is meaningful. Sometimes it is not.

  • Jan 18
  • Jan 18

    My coworkers will often inform me, "I have to go to the bathroom" and I reply, "Well, not here".

    So my answer is yes, a boss can dictate where you poop because a peer can dictate where you can't poop.

  • Jan 17

    I don't agree with running an antibiotic through a primary line- I believe it should always be run as a piggyback so a flush can be run. Let's say the antibiotic is 50ml and 10ml is left in the tubing- the patient is not getting 20% of the needed medication. One hospital I worked at said there needed to be at least a 13ml flush to ensure the patient received the entire dose of the iv medication.

  • Jan 16

    Quote from EGspirit
    I'm not sure what that has to do with my point that today we tend to think of all the "advanced" positions as being away from the direct care of patients.
    The vast majority of APRNs are involved with direct patient care.

  • Jan 16

    Quote from EGspirit
    Call me naive, but maybe someone could explain something to me:

    But then the BSN becomes an NP, and now they're practicing low-skilled medicine, which isn't nursing at all! But they are the "Advanced Practitioners?"
    Low-skilled medicine? Please, enlighten us, what is the different legal standard that NPs have for the practice compared to physicians? What are the different quality of care measures? What is it exactly about NP practice that is "low-skilled"?

    Quote from EGspirit
    Seriously, wouldn't technical nursing certifications like ACLS and CCRN (or the other specialty certifications) really be what makes a nurse "Advanced."
    What makes an APRN "advanced" is the advanced scope of practice (based on advanced education, advanced knowledge base, etc). Specialty RN certifications demonstrate expertise at the RN level but they do not change the scope of practice.

    Quote from EGspirit
    I mean if my name looks like this:

    EGspirit, MS, APRN, ACNS-BC, CEN, FAWM, FAAN

    am I even a nurse anymore?
    Do the semantics really matter?

    On that topic, there is a semantic issue with the term "bedside" as well. What is your definition of "bedside"?

    Quote from EGspirit
    Why can't caring be the profession and leave medicine and surgery to the doctors, and the Ph.Ds to the Nursing school professors? Wouldn't being really good at running a code or starting an IV, or even being really effective at feeding and bathing a patient be the definition of the advanced nurse?
    Again, the role and the scope (and everything that goes with it) is much different between RN and APRN.

  • Jan 16

    I used to have high ideals, not an par with an angel, just helping others, but the working conditions have gotten so bad over the years I now only look forward to retirement. I work my 3 shifts, do the best I can and I don't do extra. They call almost daily so if it were just about money I could makes lots of OT. The extra money isn't worth the stress and I refuse to be guilted into working extra when management refuses to hire enough nurses. That's on them!

    I do believe you are wrong that bedside nursing is all that counts. In fact the future is away from the hospital setting as more care is outpatient. The irony is my hospital has half as many beds as it used to and yet one thing never changes there is a perpetual nursing shortage given managements refusal to hire enough nurses and the majority of nurses which leave once they see the working conditions.

    It seems that you are romanticizing bedside nursing and will end up being a martyr rather the "angel" you aspire to be. Personally I don't like when management starts the nurse as angel routine, nominate your angel. It is a marketing gimmick to them and creates unrealistic, even impossible expectations. I don't think nurses should be put on a pedestal as we are only human. Management is quick to forget that we have needs such as safe staffing, adequate resources and time to eat and take a break, simply time to think!
    Best of luck of to you!

  • Jan 16

    Quote from BCgradnurse
    What do you think we do all day???
    I basically sit in my ivory tower and judge people.

  • Jan 16

    Quote from EGspirit
    I don't care how the world spins. I don't care if I'm wrong or right. It's just an opinion. Just breath on the wind.
    That's interesting ... someone who admits they don't care if they are right or wrong. They just like hearing themselves talk.

  • Jan 16

    No one, no thing, and certainly no one else's journey takes away from who I am as a nurse.


    Just be the best you and shape the perception of your practice by your practice.

  • Jan 16

    It just sounds like the OP is mistakenly threatened by others who have chosen to get more education!

  • Jan 16

    Quote from EGspirit
    Why in our profession are we always running away from the bedside? I mean, why be in the profession?

    Just wondering and looking for opinions on the matter.
    Because your body is shot after a few years of lifting patients, walking miles down long hallways, etc., etc.


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