Latest Comments by LadysSolo

Latest Comments by LadysSolo

LadysSolo 3,925 Views

Joined Dec 17, '06. Posts: 161 (71% Liked) Likes: 400

Sorted By Last Comment (Past 5 Years)
  • 0

    I would be a little careful, facilities tend to have the attitude that docs bring in money and nurses cost money. That being said, I have in the past worked with a cardiologist at a facility who said (and I quote) "Trained monkeys can do what nurses do." But he was a known rectal sphincter, and he NEVER got any unrequired assistance (word got around the hospital VERY quickly.)

  • 4
    nrsang97, totrn1, calivianya, and 1 other like this.

    At the hospital where I used to work, the day they got rid of all the LPNs, they sent management out to "assist." The RN who was in HR was assigned to my floor. I asked her to take a temp on a patient, and put another one on the bedpan. She DIDN'T KNOW HOW to take a temp, and said she didn't know where to get a bedpan?!?!?! So management take a shift?!?!? REALLY!!??? On what planet??????

  • 2
    LibraSunCNM and elkpark like this.

    I had a young man die on my floor (oncology) some years ago, his mom and wife took it hard. I had done some "extra" things for him from time to time (searching the hospital lounges/waiting areas for magazines he might be interested in, hunting other unit pantries for special snacks, etc.) They showed up on my doorstep the day after Christmas the year he died (I lived 30 miles from where I worked.) To say I was shocked would have been an understatement. I truly felt I had done nothing I wouldn't have done for any of my patients, but they wanted to hang onto me. I had to gently cut their cord, it was not good for them to hang onto me. I agree with keeping work and home separate.

  • 2
    Maevish and jeastridge like this.

    There is a lot of dissatisfaction with the hours that are put in - after seeing patients all day there are (average) 4 hours of documentation, so it's about a 12-14 hour day. Gets old after awhile.....

  • 5
    gypsyd8, loriangel14, heron, and 2 others like this.

    Heck, I knew opioids caused constipation when I was in Nursing school back in 1980. So how is this a new idea? Because some pharmaceutical companies want to market to opioids users "ask your doctor (sic - what about NPs/PAs?) for our great new med."

  • 5

    And I am an NP that will be going back to the bedside in a few years. Being an NP is great, don't get me wrong, but the hours are brutal and the documentation and nonsense with Medicare/Medicaid requirements for documentation (that have nothing to do with quality care) if you want paid are very burdensome. I am looking in a few years to go back to the floor so I can do my 8 hours and go home. Coming full circle....I want to have a life again .

  • 4
    nickster26, helen09, CdninTx, and 1 other like this.

    Or RoyHanson, are you a troll enjoying baiting people who actually know something about the topic?

  • 3
    helen09, RainMom, and CdninTx like this.

    RoyHanson, I am guessing you are a nursing student (or I( will cut you the slack of presuming you are.) Alzheimer's patients do not know they are confused (ask them what they are confused about - REALLY?) They are in their own world. My mom thought my sister's husband was her husband - she did not believe she was confused. Give her a choice? REALLY? She would have slept with my sister's husband! She tried to go into other people's houses she thought were hers and given a choice she would have done that. Have you ever experienced working with people with Alzheimers on a regular basis (or ever?) My grandmother tried to drive with her Alzheimer's. Should she have had that choice? That's what she wanted to do..... I have been a nurse longer than I care to admit, and lived through two family members dying of Alzheimer's. Walk in my shoes before you tell me to learn about the disease. I know more about it than I ever wanted to.

  • 1
    CdninTx likes this.

    It's a shame that your family was a bunch of jerks. The only saving grace for me was my brother and sister and I had sold everything to pay for my mom's care except some family jewelry that we divided among ourselves equally. We were civil, and still are. I have always felt sorry for families where some are greedy ***s.

  • 1
    jeastridge likes this.

    jrbl77, that is part of what we went through too. My sister wanted our mom close to her, which took her away from where she had lived all her life and all her friends and my brother and myself, to two hours away. As a healthcare provider, the nursing home was inadequate, but she was used to it, and I felt putting her in a new place would only worsen her confusion, so I settled for letting the DON know about specific things that I could not deal with and put up with the rest. I totally feel for you, as I have been where you are. The other part of it is the hereditary issue, as my grandmother had Alzheimer's and my mom also died of it, so I am (unfortunately) very aware of what my future is.

  • 1
    jeastridge likes this.

    Alzheimer's disease is particularly cruel because it steals the personality and mind of the person you knew for so many years. And it is more tragic because (at least in my mother's case) I could sometimes look into her eyes and see she was still there, but couldn't express herself, and other times "no one was home." Some decisions are easier (DNR, no feeding tube) as a nurse, but it can be hard if not everyone else agrees, but at least with the knowledge of the inevitable end of the disease process you can avoid the guilt. We can only hope for a cure someday.

  • 4
    kalycat, Loracs72, Kitiger, and 1 other like this.

    When my horse dislocated my thumb about two years ago, my orthopedic surgeon looked at me and said "You must have bones of iron, AT YOUR AGE most people break, not dislocate." ?!!?? He is only a couple years younger than I am! (I am 61 this year, and plan on working till I am 70.)

  • 7
    macawake, Farawyn, BNgurl, and 4 others like this.

    I have also had patients/family members who got their "medical degrees" from WebMD or the like, and those are who I believe the sign was aimed at. I believe it was an attempt at humor. I have no problem with patients/family discussing what they have read (in fact I encourage it) and educate about web sites (I tell them "Joe Blow on the corner can start a web site and say anything they like, so be sure it is a web site from a knowledgeable person or organization.") I can then (hopefully) refute wrong information and reinforce correct information. Just don't attack me with your WebMD degree please. If it was that easy we would not have to be licensed.

  • 1
    citylights89 likes this.

    If you have children and you want to see them, or are older, 8 hour shifts are the way to go, depending on where you work. When I worked in the hospital, I was scheduled for 5 8-hour shifts, but often was asked to stay over. I had an hour drive each way, so a 12-hour shift ended up being 14 1/2 hours. No time for a life that way! sleep and shower and back in! If there was a way to do it, I would love to work 4-10 hour shifts - the best of both worlds!

  • 5

    From one who was suicidal many years ago, it truly is a dark place, and you (or at least I) believe the world will be better off without you. I am now past that place, but the mind plays tricks on people, and the depression is like a deep hole that is EXTREMELY difficult to crawl out of (and I DO mean crawl, it is a very slow process.) Sometimes it is unsuccessful for people. We truly cannot save them all, we just do the best we can. But it is NEVER someone else's fault, it is within the person who does the act.


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