Content That brandy1017 Likes

Content That brandy1017 Likes

brandy1017 22,920 Views

Joined Jun 30, '02. Posts: 1,923 (66% Liked) Likes: 4,077

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  • Jun 26

    Here's an idea, spend the money on more staffing instead of useless crap like this!

    Annie

  • Jun 26

    All that 'exercise' shows is a complete disconnect between floor nurses & management.

    And if any of the management that designed this atrocity were once floor nurses, then they should be mortally ashamed of themselves!

    Do they think nurses leave a patients on bedpans longer than necessary because we're shopping on the internet? And everyone of us knows exactly what it feels like not to empty our bladder when we need to, it happens every shift!

    I would think a fair resolution would be:
    1) be paid double time for that ' training session
    2) allow every nurse that participated to come up with a scenario that they've experienced on the floor & force the management to participate in their own 'boot camp' so they can develop a little empathy of their own- make sure there is charting involved- don't spare them that!!
    3) have someone call them during their regular time to sleep to beg/cajole/threaten them to work overtime because of short staffing

    Maybe have their bootcamp last more than one day, because a few 12 hr shifts will give them a better feel of how tiring it is

    Monetary compensation is good- but it's not everything. Management is not going to get it until they walk at least a few feet in nurse's shoes

  • Jun 26

    I would have been like, "Deuces, I am off to the bathroom!" Because I damn near wrecked my bladder and kidneys while deployed, and I am not doing that again. I would have thrown the combat veteran card at them, oh yes indeed, you better believe it. And honestly, you'd have to physically restrain me if you wanted me to participate in such shenanigans, and then there would REALLY be a problem. I might be only 4'11", but I am a scrapper.

    If their administration wanted a demonstration of empathy, they should work a shift with the nurses to find out why it is that their patients can't get enough time with their nurses. I would bet it's a lack of staffing.

  • Jun 26

    Quote from katie93
    Ugh, I did my role transition clinical at that hospital. Doesn't surprise me at all so glad I didn't apply there. Patient satisfaction can't be the only thing driving reimbursement. This scares me as a new nurse!
    I really believe that it is the dehumanization by management that looks at healthcare 100% with a financially driven lens.

  • Jun 25

    This article infuriated me. I was just about to post this, if no one else had. Humiliation is the least of it. It's the corporate culture of "keeping the nursie-poo's in their place."

    To me, this is much worse than the bucket & mop scandal from a couple years ago. So much worse. It takes psychological warfare up several notches to downright abusive.

    Even ZDoggMD posted a video about it yesterday on his Facebook page.

    Reprehensible.

  • Jun 25

    Best way to improve medical outcomes and patient satisfaction? Hire more nurses. Period.


    A Health Affairs study comparing patient-satisfaction scores with HCAHPS surveys of almost 100,000 nurses showed that a better nurse work environment was associated with higher scores on every patient-satisfaction survey question. And University of Pennsylvania professor Linda Aiken found that higher staffing of registered nurses has been linked to fewer patient deaths and improved quality of health. Failure-to-rescue rates drop. Patients are less likely to die or to get readmitted to the hospital. Their hospital stay is shorter and their likelihood of being the victim of a fatigue-related error is lower. When hospitals improve nurse working conditions, rather than tricking patients into believing they’re getting better care, the quality of care really does get better.



    Excerpted from: The Problem With Satisfied Patients

  • Jun 25

    Quote from Emergent
    They need a boot camp for management. No breaks, unreasonable patients and family members, ridiculous mandatory charting, 5 call lights going off at once, monitor alarms and bed alarms screeching as well.

    I like your idea ...

    Some of the issues that are related to errors in healthcare is "dehumanization of healthcare providers." That includes how leaders manage healthcare workers including nurses - they are mostly seen in relation to finances, which leads to uncaring treatment by management. Healthcare workers see themselves as a "pawn" (Porter-O'Grady & Malloch, 2015, p.373)


    Reference:
    Porter-O’Grady, T., & Malloch, K. (2015). Quantum leadership: Building better partnerships for sustainable health (4th ed.). Sudbury, MA: Jones & Bartlett Publishers. ISBN: 978-1-284-05068-4

  • Jun 25

    This is disgusting and makes me see red! Ya know, it MUST be nursing's fault and never that there isn't enough staff and resources (sarcasm font needed)

    I hate this mentality that it's everyone's fault except administrators who don't want to pay for adequate staffing.

  • Jun 25

    They need a boot camp for management. No breaks, unreasonable patients and family members, ridiculous mandatory charting, 5 call lights going off at once, monitor alarms and bed alarms screeching as well.

  • Jun 24

    Sounds like the common unhappy Nurse. Get ready there everywhere. Advice there's got to be someone else you can go to for help and questions.

  • Jun 24

    You have no business being in management with that attitude!!! If you can't handle bedside nursing, you'll never survive as a functional manager. The managers have to be the best bedside nurses to effectively manage others. Shame on you!

    I'm a bedside nurse turned manager who voluntarily still works at the bedside to stay in touch with the needs of the patient, their families and my staff. Yeah, some days suck, but it makes me a better nurse and a better manager.

  • Jun 24

    Yes, bedside is not for everyone. I do enjoy it most of the time and yes there are moments when you get that sinking feeling - "what the heck happened to my life" but there are also toxic places and nice places to work. I've been in both. I agree with you in that some places are impossible to work...and every aspect of these places is toxic. The only way out is the door of course.

  • Jun 24

    Thank you for having the courage to write this. Many floor nurses such as myself, feel this way but are too afraid to say anything. This is because of critics like some of the people replying to this that feel that it is terrible to think this way. To be tired of the rude, self centered public that we have to deal with daily does not make us bad people or bad nurses. Patient satisfaction scores being the only priority to our employers doesn't help matters either. We are just tired of giving so much and being treated so terribly.

  • Jun 23
  • Jun 23

    Quote from ErraticThinkerRN
    Truthfully, I'm still waiting for a counter argument that doesn't imply that i'm anti-nurse, or not experienced enough to understand, or in some way am demeaning and personal because I'm making points that aren't exactly popular among nurses, or pointing out arguments that are just factually incorrect. You said to be more open minded. I'll challenge you to do the same.

    Coming from a business background & going into nursing gives me a slightly different perspective - I kinda see nurses catching heat for decisions made way further up the food chain. At different clinical sites, I've been able to see some of the real-world repercussions of well-intentioned changes. Like putting saline flushes in the Pyxis.. With benefits, you're paying someone $60+ per hour to go fetch a $0.25 item, instead of grabbing a handful at the beginning of the shift & working efficiently. Too often, management seems to enjoy "managing" things more than they need to, stepping over dollars to pick up dimes.


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