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brandy1017 32,737 Views

Joined: Jun 30, '02; Posts: 2,106 (67% Liked) ; Likes: 4,700

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  • 11:39 am

    Quote from Studentworker
    I did not post this to get hammered about my car. If you did not read correctly I am 20 years old and an undergrad. I work 9 hours a week at my other job and pay for other bills. My parents do not pay for really anything for me, so please do not say "get a new car", because that is the least helpful advice to someone who does not have even a percentage of the money to buy that. Hence the "student worker". I do not plan on being a nurse, and I think I'm smart enough to know that living in a snowy climate requires a good car. However, again, I am 20 years old. I didn't get to CHOOSE where I live and was raised. When I HAVE a career and actual income, I will have a safer car. Not all of you were born with money I'm assuming, so perhaps be understanding.
    For your own sake please get some safer tires so you won't end up injured or dead from a car crash. You might be able to get them for less from a junkyard.

    Thankfully you are a student and jobs will come and go. It's too bad they fired you sounds like they were a crappy employer. Don't understand how you only get $20 that's less than minimum wage! Next time just call in sick.

    Several years ago several nurses were fired in DC for not being able to get to work during a blizzard when the roads were literally undriveable. Fortunately most employers are not that uncaring. Where I work they will offer bonuses for nurses to stay overnight if their is a snow emergency, they were even paid for their sleep and food provided and empty hospital beds to sleep in and shower. In the morning most were sent home as enough day shift workers were able to get in to work.

  • Feb 23

    We have essential oils, they were rolled out a couple years ago but I've never used them for patients. Seems like a silly fad if you ask me. Offerings were lavender, peppermint, orange and maybe rosemary. Frankly, the only smell I like is orange. Peppermint I can't stand because it is the go-to for a code brown! I don't really know anyone on my unit that uses them for patients and I don't even know who supplies them. We never put them on people, they were meant to be put on a cotton ball in a med cup to help with nausea, sleep, stress. I worked with a pool nurse that uses them at another hospital and takes the time to document before and after. Forget that the pain med documentation is too much, I'm not going to document essential oils on top of that. Like an OP said some people have asthma or allergies or don't like the scent. I can't stand rosemary or lavender. I like orange or jasmine. I usually use the orange to refresh myself if I think of it and if there is even a vial around. lol

  • Feb 23

    As to ACLS you'll find frequent changes in protocol with each new 2 year recert. They are constantly looking to find better ways to bring someone back from the dead so expect change.

    As to doing things different than school, in real life you are juggling multiple patients and in the ER there may be no limit, depending on how many peeps rush into ER and how many patients they are holding down there waiting for a bed in ICU or the floor so perfect charting takes a back seat to keeping patients safe and alive! You'll find older nurses chart less, the young ones usually over chart because that is what they are taught and they are worried about making a mistake or being sued!

    Truthfully there isn't time to chart perfectly and do everything to the latest protocol that some think tank educator comes up with. This brings to mind the micromanagement another ER nurse mentioned in the article here Knaves, fools, and the pitfalls of micromanagement and how new nurses were documenting to a T, but in the process patient's safety and real life needs were being put on the back burner. I wouldn't want to work in that ER when the pressure to do everything perfectly according to someone sitting in an ivory tower takes precedence over actual patient acuity and safety!

    Sadly while the protocols are meant for best practice and some spurred on by medicare demands and reimbursement, they are not always realistic due to the time constraints, number of patients and the need to keep everyone safe. All you can do is do your best to follow the protocols while keeping patients safe. I would give stroke and MI protocols top billing over others as time is muscle and may make the difference between life and death! Also the post code hypothermia protocol may make the difference between a high quality normal life to those who survive a code!

  • Feb 23

    Wow! The micromanagement you describe is over the top. I'd be looking for a new job! That's one thing we don't have to worry about where we work because we have so few admin staff left! lol

  • Feb 23

    Quote from nervousnurse
    Ugh, I have the recurrent nightmare of not knowing a patient was assigned to me, too!

    I worked NICU many years ago, and have had many dreams where I take care of the babies in my house.

    One nightmare no one has mentioned yet is about SCHOOL----I'm about to graduate, but realize there's a class I
    didn't take!
    I sometimes have a dream that I'm taking care of patients in a house, sometimes its mine, sometimes it's another family members with a patient in every room. And I'm always busy and running around and wondering why the patients are there.

    When my grandma was alive I'd dream I was visiting her and working pool at the local hospital and getting lost on the way there and being afraid to work at a hospital I didn't know. I'm not someone that would do agency lol. I need stability, but in the beginning I thought I would move up north by her and work at that hospital. We were very close and I'd been to the hospital when she was a patient. It was actually a beautiful hospital with the rooms arranged around a courtyard so every room had a view! In reality I got a job at a hospital in the city I was born and just spent my off time visiting her frequently hence the dream I'd pick up a shift at the hospital while I was visiting her. Never did it in real life though.

  • Feb 23

    As to ACLS you'll find frequent changes in protocol with each new 2 year recert. They are constantly looking to find better ways to bring someone back from the dead so expect change.

    As to doing things different than school, in real life you are juggling multiple patients and in the ER there may be no limit, depending on how many peeps rush into ER and how many patients they are holding down there waiting for a bed in ICU or the floor so perfect charting takes a back seat to keeping patients safe and alive! You'll find older nurses chart less, the young ones usually over chart because that is what they are taught and they are worried about making a mistake or being sued!

    Truthfully there isn't time to chart perfectly and do everything to the latest protocol that some think tank educator comes up with. This brings to mind the micromanagement another ER nurse mentioned in the article here Knaves, fools, and the pitfalls of micromanagement and how new nurses were documenting to a T, but in the process patient's safety and real life needs were being put on the back burner. I wouldn't want to work in that ER when the pressure to do everything perfectly according to someone sitting in an ivory tower takes precedence over actual patient acuity and safety!

    Sadly while the protocols are meant for best practice and some spurred on by medicare demands and reimbursement, they are not always realistic due to the time constraints, number of patients and the need to keep everyone safe. All you can do is do your best to follow the protocols while keeping patients safe. I would give stroke and MI protocols top billing over others as time is muscle and may make the difference between life and death! Also the post code hypothermia protocol may make the difference between a high quality normal life to those who survive a code!

  • Feb 23

    As to ACLS you'll find frequent changes in protocol with each new 2 year recert. They are constantly looking to find better ways to bring someone back from the dead so expect change.

    As to doing things different than school, in real life you are juggling multiple patients and in the ER there may be no limit, depending on how many peeps rush into ER and how many patients they are holding down there waiting for a bed in ICU or the floor so perfect charting takes a back seat to keeping patients safe and alive! You'll find older nurses chart less, the young ones usually over chart because that is what they are taught and they are worried about making a mistake or being sued!

    Truthfully there isn't time to chart perfectly and do everything to the latest protocol that some think tank educator comes up with. This brings to mind the micromanagement another ER nurse mentioned in the article here Knaves, fools, and the pitfalls of micromanagement and how new nurses were documenting to a T, but in the process patient's safety and real life needs were being put on the back burner. I wouldn't want to work in that ER when the pressure to do everything perfectly according to someone sitting in an ivory tower takes precedence over actual patient acuity and safety!

    Sadly while the protocols are meant for best practice and some spurred on by medicare demands and reimbursement, they are not always realistic due to the time constraints, number of patients and the need to keep everyone safe. All you can do is do your best to follow the protocols while keeping patients safe. I would give stroke and MI protocols top billing over others as time is muscle and may make the difference between life and death! Also the post code hypothermia protocol may make the difference between a high quality normal life to those who survive a code!

  • Feb 23

    As to ACLS you'll find frequent changes in protocol with each new 2 year recert. They are constantly looking to find better ways to bring someone back from the dead so expect change.

    As to doing things different than school, in real life you are juggling multiple patients and in the ER there may be no limit, depending on how many peeps rush into ER and how many patients they are holding down there waiting for a bed in ICU or the floor so perfect charting takes a back seat to keeping patients safe and alive! You'll find older nurses chart less, the young ones usually over chart because that is what they are taught and they are worried about making a mistake or being sued!

    Truthfully there isn't time to chart perfectly and do everything to the latest protocol that some think tank educator comes up with. This brings to mind the micromanagement another ER nurse mentioned in the article here Knaves, fools, and the pitfalls of micromanagement and how new nurses were documenting to a T, but in the process patient's safety and real life needs were being put on the back burner. I wouldn't want to work in that ER when the pressure to do everything perfectly according to someone sitting in an ivory tower takes precedence over actual patient acuity and safety!

    Sadly while the protocols are meant for best practice and some spurred on by medicare demands and reimbursement, they are not always realistic due to the time constraints, number of patients and the need to keep everyone safe. All you can do is do your best to follow the protocols while keeping patients safe. I would give stroke and MI protocols top billing over others as time is muscle and may make the difference between life and death! Also the post code hypothermia protocol may make the difference between a high quality normal life to those who survive a code!

  • Feb 21

    You didn't say what your current job is and what it entails. You didn't mention what your MSN is in. Is it in management or education? Is your current job relevant to the jobs you are applying for? Frankly MSN's are a dime a dozen and I think anyone can get one if they are motivated and willing to spend the money. It sounds like you are applying for management jobs. I can tell you from the corporate healthcare system that has taken over my hospital they run things lean and mean; the least staff they can get away with both for staff nurses and admin, management and educators. There may be a glut of MSN Rn's you are competing with, who may have more relevant experience, plus ageism is everywhere. You don't say how overweight you are but I do believe for management jobs the better your appearance and ideal weight the more of an advantage you have. As a staff nurse, especially working off hours, there is less emphasis on appearance.

    My hospital has laid off so many supervisors and educators it is ridiculous. Those people with current hospital experience are going to have an edge over someone who doesn't have said experience and is working in a non-hospital setting. Even for them, things are rough, two of our CNO's who were fired over the years found it took a year to find another job and one is living in a rural area around 200 miles away from her home! We had a wonderful, caring educator who was in her 50's and morbidly obese who was let go due to a political shakeup and it took her 6 months to get a job. In the end, she got a job working as an educator at the local university. These are not good paying jobs, you are adjunct faculty, usually without benefits paid by the class. Thankfully the university union offered health insurance for adjuncts and she already had her house paid off. She was a wonderful person and a great nurse and a blessing to her students. Unfortunately, she had many health problems and died unexpectedly, probably from a cardiopulmonary event.

    My advice to you is to look outside the box. What is wrong with the current job you have? Pay or is it not prestigious enough? Some options to consider are working as adjunct faculty teaching nursing students or looking for a job in a nursing home or assisted living facility or working your way up to management from home health. They may be more open to you than a hospital that is running lean and mean and wants relevant experience.

    Let me tell you the people that were laid off were all excellent professionals with good credentials and liked by their peers and staff. It was a combination of politics, bad luck, and cost-cutting by corporate that cost them their jobs. They all were older, experienced and obviously paid more than the newer, younger ones that were kept. The ones that were kept were treated crappy too, more work piled on, changing work hours, from full time to part-time and off shifts on the whim of the guy at the top. They are being literally treated like widgets without respect or common decency! Of course, the staff nurses are treated the same! Several times the OP's kept had less education and experience so truthfully it was obvious it was wholly about the money!

  • Feb 21

    You didn't say what your current job is and what it entails. You didn't mention what your MSN is in. Is it in management or education? Is your current job relevant to the jobs you are applying for? Frankly MSN's are a dime a dozen and I think anyone can get one if they are motivated and willing to spend the money. It sounds like you are applying for management jobs. I can tell you from the corporate healthcare system that has taken over my hospital they run things lean and mean; the least staff they can get away with both for staff nurses and admin, management and educators. There may be a glut of MSN Rn's you are competing with, who may have more relevant experience, plus ageism is everywhere. You don't say how overweight you are but I do believe for management jobs the better your appearance and ideal weight the more of an advantage you have. As a staff nurse, especially working off hours, there is less emphasis on appearance.

    My hospital has laid off so many supervisors and educators it is ridiculous. Those people with current hospital experience are going to have an edge over someone who doesn't have said experience and is working in a non-hospital setting. Even for them, things are rough, two of our CNO's who were fired over the years found it took a year to find another job and one is living in a rural area around 200 miles away from her home! We had a wonderful, caring educator who was in her 50's and morbidly obese who was let go due to a political shakeup and it took her 6 months to get a job. In the end, she got a job working as an educator at the local university. These are not good paying jobs, you are adjunct faculty, usually without benefits paid by the class. Thankfully the university union offered health insurance for adjuncts and she already had her house paid off. She was a wonderful person and a great nurse and a blessing to her students. Unfortunately, she had many health problems and died unexpectedly, probably from a cardiopulmonary event.

    My advice to you is to look outside the box. What is wrong with the current job you have? Pay or is it not prestigious enough? Some options to consider are working as adjunct faculty teaching nursing students or looking for a job in a nursing home or assisted living facility or working your way up to management from home health. They may be more open to you than a hospital that is running lean and mean and wants relevant experience.

    Let me tell you the people that were laid off were all excellent professionals with good credentials and liked by their peers and staff. It was a combination of politics, bad luck, and cost-cutting by corporate that cost them their jobs. They all were older, experienced and obviously paid more than the newer, younger ones that were kept. The ones that were kept were treated crappy too, more work piled on, changing work hours, from full time to part-time and off shifts on the whim of the guy at the top. They are being literally treated like widgets without respect or common decency! Of course, the staff nurses are treated the same! Several times the OP's kept had less education and experience so truthfully it was obvious it was wholly about the money!

  • Feb 21

    We have essential oils, they were rolled out a couple years ago but I've never used them for patients. Seems like a silly fad if you ask me. Offerings were lavender, peppermint, orange and maybe rosemary. Frankly, the only smell I like is orange. Peppermint I can't stand because it is the go-to for a code brown! I don't really know anyone on my unit that uses them for patients and I don't even know who supplies them. We never put them on people, they were meant to be put on a cotton ball in a med cup to help with nausea, sleep, stress. I worked with a pool nurse that uses them at another hospital and takes the time to document before and after. Forget that the pain med documentation is too much, I'm not going to document essential oils on top of that. Like an OP said some people have asthma or allergies or don't like the scent. I can't stand rosemary or lavender. I like orange or jasmine. I usually use the orange to refresh myself if I think of it and if there is even a vial around. lol

  • Feb 21

    We have essential oils, they were rolled out a couple years ago but I've never used them for patients. Seems like a silly fad if you ask me. Offerings were lavender, peppermint, orange and maybe rosemary. Frankly, the only smell I like is orange. Peppermint I can't stand because it is the go-to for a code brown! I don't really know anyone on my unit that uses them for patients and I don't even know who supplies them. We never put them on people, they were meant to be put on a cotton ball in a med cup to help with nausea, sleep, stress. I worked with a pool nurse that uses them at another hospital and takes the time to document before and after. Forget that the pain med documentation is too much, I'm not going to document essential oils on top of that. Like an OP said some people have asthma or allergies or don't like the scent. I can't stand rosemary or lavender. I like orange or jasmine. I usually use the orange to refresh myself if I think of it and if there is even a vial around. lol

  • Feb 20

    You didn't say what your current job is and what it entails. You didn't mention what your MSN is in. Is it in management or education? Is your current job relevant to the jobs you are applying for? Frankly MSN's are a dime a dozen and I think anyone can get one if they are motivated and willing to spend the money. It sounds like you are applying for management jobs. I can tell you from the corporate healthcare system that has taken over my hospital they run things lean and mean; the least staff they can get away with both for staff nurses and admin, management and educators. There may be a glut of MSN Rn's you are competing with, who may have more relevant experience, plus ageism is everywhere. You don't say how overweight you are but I do believe for management jobs the better your appearance and ideal weight the more of an advantage you have. As a staff nurse, especially working off hours, there is less emphasis on appearance.

    My hospital has laid off so many supervisors and educators it is ridiculous. Those people with current hospital experience are going to have an edge over someone who doesn't have said experience and is working in a non-hospital setting. Even for them, things are rough, two of our CNO's who were fired over the years found it took a year to find another job and one is living in a rural area around 200 miles away from her home! We had a wonderful, caring educator who was in her 50's and morbidly obese who was let go due to a political shakeup and it took her 6 months to get a job. In the end, she got a job working as an educator at the local university. These are not good paying jobs, you are adjunct faculty, usually without benefits paid by the class. Thankfully the university union offered health insurance for adjuncts and she already had her house paid off. She was a wonderful person and a great nurse and a blessing to her students. Unfortunately, she had many health problems and died unexpectedly, probably from a cardiopulmonary event.

    My advice to you is to look outside the box. What is wrong with the current job you have? Pay or is it not prestigious enough? Some options to consider are working as adjunct faculty teaching nursing students or looking for a job in a nursing home or assisted living facility or working your way up to management from home health. They may be more open to you than a hospital that is running lean and mean and wants relevant experience.

    Let me tell you the people that were laid off were all excellent professionals with good credentials and liked by their peers and staff. It was a combination of politics, bad luck, and cost-cutting by corporate that cost them their jobs. They all were older, experienced and obviously paid more than the newer, younger ones that were kept. The ones that were kept were treated crappy too, more work piled on, changing work hours, from full time to part-time and off shifts on the whim of the guy at the top. They are being literally treated like widgets without respect or common decency! Of course, the staff nurses are treated the same! Several times the OP's kept had less education and experience so truthfully it was obvious it was wholly about the money!

  • Feb 20

    Quote from klone
    Sorry if I had a tantrum. It's just incredibly frustrating to have this issue that is literally keeping me awake at night, and then have people say that the problem doesn't really exist, and that I'm just holding out on hiring nurses because it's cheaper to make my current nurses work OT until they're exhausted and I'm trying to save some pennies.
    I believe you, it is just so many of us are cynical as we watch our employers not hire with various excuses when we live in urban areas with many nursing programs and we know in those situations it is all about the money.

    I figured the lack of rental housing was another problem for your hospital as most people aren't ready or able to buy a house off the bat. Could the hospital provide down-payment assistance? Back in the old days my old hospital system run by another non-profit actually provided down payment and home buying counseling free if we bought houses in the city. It was a true non-profit back then and cared about its staff! I miss those good old days!

  • Feb 19

    Quote from Mavrick
    You are in an alert patient's room talking on the phone with a Dr. about another patient????
    Your poor judgement has many facets.

    As other have suggested, your definition of abuse is suspect. Crying over a piece of paper with definitions? If you want to make the NP's attempt to educate an act of abuse then you are making much ado about nothing.

    Stay home. You're not ready for nursing IRL.
    She probably answered the ringing phone in her pocket. What was she supposed to do hit the decline button? Tempting I know lol. Next time just remember to leave the room, not a big deal. Now the OP knows she was overreacting and should be able to handle these situations and recognize the NP handout was simply a teaching moment. Cut her some slack, you live and learn. It takes time, practice, experience, teamwork and a good mentor to grow as a nurse. We don't come out of the gate prepared for real-life nursing!


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