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brandy1017 28,311 Views

Joined Jun 30, '02. Posts: 1,990 (67% Liked) Likes: 4,312

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  • Jul 19

    Since you know what you want and it is not easy to come by do you have any connections from your chemist days to get a foot in the door. I just watched some inspiring Ted talks on Youtube about getting the attention and response from hiring managers. Check out Why your job applications are getting ignored by Jean-Michel Gauthier and another one How to land your dream job with one email by Edward Druce. They offer a couple different ideas about getting noticed to help get the job you want. There are others on youtube that I haven't viewed. Maybe they will give you some ideas to help you find the job you are really interested in.

  • Jul 17

    I don't envy them and after reading other comments I realized nothing I say is adequate in the face of what others have gone through or are going through. I wish everyone that is struggling peace and healing.

  • Jul 16

    Quote from live4ward
    I'm a licensed psychologist working for a federal agency. I've been thinking about lack of job flexibility as I get older, with plans to work a long time because I'm in great health and have no reason to stop. I've also developed a great love for working with mind/body condtions (board certified in biofeedback and lots of experience now with chronic pain, insomnia, and all kinds of stress-related disorders), and I've begun to really thinking about a career change to nursing. If I got into school in the next couple of years (and truly left my other career behind), I'd have an Associates and be starting as a new nurse in my late 50s. It's a late start and a big pay cut. But I think I'd love the work (probably in a local hospital setting depending on what opportunities are there) and would be in it for the long haul. I've been a psychologist for 22 years. Any thoughts? Will a brand new baby nurse get hired at age 57 or 58? Can I keep up with this younger generation (whom, by the way, I deeply respect and find to be so very smart and resourceful)? Will I even get a chance to try?
    I don't understand your situation, wouldn't you be eligible for retirement at 25 years with a pension from the govt and paid healthcare. I have family and friends in govt jobs and they have such incredible benefits. Working as a nurse in the private sector, that is not the case. Most places don't even offer pensions anymore, let alone retiree health insurance. They only offer a 403b with a modest match.

    In another post you mentioned a long commute, couldn't you move closer. Another option is AirBnB to find low cost rentals near where you work.

    While I find my job frustrating and stressful and have heard other options are less stressful such as home care or clinic, I would not voluntarily take a pay cut. But I see many women who don't seem to mind taking a paycut and I don't really understand why. You will still have the same bills and if you go back to college you'll have even more student loans to pay back. This is the time in your life when you should be paying off all your debts including your mortgage and saving for retirement, not going into debt for a job which you say yourself would be a big pay cut! It just doesn't make sense to me.

    I've worked other jobs and can say nursing is the most stressful, difficult job out there. I wish I could afford to go back to being a secretary. I would never complain about being bored after what I've been through as a nurse. I would just be so grateful to have a pleasant job where you aren't overworked and where you can actually get a leisurely lunch. Nursing is like working on an assembly line.

  • Jul 16

    I don't envy them and after reading other comments I realized nothing I say is adequate in the face of what others have gone through or are going through. I wish everyone that is struggling peace and healing.

  • Jul 15

    Quote from live4ward
    I'm a licensed psychologist working for a federal agency. I've been thinking about lack of job flexibility as I get older, with plans to work a long time because I'm in great health and have no reason to stop. I've also developed a great love for working with mind/body condtions (board certified in biofeedback and lots of experience now with chronic pain, insomnia, and all kinds of stress-related disorders), and I've begun to really thinking about a career change to nursing. If I got into school in the next couple of years (and truly left my other career behind), I'd have an Associates and be starting as a new nurse in my late 50s. It's a late start and a big pay cut. But I think I'd love the work (probably in a local hospital setting depending on what opportunities are there) and would be in it for the long haul. I've been a psychologist for 22 years. Any thoughts? Will a brand new baby nurse get hired at age 57 or 58? Can I keep up with this younger generation (whom, by the way, I deeply respect and find to be so very smart and resourceful)? Will I even get a chance to try?
    I don't understand your situation, wouldn't you be eligible for retirement at 25 years with a pension from the govt and paid healthcare. I have family and friends in govt jobs and they have such incredible benefits. Working as a nurse in the private sector, that is not the case. Most places don't even offer pensions anymore, let alone retiree health insurance. They only offer a 403b with a modest match.

    In another post you mentioned a long commute, couldn't you move closer. Another option is AirBnB to find low cost rentals near where you work.

    While I find my job frustrating and stressful and have heard other options are less stressful such as home care or clinic, I would not voluntarily take a pay cut. But I see many women who don't seem to mind taking a paycut and I don't really understand why. You will still have the same bills and if you go back to college you'll have even more student loans to pay back. This is the time in your life when you should be paying off all your debts including your mortgage and saving for retirement, not going into debt for a job which you say yourself would be a big pay cut! It just doesn't make sense to me.

    I've worked other jobs and can say nursing is the most stressful, difficult job out there. I wish I could afford to go back to being a secretary. I would never complain about being bored after what I've been through as a nurse. I would just be so grateful to have a pleasant job where you aren't overworked and where you can actually get a leisurely lunch. Nursing is like working on an assembly line.

  • Jul 15

    I wouldn't recommend nursing. You've got a good gig with great federal benefits, why throw it away to be overworked and stressed to the max and end up with more student loans. Flexibility? Why because 12 hour shifts? I can't think of any good reason to give up what you have now.

    I'm not interesting in rehashing all the negatives, read thru my many posts and those of others. If you are smart you'll stay where you are. You can always volunteer at a hospital or nursing home if you feel the need to make more of a difference.

  • Jul 15

    I don't envy them and after reading other comments I realized nothing I say is adequate in the face of what others have gone through or are going through. I wish everyone that is struggling peace and healing.

  • Jul 13

    Quote from live4ward
    I'm a licensed psychologist working for a federal agency. I've been thinking about lack of job flexibility as I get older, with plans to work a long time because I'm in great health and have no reason to stop. I've also developed a great love for working with mind/body condtions (board certified in biofeedback and lots of experience now with chronic pain, insomnia, and all kinds of stress-related disorders), and I've begun to really thinking about a career change to nursing. If I got into school in the next couple of years (and truly left my other career behind), I'd have an Associates and be starting as a new nurse in my late 50s. It's a late start and a big pay cut. But I think I'd love the work (probably in a local hospital setting depending on what opportunities are there) and would be in it for the long haul. I've been a psychologist for 22 years. Any thoughts? Will a brand new baby nurse get hired at age 57 or 58? Can I keep up with this younger generation (whom, by the way, I deeply respect and find to be so very smart and resourceful)? Will I even get a chance to try?
    I don't understand your situation, wouldn't you be eligible for retirement at 25 years with a pension from the govt and paid healthcare. I have family and friends in govt jobs and they have such incredible benefits. Working as a nurse in the private sector, that is not the case. Most places don't even offer pensions anymore, let alone retiree health insurance. They only offer a 403b with a modest match.

    In another post you mentioned a long commute, couldn't you move closer. Another option is AirBnB to find low cost rentals near where you work.

    While I find my job frustrating and stressful and have heard other options are less stressful such as home care or clinic, I would not voluntarily take a pay cut. But I see many women who don't seem to mind taking a paycut and I don't really understand why. You will still have the same bills and if you go back to college you'll have even more student loans to pay back. This is the time in your life when you should be paying off all your debts including your mortgage and saving for retirement, not going into debt for a job which you say yourself would be a big pay cut! It just doesn't make sense to me.

    I've worked other jobs and can say nursing is the most stressful, difficult job out there. I wish I could afford to go back to being a secretary. I would never complain about being bored after what I've been through as a nurse. I would just be so grateful to have a pleasant job where you aren't overworked and where you can actually get a leisurely lunch. Nursing is like working on an assembly line.

  • Jul 13

    I wouldn't recommend nursing. You've got a good gig with great federal benefits, why throw it away to be overworked and stressed to the max and end up with more student loans. Flexibility? Why because 12 hour shifts? I can't think of any good reason to give up what you have now.

    I'm not interesting in rehashing all the negatives, read thru my many posts and those of others. If you are smart you'll stay where you are. You can always volunteer at a hospital or nursing home if you feel the need to make more of a difference.

  • Jul 13

    I wouldn't recommend nursing. You've got a good gig with great federal benefits, why throw it away to be overworked and stressed to the max and end up with more student loans. Flexibility? Why because 12 hour shifts? I can't think of any good reason to give up what you have now.

    I'm not interesting in rehashing all the negatives, read thru my many posts and those of others. If you are smart you'll stay where you are. You can always volunteer at a hospital or nursing home if you feel the need to make more of a difference.

  • Jul 13

    Quote from live4ward
    I'm a licensed psychologist working for a federal agency. I've been thinking about lack of job flexibility as I get older, with plans to work a long time because I'm in great health and have no reason to stop. I've also developed a great love for working with mind/body condtions (board certified in biofeedback and lots of experience now with chronic pain, insomnia, and all kinds of stress-related disorders), and I've begun to really thinking about a career change to nursing. If I got into school in the next couple of years (and truly left my other career behind), I'd have an Associates and be starting as a new nurse in my late 50s. It's a late start and a big pay cut. But I think I'd love the work (probably in a local hospital setting depending on what opportunities are there) and would be in it for the long haul. I've been a psychologist for 22 years. Any thoughts? Will a brand new baby nurse get hired at age 57 or 58? Can I keep up with this younger generation (whom, by the way, I deeply respect and find to be so very smart and resourceful)? Will I even get a chance to try?
    I don't understand your situation, wouldn't you be eligible for retirement at 25 years with a pension from the govt and paid healthcare. I have family and friends in govt jobs and they have such incredible benefits. Working as a nurse in the private sector, that is not the case. Most places don't even offer pensions anymore, let alone retiree health insurance. They only offer a 403b with a modest match.

    In another post you mentioned a long commute, couldn't you move closer. Another option is AirBnB to find low cost rentals near where you work.

    While I find my job frustrating and stressful and have heard other options are less stressful such as home care or clinic, I would not voluntarily take a pay cut. But I see many women who don't seem to mind taking a paycut and I don't really understand why. You will still have the same bills and if you go back to college you'll have even more student loans to pay back. This is the time in your life when you should be paying off all your debts including your mortgage and saving for retirement, not going into debt for a job which you say yourself would be a big pay cut! It just doesn't make sense to me.

    I've worked other jobs and can say nursing is the most stressful, difficult job out there. I wish I could afford to go back to being a secretary. I would never complain about being bored after what I've been through as a nurse. I would just be so grateful to have a pleasant job where you aren't overworked and where you can actually get a leisurely lunch. Nursing is like working on an assembly line.

  • Jul 13

    I wouldn't recommend nursing. You've got a good gig with great federal benefits, why throw it away to be overworked and stressed to the max and end up with more student loans. Flexibility? Why because 12 hour shifts? I can't think of any good reason to give up what you have now.

    I'm not interesting in rehashing all the negatives, read thru my many posts and those of others. If you are smart you'll stay where you are. You can always volunteer at a hospital or nursing home if you feel the need to make more of a difference.

  • Jul 13

    Quote from live4ward
    I'm a licensed psychologist working for a federal agency. I've been thinking about lack of job flexibility as I get older, with plans to work a long time because I'm in great health and have no reason to stop. I've also developed a great love for working with mind/body condtions (board certified in biofeedback and lots of experience now with chronic pain, insomnia, and all kinds of stress-related disorders), and I've begun to really thinking about a career change to nursing. If I got into school in the next couple of years (and truly left my other career behind), I'd have an Associates and be starting as a new nurse in my late 50s. It's a late start and a big pay cut. But I think I'd love the work (probably in a local hospital setting depending on what opportunities are there) and would be in it for the long haul. I've been a psychologist for 22 years. Any thoughts? Will a brand new baby nurse get hired at age 57 or 58? Can I keep up with this younger generation (whom, by the way, I deeply respect and find to be so very smart and resourceful)? Will I even get a chance to try?
    I don't understand your situation, wouldn't you be eligible for retirement at 25 years with a pension from the govt and paid healthcare. I have family and friends in govt jobs and they have such incredible benefits. Working as a nurse in the private sector, that is not the case. Most places don't even offer pensions anymore, let alone retiree health insurance. They only offer a 403b with a modest match.

    In another post you mentioned a long commute, couldn't you move closer. Another option is AirBnB to find low cost rentals near where you work.

    While I find my job frustrating and stressful and have heard other options are less stressful such as home care or clinic, I would not voluntarily take a pay cut. But I see many women who don't seem to mind taking a paycut and I don't really understand why. You will still have the same bills and if you go back to college you'll have even more student loans to pay back. This is the time in your life when you should be paying off all your debts including your mortgage and saving for retirement, not going into debt for a job which you say yourself would be a big pay cut! It just doesn't make sense to me.

    I've worked other jobs and can say nursing is the most stressful, difficult job out there. I wish I could afford to go back to being a secretary. I would never complain about being bored after what I've been through as a nurse. I would just be so grateful to have a pleasant job where you aren't overworked and where you can actually get a leisurely lunch. Nursing is like working on an assembly line.

  • Jul 13

    I wouldn't recommend nursing. You've got a good gig with great federal benefits, why throw it away to be overworked and stressed to the max and end up with more student loans. Flexibility? Why because 12 hour shifts? I can't think of any good reason to give up what you have now.

    I'm not interesting in rehashing all the negatives, read thru my many posts and those of others. If you are smart you'll stay where you are. You can always volunteer at a hospital or nursing home if you feel the need to make more of a difference.

  • Jul 13

    I wouldn't recommend nursing. You've got a good gig with great federal benefits, why throw it away to be overworked and stressed to the max and end up with more student loans. Flexibility? Why because 12 hour shifts? I can't think of any good reason to give up what you have now.

    I'm not interesting in rehashing all the negatives, read thru my many posts and those of others. If you are smart you'll stay where you are. You can always volunteer at a hospital or nursing home if you feel the need to make more of a difference.


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