Content That brandy1017 Likes

Content That brandy1017 Likes

brandy1017 23,533 Views

Joined Jun 30, '02. Posts: 1,938 (66% Liked) Likes: 4,124

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  • Jul 21

    I don't have any words of wisdom, just want to extend my sympathy, it would so hard to shake such an experience.

    Even though he couldn't be saved, you did ease some of the shock and trauma for the family by taking over and not leaving them completely helpless for the longest 15 minutes of their lives.

  • Jul 21

    He was dead when you started. You did not fail him, CPR wasn't enough to restart his heart. While you are curious; the why is irrelevant. The family may not consent to an autopsy depending on his history.

    You saw a problem and you tried to help. You FIRST asked if 911 was called which was the most important step as clearly he needed more than CPR.

    Since this was not a professional relationship but Good Samaritan watch for the obituary to be posted. If the services are public, feel free to seek closure by offering your condolences to the family. Don't say I'm sorry my CPR didn't work it's likely the aunt & grandmother will identify & introduce you. Without knowing the history, it's likely the parents will be thankful you tried to help.

    If the services are private, then you can send your condolences via the funeral home. Tell the funeral director that if the parents wish to contact you they may this way it's on the parents terms not your need for closure. I've seen traumatic pediatric deaths go both ways. Open/public services and closed/private services. It's impossible to predict.

  • Jul 21

    Quote from Maustin89
    This employer does not have those types of conditions. The only conditions that I am aware of or have been Informed of is that you can not refuse 3+ days in a 30 day period.
    I know they aren't going to give me hours over a full or part time employee.
    But the problems comes in when I have had issues with them in the past that they kept saying they called when they didn't or left a voicemail when they didn't. So I gave them 2 more numbers, including my dads which lives right next door and they've never attempted to call those numbers either. I also had an incident last month when I received a self term notice in the mail for refusing 3 days. I didn't. I had to contact h.r. And let them investigate. They had to give me my position back. 1 of those days I told them to let me know for sure if they needed me but never heard back, cause they weren't sure at the time if they did. The second my supervisor told me not to come in. Since then I've been offered no hours. Not called even once.
    I know they need someone bc one of the full times went to the supervisors position since our supervisor retired and the other prn quit. That only leaces them with 1 full time and me. Plus they have 2. LPNs that can do most of the job requirements but they have schedules of their own. And they hired a new RN. I don't understand how they are hiring a new RN when they tell me there is no hours for me and I have to be offered hours before the LPNs bc of job requirements but they are giving hours to the Lpn.
    maybe it's just because I'm not as close to the situation as you are but the writing on the wall looks to me like they just are not going to have you in unless someone is holding a gun to their heads! they seem to be going to some lengths to not have you working there, so why push it? go PRN somewhere else, because this place doesn't want you, even if they aren't telling you that it looks clear to me.

  • Jul 20

    Well, thanks for all the comments. Word of the day "Naive". You would really have to know me. I was brought up believing that everyone is good etc.... Boy have i learned the difference. I really thought my boss @ the time was forgiving. Guilt, guilt and guilt. I swore i would never do that and i did. Went through a trauma. My children's father committed suicide i was scared to be on my own without support system. Someone offered said " will relieve all your stress" I smoked got the munchies hated it. But i do believe now that it has a great medicinal effect for pt's with CA etc.... Actually i spoke with a woman at OBN who thought it was odd that my employer would keep me knowing this. But she did and it was noted on my consent agreement. Actually, I have good news someone approached me today via email and offered me an interview even with that prior discipline. She was very kind and understanding. Told me " You made a mistake paid the price and i really need a nurse with your experience". "You pass our drug test there will not be an issue". so i am elated!!!!!

  • Jul 19

    I don't know details on how exactly those unarmed guards subdued the shooter, but holy smokes what stones on those folks! Those guards wouldn't be paying for their own lunches for the rest of the year(at a minimum) if I worked on that unit.

  • Jul 18

    RN and OT both have to deal with stifling paperwork and mediocre pay, but on top of that RNs also have to deal with working nights, more bodily fluids and ADL grunt-work, and multiple patients at a time (usually a ridiculous number of patients because corporations are greedy and don't want to staff properly). RNs are also the punching bag that every other department dumps on just because they can, whereas PT and OT get treated with a bit more respect as professionals.

  • Jul 18

    Quote from Horseshoe
    I am married to someone who has a very big income, and he is very generous. I could buy anything I want, and he would be fine with it. But I still work (granted, PRN) and plan to die with an active license. Why? Because I like to contribute to the world in some small measure, make a little of my own money, and model a decent work ethic for my Ds.


    No, I really don't do that. We have a beautiful home, and when we travel, we do travel well. We drive luxury cars (my DH bought me, but I really am not all that into it) and have all of the necessities. But I don't buy "stuff." My wardrobe is a disgrace, I wouldn't know a designer purse if I saw it (other than the "brown one" everyone seems to want), my shoe collection is rather sparce, and I don't like my DH to buy me jewelry because I always seem to lose it. Things can really junk up your life, and maintaining them/caring for them can really eat away at your time and peace of mind.

    We have a second home that we are trying to sell. Not so much because of the monetary expense, but because it has really become a major drain on DH's time and energy.

    No, I don't think about the next thing or gadget on the market. It's just STUFF, and I'm too lazy to have to deal with garage sales, etc. when it's time to chunk it. Worse than that is when you let things pile up on you. I don't want to be the next featured guest on the Hoarder show.
    It's always the people with the luxuries that say they don't need them. Man, what I wouldn't have done in my life to have a 2nd home! I've been student broke and I've done well. I'll take the latter. Life is too stressful for the broke, I remember the times (too) well.

  • Jul 18

    I agree with many of the above posts that "luxury" means different things to different people.

    I'm 2 years in to my nursing career and I still get a little thrill every 2 weeks when it's time for my paycheck to auto-deposit. It is more money than I've made before in my previous career. Also, there was a 4 year time period where I was working part time pieced together low paying jobs leading up to and then during nursing school where I really felt financially scared and vulnerable, so to finally have a feeling of some security, and see my net worth rising over time is such an immense relief.

    I put my first paycheck each month into a generous contribution to retirement, various savings accounts (have about 3 months of emergency fund so far, working toward 6, and saving up for a potential surgery in the next year), and paying monthly expenses (which I do use credit cards for, but don't carry a balance ever), the second is banked for the next month's rent, and then there is usually some extra left over. I drive a 12 year old car that is in good condition and debt free. I'm hoping to buy a house soon. I'm almost done with my BSN, which I did relatively cheaply through an online program -- and did take out more student loans for, but have been paying them off as I go. It's just me and my spoiled cats so I can probably make the nurse's pay go farther, although I would love to have children soon if I find the right partner. I don't work a lot of bonus shifts -- it is good money, but I've been trying to focus on school and getting that done in an efficient manner, and I don't want to hurt myself or burn out. I still live with a housemate, and plan to for the foreseeable future.

    All that said, I have splurged some now that I feel like I have some financial security again. And here's what splurging means to me. I bought a few different pairs of high quality shoes for work -- these cost $80-120 instead of the usual $30-40 I pay for tennies. I bought a few sets of scrubs in colors that brighten my mood when I'm getting ready to go in and have the right fabric to feel comfortable and move well --- even though I already had some that I could wear but just weren't that comfortable. I bought a few new pieces of furniture for my living space that made it feel more adult -- a night stand instead of a milk crate, a soft stuffed couch to replace my crappy college futon, a wooden bathroom cabinet to replace the plastic stack of drawers that used to hold my goodies. I recently bought a couple of fancy drinking fountains for my cats (one $50, one $80) that would have been unthinkable before. Oh, and I've wanted to go on a hot air balloon ride since I was a little girl, and a nursing school classmate and I planned that we would do that together after graduation to celebrate -- we are just now getting around to it next month, at $220 each for a few hours of frivolous but once in a life time fun. I also went to Disneyland for a 2 day trip with a couple of nurse friends in January (about $400) -- I hadn't been since I was 5 years old and we had a blast. It was my first out of town vacation in 5 years.

    I was raised in a home where money was very, very tightly guarded to the point that we were sacrificing nutrition, health and safety. It feels really good to be able to treat myself to better now. But I won't ever overdo it. The financial security feels to good, and I never lose the feeling that it could be taken away at any moment, and I'd better protect myself with a cushion.

  • Jul 18

    I recently bought an electric can opener...

  • Jul 18

    Quote from perfectbluebuildings
    I was amazed by my salary when I became a nurse, because I knew how hard my parents pinched pennies with a family of 8 on a salary similar to mine, and I had only one person to support! But old habits die hard and I still spent like I had very little money. Like others have said, making that much money made me want to save it so I would have even more money in the future.

    But, my weaknesses were buying wayyy too many presents for family at Christmas, just because I "could" now and I enjoyed seeing people really enjoy something I spent a lot of time picking out, but I do admit I went overboard. I also have a weakness for books, sometimes on Kindle, sometimes from a used bookstore. Also bought a decent car and a camera in that first year of being a nurse, and some new clothes instead of thrift store clothes, which on its own felt very extravagant. But that is about it. I really enjoyed seeing that large (to me) number in my bank account, and having the feeling of financial security and independence, and feeling good about myself for having earned it through my own hard work. I was very lucky also to go to a college that gives full tuition scholarships to all of its students, so no student loans for me.

    I did have a very decent amount of savings in the bank, but health problems over the past several years with the associated bills didn't help, and now that I'm unable to work, not having an income, paying COBRA insurance, it's like my money has just evaporated and it hurts. I really miss having that financial security and independence that nursing gave me- that I KNEW I was going to be able to pay my bills every month and get a few nice things here and there. I hope I can go back to work eventually. I am glad though, that I did save a good portion of my money during the years I was working, because although I have had to use a large portion of that savings, I was very glad that I had that money and didn't have to borrow (at least not yet) to cover things.

    I don't know if my rambling answered your question or not. I guess to sum it up, in most parts of the USA (assuming that is where you live), nursing will afford you a job that will help you be financially secure, and that feeling is worth so much more (in my mind) than luxuries. I'm not saying that you have to live like you have no money, but save as much as you can because you never know when life will hit and you'll need every penny of that savings to get through it. Congratulations on getting through nursing school also
    This has open my eyes that a savings account will be dire because you will never know what life throws at you. Thank you for the post.

  • Jul 18

    31 years ago, I did spend more than I had as a nursing student for sure! After working for 3 months I bought a brand new car, new clothes and moved out. Fast forward to a year and a half into my career, I fell and had a severe break of my tib/fib, I was supposed to be moving to NC with my roommate, well guess what, I ended up back at home with my parents (thank goodness for
    them), and still had those bills to pay. I had 6 weeks paid sick time, and about half a year's salary in the bank. After 6 weeks it went unpaid. My long term disability kicked in, but it wasn't my full pay. And in the time between being unpaid and my disability, I had to shell out money to keep my benefits. My ankle took 2 surgeries to repair, months in first a long leg cast then a short leg, non weight bearing for 9 weeks and I had to go back at 6 months due to my job being on the line. I went back 2 days a week....talk about being poor again! I also had to postpone my wedding due to lack of funds.

    Moral of of the story....don't spend spend spend right away, put away money for at least a year. I don't know what I would have done without my parents help. Buy yourself small things that you want, but be careful with credit and large purchases!

  • Jul 18

    I was amazed by my salary when I became a nurse, because I knew how hard my parents pinched pennies with a family of 8 on a salary similar to mine, and I had only one person to support! But old habits die hard and I still spent like I had very little money. Like others have said, making that much money made me want to save it so I would have even more money in the future.

    But, my weaknesses were buying wayyy too many presents for family at Christmas, just because I "could" now and I enjoyed seeing people really enjoy something I spent a lot of time picking out, but I do admit I went overboard. I also have a weakness for books, sometimes on Kindle, sometimes from a used bookstore. Also bought a decent car and a camera in that first year of being a nurse, and some new clothes instead of thrift store clothes, which on its own felt very extravagant. But that is about it. I really enjoyed seeing that large (to me) number in my bank account, and having the feeling of financial security and independence, and feeling good about myself for having earned it through my own hard work. I was very lucky also to go to a college that gives full tuition scholarships to all of its students, so no student loans for me.

    I did have a very decent amount of savings in the bank, but health problems over the past several years with the associated bills didn't help, and now that I'm unable to work, not having an income, paying COBRA insurance, it's like my money has just evaporated and it hurts. I really miss having that financial security and independence that nursing gave me- that I KNEW I was going to be able to pay my bills every month and get a few nice things here and there. I hope I can go back to work eventually. I am glad though, that I did save a good portion of my money during the years I was working, because although I have had to use a large portion of that savings, I was very glad that I had that money and didn't have to borrow (at least not yet) to cover things.

    I don't know if my rambling answered your question or not. I guess to sum it up, in most parts of the USA (assuming that is where you live), nursing will afford you a job that will help you be financially secure, and that feeling is worth so much more (in my mind) than luxuries. I'm not saying that you have to live like you have no money, but save as much as you can because you never know when life will hit and you'll need every penny of that savings to get through it. Congratulations on getting through nursing school also

  • Jul 18

    I bought a brand new car when I graduated from nursing school. After years of driving cars that I paid $25-50 for at the junk yard, I was ready for a car I could depend upon to get me where I was going without drama. I loved that car -- a silver Honda Civic. Come to think of it, I probably SAVED money in missed appointments, cab fare, repairs, tires and replacement $50 cars from the junkyard when one of the ones we were driving (we usually had 3 in rotation) broke beyond my then-husband's ability to repair it.

    Unlike many of you, I don't think new cars are a waste of money. When I buy a brand new car, I do the maintenence, take good care of it and am able to drive it for 150,000 miles or so without a lot of problems. That way I don't inherit someone else's issues that have arisen from not taking car of the car, treating it harshly or neglecting the maintenence. I do my research, buy a reliable brand and buy the basic model without all of the fancy extras. I'm also pretty good at bargaining with car salesmen. I bought my 1989 Subaru 4WD wagon on the last day of February when salesmen were looking to meet their quotas during a blizzard when no one else was out looking for a car. I knew exactly what I wanted and bargained for it until they gave it to me at their cost just to get rid of me so they could close up the dealership and go home. Blizzard. Bad roads. I didn't take that car out of 4WD for the first week I owned it because the roads were so bad, but I got to work every day!

  • Jul 18

    Quote from ThePrincessBride
    I live with my mom and feel that adult kids should be helping out financially if they are living under their parents' roof.
    You are a wonderful adult child!!!

    OMG … can I clone you?

  • Jul 18

    You know what? When I first decided to take nursing prerequists I thought I would be able to afford things like that, but that wasn't the case.

    I thought I'd be able to afford a nice house, luxury car - expensive department store make-up … (please understand I was still in my early 20's at the time). I thought all my money problems would be over if I could just graduate and start working as an RN!

    Not.

    The nurse recruiter for the biggest teaching hospital came out to speak to our class the semester before we graduated. A classmate of mine raised her hand and asked how much we would earn as new grads? Without missing a beat she stated "$35,000/yr" (this was late 1993).

    When I graduated in December 1993 the highest pay for a brand new grad RN in Tucson, AZ was $12.75/hr.

    Yes, you read that correctly.

    That's not even $25,000 anually for full time (three 12 hr shifts/wk).

    That was $10,000 less than we were told.

    I was stunned. And a bit horrified too.

    Plus, because I was nearing 30, my bio-clock was ticking, ticking … I calculated when I could get pregnant and deliver after graduation, so I had a little one on the way too. And because we had no family living near us, and because my husband was a cook earning approximately $8.00/hr (1993!) we decided he would stay home with the baby for 2 years, which would be cheaper than day care, and give me infinite peace of mind.

    Not only could I not afford those luxury items, but I had to work over time almost right away - we still didn't have a great income. Plus, we had more bills - including my student loans.

    Sigh …

    New grad salaries earn quite a bit higher pay now, but unless you are single, without children, and without debt, it is unlikely you will be living it up post graduation.

    I hope this isn't a wet blanket response, but I sure would have liked to have known this before I graduated.

    Hang on to that frugal tendency my friend - it will serve you well.

    Another thing I was clueless about: no matter how young you are - start saving for retirement right away. The more the better. Take advantage of your hospital's 401K, and their matching your contributions.

    Something else I didn't know about: once you graduate the credit card offers will literally start pouring in - use caution here. You don't need to accumulate even more debt, although it will be tempting. So very, very tempting.

    Not trying to tell you what to do or how to live your life, but this is advice I give my 22 y.o. son, because I learned this the hard way. Heed my warning, or suffer the same grief I experienced.

    And also allow me to give you an early welcome to nursing (we sure need you!).


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