Latest Comments by Transient

Transient 621 Views

Joined: Jan 18, '07; Posts: 17 (0% Liked)

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    Quote from dijaqrn
    Go to RN school!!!!!!!!!!!
    It took me almost 30 years of being an LVN before life allowed me back in school full time. Times a wasting..... Good luck!!!!!!
    I agree. Go straight to an RN program and this is coming from an LVN.

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    Any of you LVN's skipping the first semester of nursing for advancement placement in your school's nursing program? It would be nice to take the NCLEX and get that "RN" next to my last name, but I won't be able to claim I graduated from my local college's nursing program and I can only use my license in California.

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    Quote from meownsmile
    It could be part of it is your diet. But i think the first clue is psycing yourself out before you go to work. I dont know how long you have been at the present job but maybe its time for a change? I know i have to convince myself its going to be a decent day. Everyday before i go to work i make the comment "i dont want to work today". But by the time i get there and get into the routine, its fine. If you are staying negative maybe a department change or something might help.
    I like my job, but it's the NOC shift and some of my coworkers that's getting to me.

    It's time to transfer or quit.

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    Quote from hikernurse
    Does it happen during day shifts, too?
    I see where you're getting at. I'm actually chipper in the morning attending classes despite being "tired" working the NOC shift.

    I tried telling my manager that I wanted to go back to being per diem, but she needs me to work fulltime NOC. I actually never caused any kind of problems working the am and pm shift at my hospital. Maybe my last option is to quit or find another day shift job at another hospital. I better get my resume ready.

    :smilecoffeeIlovecof

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    Any of you nurses come to work just totally pissed off for no reason at all EVERYNIGHT?

    Just before my shift starts, I psyche myself up not to get pissed as soon as I get report, but 30 minutes into the shift, my blood pressure is already skyrocketing. It's gotten so bad that I take it out on my poor coworkers (I actually, genuinely, can't stand half of them) and I'm not even aware of my anger.

    God, it sucks to be me at night.

    The good news is, I'm trying to get help and I think it's time to change my lifestyle and get a physical check up as soon as possible. Hmmmm...maybe it's my diet messing with my mood.

    :smilecoffeeIlovecof

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    Why are classes such as history, chemistry, and math you've taken and passed counted overall in your school credit, but when it comes to microbiology, physiology, and anatomy....well, they have to have been taken within the past 7 years to get into the nursing program! To me, that's a bunch of bs! I'm sitting in my micro and physiology class this semester yawning my butt off because I've already taken these classes and passed all of them with grades of A's and a B. It's a complete waste of my time and students with my predicament. Regardless, I will pass Micro and Physiology, but I'd rather be in the nursing program doing clinicals rather than coloring a stupid physiology book on cell structure.

    As practicing LVN/LPN's, is there something we can do about this?

    :smilecoffeeIlovecof

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    I'm a warrior medic. I forbid myself to gain weight. I'm going to run 5 miles tomorrow.....hoooah!


    :smilecoffeeIlovecof

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    Most of the females I've dated or had relationships with have all worked in healthcare in one way or another.

    :smilecoffeeIlovecof

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    Quote from so_buggie
    I love microbiology. I hated regular biology but for some reason i love micrbiology. Maybe it's the teacher i have. Teachers can make all the difference if you have a good one. I think it's going to be a good course. Good luck to all of you. I hope you do well.
    Micro's fun when we're actually doing something in the lab. Yesterday, we got to play with the Proteus Mirabilis (causes UTI if you didn't know), Pseudomonas(common in plants I think), and Lactobacillus bacterias.

    My Physiology class? It's more like an art's and crafts class.

    :smilecoffeeIlovecof

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    Quote from NewEastCoastRN
    I work on a telemetry unit where I can have up to 5 patients at a time, all on monitors. We do not have anyone watching the monitors, we just check them when the alarm goes off. Never been a problem.
    You're lucky. Not a night goes by where I don't see Vtachs and some kind of blockages. I've had 2-3 tele patients die on my shift the past 1.5 years (Even had one go into PEA).

    :smilecoffeeIlovecof

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    Nurse fired after Iraq deployment sues Sutter Health



    http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cg...AG9ANNOT13.DTL

    Matthew B. Stannard, Chronicle Staff Writer
    Tuesday, January 23, 2007




    (01-23) 15:30 PST -- A military nurse who has served in combat zones for 30 years today sued her civilian employer, Sutter Health, alleging the company violated federal law by firing her after she told her supervisor she was being deployed to Iraq.


    The federal lawsuit, filed in San Francisco, accuses Sutter Health of violating the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act of 1994 -- USERRA -- by firing Debra Muhl, a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Air Force Reserve, in June 2006.
    Sutter Health spokeswoman Karen Garner said Tuesday that Muhl's termination was based on internal economics and not on her military service. She said that while Sutter regretted the timing of Muhl's termination notice -- two days after her notification of deployment -- the company followed procedures and went so far as to continue paying Muhl more than required by law during her final deployment after her termination.
    "We have a strong and generous military- and-disaster-leave policy that goes above and beyond what the law requires," she said.
    Muhl said she was given the same economic explanation when she was fired, but rejected it, as did her attorney, David Lowe of Rudy, Exelrod & Zieff in San Francisco.
    "Colonel Muhl is an honest-to-goodness war hero," Lowe said. "She has treated thousands of wounded individuals and service members ... We felt this was an important case that required intervention by the courts."
    Muhl, 56, said she worked at Sutter from 2002 to 2006, most recently as administrative director of the joint cardiac program. She was called up to active duty status several times during that period, including in March 2003 for 10 months and twice in 2005 for military training.
    In her complaint, Muhl alleges that her supervisor, Richard Gray, the cardiac program's medical director, found her deployments frustrating, at one point instructing her to file a complaint with Congress seeking to get out of the military. As a compromise, Muhl said, she requested a transfer to a unit with fewer deployments.
    Nevertheless, in late December 2005, she learned she would be going back to Iraq for several months. Gray was visibly angry by the news, Muhl said, and two days later called her into his office.
    "You had news for me on Tuesday, now I have news for you," Muhl recalled Gray saying. "You will not have a job when you return from the desert."


    E-mail Matthew Stannard at mstannard@sfchronicle.com.

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    Quote from stpauligirl
    Good luck with your scattered professor

    He claims to have made that mistake on the carbon because he was up the whole night watching infotelevision. What the heck?

    Another thing that irritates me about this teacher is that he uses thin red ink rather than black ink. Okay...how good is your vision way back of the class?

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    If you're already a CNA with your hospital, that's a big plus. You know where supplies are. You've met the staff and MD's. You're somewhat familiar with documentation and the patient charts. Most importantly, you've been at the bedside. You're good to go in my book. If I were you, I'd start shadowing the nurses. Learn to anticipate what the doctors might order if you get new admissions(you probably took the weights, did vitals, valuable's check didn't you?). What did the RN's do on those admissions? SOAP/Assessment and ordered the clerk to get SCD's and IV Pumps(MS floor). That RN probably called or faxed the Pharmacy department for newly ordered meds. Be well rounded and learn from non-nursing staff as well. You're unit clerk is probably a wealth of information on how your unit runs. When I was a CNA with Kaiser Permanente back in the 90s, I wasn't just a typical CNA. Back then, I drew blood, did EKG's, inserted foley's, prepared and sent deceased patients to the morgue (worked on an AIDS ward) and took my RN's blood sugars. I even became a hybrid nurses aide and monitor tech. spent time as a unit clerk as well. *lol* I remember working the swing shift as a unit clerk, and when they were short on CNA's for NOC, I volunteered for a double overtime and worked on the floor as a CNA (or if the telemetry pagers went down, I worked as monitor tech until the pagers were fixed).

    Those were the days at San Francisco's Kaiser Permanente.

    Now I'm just this burnt out healthcare worker who can't get along with his coworkers *lol*

    Sorry... Am I ranting and raving?

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    Quote from jamangel
    Don't you just hate that?
    Heck yeah!

    I've already taken Anatomy 3X (U.S. Army and my local community college), Physiology, and Microbiology with grades of "A" and "B". Just because I've taken them past 7 years ago, they won't accept them for nursing school. Now I'm taking them again and I'm just completely bored in class (except for my English class). It's funny, I've given the antibiotics used to kill the microbes my class will be studying this semester. I just get to refresh my mind again on why we need to kill spirochetes and abt resistant microbes.

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    What about monitor tech's ?

    I used to listen to my CD player back in the day on the NOC shift and I've never lost focus on my monitor screens. Heck, alot of them have portable DVD players.



    But yea, bedside nurses shouldn't have iPods. That's just plain stupidity. How are you going to hear that call light or worse: A confused patient attempting to get out of bed on his/her own.


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