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Joined: Jun 30, '02; Posts: 2,159 (68% Liked) ; Likes: 4,860

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  • 11:58 am

    Quote from Nurselyfe92
    I just started traveling a couple months ago but before that I was at a non-profit hospital for three years. At my last job we also had travelers come and work with us. I think you just have to make sure with the travel agency that the hospital is non profit. I called the dept of edu today and they told me I was re-enrolled. What happened was I was paying a company to help me do the paperwork before I understood it all... turns out they weren't reliable and apparently putting my loan in forebearance more than just the couple months they told me about. Therefore, I'm going to talk to a family friend of my that's a contract lawyer to see if she can do anything. I cancelled their service. It's a long story but basically it was a huge scam it turns out. Now that I'm doing my own paperwork (the company I was paying told me I wouldn't be able to get into the loan forgiveness program without paying for their service) it shouldn't happen. Only up from here I suppose!
    Even the student loan companies like Navient formerly Sallie Mae have been notorious about steering people into forbearance instead of loan forgiveness probably because it increases their profit margins as the interest accumulates and capitalizes on the debt.

    Personally I don't trust the student loan forgiveness route and would consider other options in case it doesn't work out. Joining the military or the VA comes with significant student loan debt repayment as a perk.

  • 8:12 am

    Quote from Nurselyfe92
    Yes the first poster isn't who I was referring to. Also I was at the same hospital for three years and for the first year the loan forgiveness was approved I was working at an underprivileged hospital. That's why I was confused when they disqualified me. In my contract it states they would help with rental car expenses if needed, but when I brought it up they said it would just come out of my paycheck.
    Were you working as a traveler when it was first approved? All I know about the forgiveness program is you have to work for a qualified non-profit and have to renew every year.

    I would suggest you learn about personal finance, some good books are Deal with your debt by Liz Weston and Personal Finace for Dummies by Eric Tyson. A useful budget is 50% needs, 20% savings & debt repayment and 30% wants, but in your case I would reverse it and do 30% for debt repayment instead.

    I imagine you have private as well as public loans. Look at the interest rates and pay the higher interest rate loans first which I assume would be private loans. Have you consolidated your govt public loans? Doing so you could stretch out the repayment period beyond the standard 10 years. Granted the downside is paying more interest. Your student loans must be your first priority, pay at least the minimum. Public student loans have options of deferment or forbearance but these will only postpone the inevitable repayment and increase your debt from the capitalized interest so do this as only a last resort. Bankrate.com has calculators that can show you how much interest each loan is accruing monthly and how much your payment will reduce the principal (student loan itself).

    Also if you have any co-signers it is essential that you make the payments and you may have to take out a life insurance policy with your co-signer as the beneficiary for the private loans because if something happened to you, they would still be expected to pay off the loan.

    Be aware that there are no bankruptcy options for student loans. If you stop making payments you will default within 9 months and then the fees and penalties are around 25% of the loan which can double or triple the loan, plus your pay can be garnished and tax refunds taken and even your social security garnished to repay the loan. Worse some states will take away your license to work as a nurse if you default! Frankly, it is the worst debt out there and it makes me sick that everyone pushes young inexperienced teens to go to college without even a personal finance class and the knowledge of how dangerous this debt can be.

    On the brighter side, at least you chose a useful degree and nursing pays well compared to most jobs that college grads get. Plus you have the option for overtime.

    You might want to check out Dave Ramsey too and his advice could help jumpstart your way of out of student loan debt sooner than later, but take him with a grain of salt and compare Liz Weston's advice and see which suits you best!

    Good luck to you!

  • 12:29 am

    That is totally ridiculous! There are times when the med won't scan and you have to manually enter it. I'm glad I don't work for your place. In the past they have reviewed are scan percentages and if they were less than 90% we were spoken to. Frankly micromanagement to the nth degree! But now many admin were laid off so I doubt anyone will be checking any of our documentation anymore. lol

  • May 22

    Quote from Nurselyfe92
    Hey guys,

    so im in a ton of student loan debt about $110k to be exact. Found out last week debt of edu disqualified me from the loan forgiveness program TWO years ago despite turning in all my paperwork. I never got any letter/email stating they were disqualifying me either. I just happened to stumble upon some small print after I logged in to my account last week to make a payment. Needless to say I've been extremely stressed and feel like I'm drowning. I almost made a couple mistakes while at work because I think subconsciously I'm so stressed and distracted about my loans...then that made me even more stressed thinking about how I could've potentially harmed a patient (looking at the wrong patients lab results and almost replacing potassium when it was
    already elevated). Thankfully I caught myself before giving it but I feel stuck. Plus I'm a travel nurse so I feel like my license is even more on the line at times. Always wanted to move out of the country or do a mission trip overseas for 6 months, but feel like I can't even do what I've always dreamed about because of my loans.

    On top of it my car broke down and my travel agency won't help me out. They said they would take the cost out of my paycheck. So I went and rented a car myself and ended up denting it on a short pole that I couldnt see when backing out of a driveway. 🤯

    Any advice on loans, how you deal with stress, etc would be helpful!

    thanks all
    This is a warning to all those who are counting on federal student loan forgiveness. From what I've read it's common to be disqualified and few get the loan forgiveness in the end, resulting in even more debt to be paid back due to negative amortization where the interest capitalizes increasing the loan when you make income based payments that are less than the monthly accumulated interest.

    I'm surprised you would think you would qualify for loan forgiveness if you are working as a traveler because my understanding is you must work for a non-profit and I don't think travel agencies are non profit.

    Is it working for the travel agency that disqualified you? I suggest you look for further advice from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to see if it is possible to restart the loan forgiveness option if you get a nursing job working for a non-profit hospital. Unfortunately even if this is possible, the years you've already paid in most likely won't count; also Trump and the republicans want to get rid of loan forgiveness altogether.

  • May 21

    Quote from Nurselyfe92
    Yes the first poster isn't who I was referring to. Also I was at the same hospital for three years and for the first year the loan forgiveness was approved I was working at an underprivileged hospital. That's why I was confused when they disqualified me. In my contract it states they would help with rental car expenses if needed, but when I brought it up they said it would just come out of my paycheck.
    Were you working as a traveler when it was first approved? All I know about the forgiveness program is you have to work for a qualified non-profit and have to renew every year.

    I would suggest you learn about personal finance, some good books are Deal with your debt by Liz Weston and Personal Finace for Dummies by Eric Tyson. A useful budget is 50% needs, 20% savings & debt repayment and 30% wants, but in your case I would reverse it and do 30% for debt repayment instead.

    I imagine you have private as well as public loans. Look at the interest rates and pay the higher interest rate loans first which I assume would be private loans. Have you consolidated your govt public loans? Doing so you could stretch out the repayment period beyond the standard 10 years. Granted the downside is paying more interest. Your student loans must be your first priority, pay at least the minimum. Public student loans have options of deferment or forbearance but these will only postpone the inevitable repayment and increase your debt from the capitalized interest so do this as only a last resort. Bankrate.com has calculators that can show you how much interest each loan is accruing monthly and how much your payment will reduce the principal (student loan itself).

    Also if you have any co-signers it is essential that you make the payments and you may have to take out a life insurance policy with your co-signer as the beneficiary for the private loans because if something happened to you, they would still be expected to pay off the loan.

    Be aware that there are no bankruptcy options for student loans. If you stop making payments you will default within 9 months and then the fees and penalties are around 25% of the loan which can double or triple the loan, plus your pay can be garnished and tax refunds taken and even your social security garnished to repay the loan. Worse some states will take away your license to work as a nurse if you default! Frankly, it is the worst debt out there and it makes me sick that everyone pushes young inexperienced teens to go to college without even a personal finance class and the knowledge of how dangerous this debt can be.

    On the brighter side, at least you chose a useful degree and nursing pays well compared to most jobs that college grads get. Plus you have the option for overtime.

    You might want to check out Dave Ramsey too and his advice could help jumpstart your way of out of student loan debt sooner than later, but take him with a grain of salt and compare Liz Weston's advice and see which suits you best!

    Good luck to you!

  • May 21

    Quote from Nurselyfe92
    Yes the first poster isn't who I was referring to. Also I was at the same hospital for three years and for the first year the loan forgiveness was approved I was working at an underprivileged hospital. That's why I was confused when they disqualified me. In my contract it states they would help with rental car expenses if needed, but when I brought it up they said it would just come out of my paycheck.
    Were you working as a traveler when it was first approved? All I know about the forgiveness program is you have to work for a qualified non-profit and have to renew every year.

    I would suggest you learn about personal finance, some good books are Deal with your debt by Liz Weston and Personal Finace for Dummies by Eric Tyson. A useful budget is 50% needs, 20% savings & debt repayment and 30% wants, but in your case I would reverse it and do 30% for debt repayment instead.

    I imagine you have private as well as public loans. Look at the interest rates and pay the higher interest rate loans first which I assume would be private loans. Have you consolidated your govt public loans? Doing so you could stretch out the repayment period beyond the standard 10 years. Granted the downside is paying more interest. Your student loans must be your first priority, pay at least the minimum. Public student loans have options of deferment or forbearance but these will only postpone the inevitable repayment and increase your debt from the capitalized interest so do this as only a last resort. Bankrate.com has calculators that can show you how much interest each loan is accruing monthly and how much your payment will reduce the principal (student loan itself).

    Also if you have any co-signers it is essential that you make the payments and you may have to take out a life insurance policy with your co-signer as the beneficiary for the private loans because if something happened to you, they would still be expected to pay off the loan.

    Be aware that there are no bankruptcy options for student loans. If you stop making payments you will default within 9 months and then the fees and penalties are around 25% of the loan which can double or triple the loan, plus your pay can be garnished and tax refunds taken and even your social security garnished to repay the loan. Worse some states will take away your license to work as a nurse if you default! Frankly, it is the worst debt out there and it makes me sick that everyone pushes young inexperienced teens to go to college without even a personal finance class and the knowledge of how dangerous this debt can be.

    On the brighter side, at least you chose a useful degree and nursing pays well compared to most jobs that college grads get. Plus you have the option for overtime.

    You might want to check out Dave Ramsey too and his advice could help jumpstart your way of out of student loan debt sooner than later, but take him with a grain of salt and compare Liz Weston's advice and see which suits you best!

    Good luck to you!

  • May 16

    I really don't care about nurses week or feel the need for a token gift or acknowlegement from management. I would much rather they spent their money on hiring enough nurses and having good working conditions with decent patient ratios, working equipment and adequate supplies. What's the point of a yearly gift or party when they run short staffed and mandate most of the year rather than simply hire enough staff in the first place!

  • May 15

    I really don't care about nurses week or feel the need for a token gift or acknowlegement from management. I would much rather they spent their money on hiring enough nurses and having good working conditions with decent patient ratios, working equipment and adequate supplies. What's the point of a yearly gift or party when they run short staffed and mandate most of the year rather than simply hire enough staff in the first place!

  • May 14

    I'm apparently in the minority because I agree with you that there is too much micromanagement and privacy invasion in nursing. Things didn't use to be this way. Back when I first started nursing no one was drug tested for a job nor did the board question applicants' medical or mental health background. Flu shots weren't mandatory. Many here self riteously state it's your choice to work as a nurse so you need to accept these invasions of privacy or find another job. Frankly I think that is just sad. Why are nurses presumed guilty and required to submit to urine and hair samples to prove you are not a druggie? Why are so many nurses forced into "recovery" programs if they have a mental health illness?

    All this concern is justified for patient safety, while the majority of nurses are working with unsafe patient ratios, short staffed, and cajoled to work overtime as a staffing strategy. Never mind that many of these nurses don't get enough sleep and either feel coerced by their "duty" to pick up extra hours to help the unit or are simply mandated to work 16 hours because they are too important to go home. Where is the concern over patient safety here? The very structure and staffing at many hospitals and nursing homes is frankly unsafe. It's a miracle there aren't more nursing errors under the circumstances. Also the stressful nature of nursing coupled with the short staffing aggravates anxiety and depression in many nurses.

    If administration really cared about safety they would hire enough nurses to staff appropriately in the first place eliminating short staffing and mandatory overtime. There would be low patient ratios. It wouldn't take an act of Congress to get safe needles like it did or the state of CA to get safe patient ratios.

    I'm simply glad I'm nearing retirement and won't have to deal with this much longer. Flame away! lol

  • May 12

    Quote from AnnieNP
    I have no problem with not hiring smokers, or offering and paying for health insurance to smokers. Maybe because 50% of our practice is pulmonary. Then again, I could consider smokers an annuity!
    That's a sad commentary. I see so many smokers and ex smokers struggling to breathe and sadly it is too late for them. It is terrible and I wish I could do more to alleviate their suffering. Even worse coworkers witnessing these patients struggle to breathe isn't enough for many to quit because the addiction is so strong. I worry about family members who smoke when I implore them to stop. I wouldn't wish the suffering of not being able to breathe on anyone, yet alone my worse enemy.

  • May 12

    It's true it's a slower pace and in my experience there is more of a team effort and a live and let live attitude, but the bottom line is can you sleep during the day and function ok. Some can, some can't. Nurse.com has a couple nurse CEU's about working night shift and tips to cope. I was really impressed by the webinars' and I had no idea how fatigue during the night shift have lead to many disasters outside of nursing like Chernobyl, Bhopal and the recent Navy crashes. Fortunately, it didn't leave it there it mentioned tips to get enough to rest such as wear sunglasses before you step outside after your shift, nap in your car if you aren't safe enough to drive home, try to have 4 hours of anchor sleep everyday at the same time such as 8-12 noon, taking melatonin before bed may help, and using blackout curtains and a sleep mask to block the light since light lowers melatonin in our body that we need to sleep. The presenter was excellent and started a night shift residency program to help prepare new grads. I was so impressed with her knowledge and qualifications. It was the best nursing presentation I've seen in years. I highly recommend checking the 2 courses on nurse.com Healthcare Fatigue and Fatigue Countermeasures (bonus they are free at this time) for anyone that is working night shift.

  • May 12

    I really don't care about nurses week or feel the need for a token gift or acknowlegement from management. I would much rather they spent their money on hiring enough nurses and having good working conditions with decent patient ratios, working equipment and adequate supplies. What's the point of a yearly gift or party when they run short staffed and mandate most of the year rather than simply hire enough staff in the first place!

  • May 11

    I'm apparently in the minority because I agree with you that there is too much micromanagement and privacy invasion in nursing. Things didn't use to be this way. Back when I first started nursing no one was drug tested for a job nor did the board question applicants' medical or mental health background. Flu shots weren't mandatory. Many here self riteously state it's your choice to work as a nurse so you need to accept these invasions of privacy or find another job. Frankly I think that is just sad. Why are nurses presumed guilty and required to submit to urine and hair samples to prove you are not a druggie? Why are so many nurses forced into "recovery" programs if they have a mental health illness?

    All this concern is justified for patient safety, while the majority of nurses are working with unsafe patient ratios, short staffed, and cajoled to work overtime as a staffing strategy. Never mind that many of these nurses don't get enough sleep and either feel coerced by their "duty" to pick up extra hours to help the unit or are simply mandated to work 16 hours because they are too important to go home. Where is the concern over patient safety here? The very structure and staffing at many hospitals and nursing homes is frankly unsafe. It's a miracle there aren't more nursing errors under the circumstances. Also the stressful nature of nursing coupled with the short staffing aggravates anxiety and depression in many nurses.

    If administration really cared about safety they would hire enough nurses to staff appropriately in the first place eliminating short staffing and mandatory overtime. There would be low patient ratios. It wouldn't take an act of Congress to get safe needles like it did or the state of CA to get safe patient ratios.

    I'm simply glad I'm nearing retirement and won't have to deal with this much longer. Flame away! lol

  • May 11

    I really don't care about nurses week or feel the need for a token gift or acknowlegement from management. I would much rather they spent their money on hiring enough nurses and having good working conditions with decent patient ratios, working equipment and adequate supplies. What's the point of a yearly gift or party when they run short staffed and mandate most of the year rather than simply hire enough staff in the first place!

  • May 11

    It's true it's a slower pace and in my experience there is more of a team effort and a live and let live attitude, but the bottom line is can you sleep during the day and function ok. Some can, some can't. Nurse.com has a couple nurse CEU's about working night shift and tips to cope. I was really impressed by the webinars' and I had no idea how fatigue during the night shift have lead to many disasters outside of nursing like Chernobyl, Bhopal and the recent Navy crashes. Fortunately, it didn't leave it there it mentioned tips to get enough to rest such as wear sunglasses before you step outside after your shift, nap in your car if you aren't safe enough to drive home, try to have 4 hours of anchor sleep everyday at the same time such as 8-12 noon, taking melatonin before bed may help, and using blackout curtains and a sleep mask to block the light since light lowers melatonin in our body that we need to sleep. The presenter was excellent and started a night shift residency program to help prepare new grads. I was so impressed with her knowledge and qualifications. It was the best nursing presentation I've seen in years. I highly recommend checking the 2 courses on nurse.com Healthcare Fatigue and Fatigue Countermeasures (bonus they are free at this time) for anyone that is working night shift.


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