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brandy1017 32,534 Views

Joined Jun 30, '02. Posts: 2,104 (67% Liked) Likes: 4,685

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  • Feb 18

    I just think it is ridiculous to put people in boxes based on the year they were born.

    I was born in the 60's, I somehow mastered the basics of using the Internet.

  • Feb 18

    Quote from Sarah2018
    Hi guys
    Hi Sweetie!
    Quote from Sarah2018
    There are are male team leaders(only male) at work who do nothing except sitting and talking and joking with staff( but without helping them) as if they are at a cafe.
    Well SOMEBODY has to do it. It's a "differentiation of duties". We're there for entertainment and morale purposes.
    Quote from Sarah2018
    Yesterday and today were heavy for me, and the team leader despite being free and roaming around as if he is on a picnic, did not help. If my patients are calling and I am busy, he just tells me that one patient called and I should see what he wanted.
    Yep. That's called "delegation of duties"! So, what's your point?
    Quote from Sarah2018
    Men are strong and they have bigger lung capacity and they are more powerful than us women yet they refuse to use that physical power.
    You've haven't met my wife, Belinda the Amazon Woman RN.
    Quote from Sarah2018
    They don't answer the calling bells from patients or take heavy patients to toilet.
    Uh huh. Yeah.
    Quote from Sarah2018
    What is the best way to handle the issue?
    Heck, we don't take patients to the toilet. We don't handle tissues or issues!
    Quote from Sarah2018
    Should I email the charge nurse regarding the issue or tell them to move(they are senior in position to me btw)?
    Yeah, the email is best. That way only a delete button needs to be pushed and no piece of paper needs to be shredded.

    If there's anything else I can do for you, well... just do it for yourself.

  • Feb 17

    Quote from Have Nurse
    If she has confessed it, she owns it. And the law says if you have knowledge and fail to report it, as the safety of the public hangs in the balance, then you are culpable.
    Citation please? As long as she does not come to work under the influence what she does legally on her own time is none of anybody's business. I have no legal responsibility to notify anyone that one of my coworkers had too much to drink on the weekend. I can legally get ripped every single weekend which would definitely indicate a problem but as long as I am sober at work there is nothing to report.


    ETA: I do not, in fact, get ripped every weekend in case anybody is wondering.

  • Feb 17

    Your exit interview should be about you. If this place had a 100% staff turnover in a few months they are an out-of-control dumpster fire and if they don't know it by now they won't be educated by some relatively short-term employee who is leaving anyway. Say something like "thank you for the opportunity. I enjoyed my time here but a better opportunity arose.... or some other happy-faced dreck that will put you in the best possible light. Nothing is to be gained by telling them your version of the truth & you may well get labeled as a complainer in the very small and connected world of nursing.

    As far as reporting some nurse to the board for comments about outside of work activities please don't do it. If she is not impaired at work & you didn't witness her being impaired then how much wine she drinks when she is not there is pure conjecture and none of your business. If you report her and the BON gets involved its like blowing up her life. If she's placed in a monitoring program she will lose her job and have her life irrevocably impacted

  • Feb 17

    Quote from Have Nurse
    This nurse is in a powerful position. If she needs help with her addiction, she needs to get it. Your state board of nursing should be contacted for guidance.
    So risk ruining someone's life because of rumor and conjecture? Have you any idea what reporting her to the board will do to her? Read the recovery forum. The mature and professional response would be having a private discussion with her manager about her concerns rather than running off "tattling" to everyone and their brother.

  • Feb 17

    Quote from wondern
    All of this and also 'decline offers for exit interviews', I love it. Tell it, Wuzzie!
    Amen caliotter, 'before you resigned'!
    Yes, to fewer witch hunts, Oldmanhubbard!
    Yes, way out of control! You're smart to leave before you get burned.
    Attachment 26052

    Bless your heart. It's often referred to endearingly as sassyy~y style.Attachment 26053
    Maybe it was a bunch of nasty gossip about a higher up that they didn't know to be true but had a negative effect on the work environment regardless because it was nasty and also involved coworkers, maybe. You know like a real General Hospital soap opera. Who really knows? Life can be so shockingly strange.Attachment 26054
    Somebody is feisty today!

  • Feb 17

    My employer cares so little about what we might say in an exit interview that we no longer have them. You can fill out your reason on line.

  • Feb 17

    Quote from Wuzzie
    Honestly, HR doesn't care what you think. They're checking off a box on a list. Nothing more. Nothing less.....I decline offers for exit interviews for that reason.
    All of this and also 'decline offers for exit interviews', I love it. Tell it, Wuzzie!
    Quote from caliotter3
    ... If the employer cared about what you have to say, they would have listened to you before you resigned.
    Amen caliotter, 'before you resigned'!
    Quote from Oldmahubbard
    Not a good idea to turn someone in to the board after a couple of vague comments, if they haven't been impaired at work.
    We need fewer witch hunts in nursing, not more.
    Yes, to fewer witch hunts, Oldmanhubbard!
    Quote from SpankedInPittsburgh
    ...If this place had a 100% staff turnover in a few months they are an out-of-control dumpster fire and if they don't know it by now they won't be educated by some relatively short-term employee who is leavinganyway.....she will lose her job and have her life irrevocably impacted
    Yes, way out of control! You're smart to leave before you get burned.
    Attachment 26052
    Quote from Neats
    ... You wanted more of a direct leader with boundaries that have a directive and behavioral style. There is no need to burn bridges. This Northern girl learned from Southern women to be kind in a snarky way. I appreciate those verbal skills.
    Bless your heart. It's often referred to endearingly as sassyy~y style.Attachment 26053
    Quote from 3ringnursing
    No matter how tempting it may be to summarily list each one of your legitimate concerns ...... As if whatever was revealed had the potential to define that nurse in regard to a good reference, a good professional reputation, or even possible rehire.
    ...Telling the truth is something we have been taught to do from the earliest age (and sadly, in my opinion something we don't encounter often enough) doing so in this instance has it's own consequences that most people aren't willing to risk....
    Maybe it was a bunch of nasty gossip about a higher up that they didn't know to be true but had a negative effect on the work environment regardless because it was nasty and also involved coworkers, maybe. You know like a real General Hospital soap opera. Who really knows? Life can be so shockingly strange.Attachment 26054

  • Feb 17

    Quote from Daisy4RN
    I have never been to, nor will I ever go to an exit interview. No good will ever come from them.
    They are a huge waste of time. I did one with HR when I left my first nursing job. It was a time of high turnover on my unit. Several people said that they were leaving because of problems with our nurse manager. This was 6 years ago and said manager not only still works on the floor but is now the director of the entire department. HR doesn't care what you say and it will generally be a waste of your breath.

    I am hoping to be resigning from my current job within the next week or 2. I so badly want to say something as I'm leaving about how the company cares about profits over patients and does nothing to retain employees (I am currently the most senior person in my department at just over 2 1/2 years) but I know nothing will change based on my statements. In fact, we have had a great deal of turnover in our department lately and it was used to fire our boss, despite the fact that several people specifically said in their exit interviews that they were leaving the company not the manager. So I'll just speak with my feet and I already left my honest (and anonymous) review of the company on glassdoor.

  • Feb 17

    No matter how tempting it may be to summarily list each one of your legitimate concerns to a captive audience now that you have one foot out the door, I wholeheartedly agree with Nurse Beth and everyone else who advises you that to share this information at your exit interview is not in your best interests.

    Despite the fact that we nurses as a group are large in number, it's a surprisingly small world out there - and it's an even smaller professional network in each of our cities then most people actually realize. Everyone knows a friend of a friend's brother's second cousin (thrice removed) whose mother's neighbor's uncle knows someone who works at any one of the various local hospitals and/or medical centers. If you spill the truth to the wrong people the odds are not in your favor that you yourself won't also be a casualty in some way from the flying shrapnel of the potential fallout. Sharing anything directly negative about another person in this situation has the possibility to come back to haunt us exponentially in a vile number of ways - more often than not we will find ourselves wishing heartily that we had just kept our mouth shut. Especially (or should I say doubly) if the person in question is your boss (or even just someone higher up in the food chain than yourself).

    I also agree that for the most part HR doesn't give a rat's hairy arse what we ordinary plebeian's think, however once in a while there will be someone who really does want the lowdown on this information.

    Once upon a time (in a land far, far away) I had a job where my supervisor had also become a friend. There was one area in particular that the nursing turnover rate was off the charts - by the time this story I'm sharing took place every single nursing position had already changed over at least twice since I had started (perhaps 9-10 months). My supervisor/friend confided to me that no one would say why they were leaving - this frustrated her because until she could figure out what the problem was and try to fix it the endless turnover in nursing staff would continue, remaining a revolving door of nurses quitting and being hired to fill those constantly open positions, wasting both time and money.

    This is a guess, but the best I could figure as to why no one wanted to enlighten her was possibly the general consensus and fear that they could be potentially blackballed when attempting to use that job as a reference in the future. As if whatever was revealed had the potential to define that nurse in regard to a good reference, a good professional reputation, or even possible rehire.

    Although telling the truth is a virtue in it's own right - something we have all been taught to do from the earliest age (and sadly, in my opinion something we don't encounter often enough) doing so in this instance has it's own consequences that most people aren't willing to risk.

    Tread lightly my friend.

  • Feb 17

    I opened my big mouth at an exit interview and have lived to regret it. Every word I said about my narcissist manager was 100% true. However, I loved my coworkers and wanted to go back per diem after she graced another facility with her presence. I had excellent evals and they do not give me a bad reference. I am told by a friend and former coworker, that upper management does not ever want me rehired. Best to keep your thoughts to yourself. Nursing is a small world.

  • Feb 17

    Quote from Have Nurse
    This nurse is in a powerful position. If she needs help with her addiction, she needs to get it. Your state board of nursing should be contacted for guidance.
    Not a good idea to turn someone in to the board after a couple of vague comments, if they haven't been impaired at work.
    We need fewer witch hunts in nursing, not more.

  • Feb 17

    Quote from Wuzzie
    Honestly, HR doesn't care what you think. They're checking off a box on a list. Nothing more. Nothing less. Anything you say will have zero impact and will not effect the change you hope it would. You'll end up being marked as a complainer and it could return to bite you in the butt when you least expect it. I decline offers for exit interviews for that reason.
    I agree with this. It can only work against the person doing the talking on the way out. If the employer cared about what you have to say, they would have listened to you before you resigned.

  • Feb 17

    Honestly, HR doesn't care what you think. They're checking off a box on a list. Nothing more. Nothing less. Anything you say will have zero impact and will not effect the change you hope it would. You'll end up being marked as a complainer and it could return to bite you in the butt when you least expect it. I decline offers for exit interviews for that reason.

  • Feb 17

    I generally respond with something along the lines of "I have accepted an offer that better fits with my professional and personal goals." I then thank them for the opportunities that they have provided me and that's about it. Like stated above, you never know who you're going to run into or when. Best to keep it generic and cordial.


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