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brandy1017 29,134 Views

Joined Jun 30, '02. Posts: 2,006 (67% Liked) Likes: 4,344

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  • 9:25 am

    I think it is foolish to not be interested in making a decent wage. Women tend to be underpaid relative to men and part of it is our own willingness to work for less and not being used to negotiating over pay. It makes no sense to work for less just because you "care" that is actually not caring about yourself and your family enough! Women tend to make less than men, live longer, have higher medical costs over the years, take time off of work to care for family so need money more than men! Save your caring above money to your off time when you can volunteer for a cause you believe in.

    I admit negotiating with your current employer might not pay off, but chances are if you do so with your next employer it will raise your pay. That is your best chance to earn more money. Money brings security, freedom, the ability to save for the future, enjoy hobbies or vacations, as well as help your family or give to charity. I doubt men would put money on the back burner. Why do you feel you have to prove yourself worthy of being a nurse by not wanting more money?

    I worry about my many low paid coworkers and how they will manage, short of having another source of income from a husband or boyfriend. I also wonder why so many don't try to better themselves as you are finally doing. When I say this I mean going back to school thru a low cost tech program, not wasting time on an overpriced, useless bachelors degree. I feel sorry for all the youngsters that have fallen for the BA/BS trap finding themselves indebted with a useless degree and many worse off financially for making the mistake to get a degree due to the student loan debt trap that follows!

  • Sep 25

    Quote from Purple_roses
    As a new nurse, I really appreciate this article. That night shift though! My body is NOT a fan.
    I love night shift, I would never do days it is just too busy and stressful and so many people interrupting you. I don't know how they do it!

  • Sep 21

    Yes many more nurses are planning on using bedside nursing as a paid residency and going on to NP. It is a viable alternative to medical school if you don't want to specialize, saves time, money and student loan debt. Also working conditions at the bedside are also leading many nurses to flee and pursue other options like NP and I don't blame them. They are really the smart ones as things are unlikely to improve with corporations running the show and trying to squeeze profit at the expense of patients and healthcare workers. If I was younger I would do it too. As it is I'm just counting down to retirement the sooner the better and saving all my money to retire early!

  • Sep 19

    Quote from Texasstudent0
    The extreme lack of diplomacy?? First and foremost my university has an open door policy. We are encouraged by our professors and by the Dean of Nursing to be vocal about any problems we may or may not have within the college. They want our feedback on our clinical instructors, they actually ask that we give feedback and fill out surveys on our experience with them. There is no extreme lack of diplomacy on my part by any means. She was just sticking up for me since most of these people on the thread are crude and distasteful. Some of you act like you were never a nursing student. It was one post. The majority of comments on here are accusatory based what they interpreted from the original post. A lot of "reading in between the lines" but they completely missed the boat.
    I think you are completely overreacting both about this one day at clinical and the comments from others. CNA skills are a useful and needed part of bedside nursing as others have pointed out. You should be paired up with nurses for the rest of your clinicals. But usually clinicals aren't enough and there is quite a culture shock when you have your first nursing job. I've only encountered a few nurses who were truly adequately prepared and they either had CNA, LPN or intern/extern experience or had an unusually lot of different clinicals working in a variety of different settings.

    That is why I suggested working as a CNA or applying for an intern or extern position if you have the chance. Hopefully in a few years you will look back on this experience as a minor blip and maybe even see some positives in it.

    Those you disagree with are probably trying to help you put things in perspective. Good luck with your nursing journey.

  • Sep 18

    Yes many more nurses are planning on using bedside nursing as a paid residency and going on to NP. It is a viable alternative to medical school if you don't want to specialize, saves time, money and student loan debt. Also working conditions at the bedside are also leading many nurses to flee and pursue other options like NP and I don't blame them. They are really the smart ones as things are unlikely to improve with corporations running the show and trying to squeeze profit at the expense of patients and healthcare workers. If I was younger I would do it too. As it is I'm just counting down to retirement the sooner the better and saving all my money to retire early!

  • Sep 18

    Yes many more nurses are planning on using bedside nursing as a paid residency and going on to NP. It is a viable alternative to medical school if you don't want to specialize, saves time, money and student loan debt. Also working conditions at the bedside are also leading many nurses to flee and pursue other options like NP and I don't blame them. They are really the smart ones as things are unlikely to improve with corporations running the show and trying to squeeze profit at the expense of patients and healthcare workers. If I was younger I would do it too. As it is I'm just counting down to retirement the sooner the better and saving all my money to retire early!

  • Sep 16

    Yes many more nurses are planning on using bedside nursing as a paid residency and going on to NP. It is a viable alternative to medical school if you don't want to specialize, saves time, money and student loan debt. Also working conditions at the bedside are also leading many nurses to flee and pursue other options like NP and I don't blame them. They are really the smart ones as things are unlikely to improve with corporations running the show and trying to squeeze profit at the expense of patients and healthcare workers. If I was younger I would do it too. As it is I'm just counting down to retirement the sooner the better and saving all my money to retire early!

  • Sep 16

    Yes many more nurses are planning on using bedside nursing as a paid residency and going on to NP. It is a viable alternative to medical school if you don't want to specialize, saves time, money and student loan debt. Also working conditions at the bedside are also leading many nurses to flee and pursue other options like NP and I don't blame them. They are really the smart ones as things are unlikely to improve with corporations running the show and trying to squeeze profit at the expense of patients and healthcare workers. If I was younger I would do it too. As it is I'm just counting down to retirement the sooner the better and saving all my money to retire early!

  • Sep 15

    Your manager doesn't really have your back or she would have used her influence to get you a benefited position! I would start looking elsewhere to other hospitals as you now have nursing experience. For some unknown reason you are being held back and it looks like you need to apply somewhere else. Benefits are important, the longer you let this continue the worse off you will be as it leaves you without health insurance, PTO and retirement benefits. Also being kept as RN I is detrimental to you when applying to other jobs. The sooner you get a new job the better off you will be! Don't wait any longer. Your manager is making excuses. I find it hard to believe your manager could not give you a benefited position if she really wanted to!

  • Sep 14

    Your manager doesn't really have your back or she would have used her influence to get you a benefited position! I would start looking elsewhere to other hospitals as you now have nursing experience. For some unknown reason you are being held back and it looks like you need to apply somewhere else. Benefits are important, the longer you let this continue the worse off you will be as it leaves you without health insurance, PTO and retirement benefits. Also being kept as RN I is detrimental to you when applying to other jobs. The sooner you get a new job the better off you will be! Don't wait any longer. Your manager is making excuses. I find it hard to believe your manager could not give you a benefited position if she really wanted to!

  • Sep 14

    Your manager doesn't really have your back or she would have used her influence to get you a benefited position! I would start looking elsewhere to other hospitals as you now have nursing experience. For some unknown reason you are being held back and it looks like you need to apply somewhere else. Benefits are important, the longer you let this continue the worse off you will be as it leaves you without health insurance, PTO and retirement benefits. Also being kept as RN I is detrimental to you when applying to other jobs. The sooner you get a new job the better off you will be! Don't wait any longer. Your manager is making excuses. I find it hard to believe your manager could not give you a benefited position if she really wanted to!

  • Sep 9

    Quote from Pixie.RN
    We do it for that small percentage of patients who come back and thank us later.

    I bought my husband a coffee mug with a quote that says "To the world you may be one person, but to one person you may be the world." I look at every code from the perspective that while it's just another patient to us, that patient might be someone's whole world. To give someone the gift of more time with their loved one is a precious thing. Quality time, that is; I agree that sometimes we code someone because their family cannot yet let go, though they probably should.
    I think you said it best!

  • Sep 9

    Wow that's a sticky spot to be in. I would be reluctant to share it with my current employer, but I don't know if there is a proper protocol and would they find out on their own if you didn't say anything.

    Seems like the BON sends quarterly newsletters that are little more than gossip rags, making sure the big red letter A is seen by all! What constructive purpose is that, other than to intimidate and ostracize the people on the list. I suppose it's meant as a warning, make sure you don't do something wrong and end up on the list or else!

  • Sep 9

    Quote from Pixie.RN
    We do it for that small percentage of patients who come back and thank us later.

    I bought my husband a coffee mug with a quote that says "To the world you may be one person, but to one person you may be the world." I look at every code from the perspective that while it's just another patient to us, that patient might be someone's whole world. To give someone the gift of more time with their loved one is a precious thing. Quality time, that is; I agree that sometimes we code someone because their family cannot yet let go, though they probably should.
    I think you said it best!

  • Sep 9

    Quote from Pixie.RN
    We do it for that small percentage of patients who come back and thank us later.

    I bought my husband a coffee mug with a quote that says "To the world you may be one person, but to one person you may be the world." I look at every code from the perspective that while it's just another patient to us, that patient might be someone's whole world. To give someone the gift of more time with their loved one is a precious thing. Quality time, that is; I agree that sometimes we code someone because their family cannot yet let go, though they probably should.
    I think you said it best!


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