Latest Comments by LadysSolo

Latest Comments by LadysSolo

LadysSolo 4,094 Views

Joined Dec 17, '06. Posts: 166 (70% Liked) Likes: 409

Sorted By Last Comment (Past 5 Years)
  • 0

    I would rather get my work and charting done and leave on time than take my break and have a half hour over just to get my lunch break. I usually was over anyway, (oncology floor, not a night went by when I wasn't giving blood and/or chemotherapy to nearly every patient on the team (usually 6 to 7 patients per nurse with one STNA per floor.)

  • 2
    scthomas93 and learner1108 like this.

    I got lunch maybe 10 times in 23 years of work (5 8 hour shifts per week scheduled, often stretched to 10 or 12 hours to cover.) We were REQUIRED to clock out for 30 min, but very rarely got the lunch break. I often got to the end of my shift and was getting ready to go home (45 min drive) and remembered I had not peed all shift.

  • 0

    I do not discount what Jade said, although I DO agree that occasionally some take people home for all the right reasons. I had altogether too many families who refused all instruction on how to care for their loved ones, and some actually admitted that they would lose their place of residence if they did not take "mom" or "dad" home. And I had some admit that they did not work and needed the Social Security money to live on. Every case is different, I have a couple home visits now where the family refuses to do any care and calls VNS for every little thing.

  • 6

    Pt strongly encouraged to (insert whatever reasonable request here) in order to improve (whatever is going down the tubes.) States not interested (actually stated "H**L no!")
    Pt discovered with O2 sat in 70's when leaving bathroom without assistance, strong odor of tobacco smoke noted.
    Pt reinstructed on importance of following diet restrictions (due to DM II, pancreatitis, whatever.) Continues to have family bring in (insert fast food of choice here.)
    I could go on for days......

  • 1
    LadyFree28 likes this.

    Many positions have a "non-compete" clause where you are not permitted to take any similar position within a certain mile radius. That is something to check into before leaving a position and taking another. And while NPs (and PAs) should be able to handle most common conditions, even (heaven forbid) GPs ask colleagues about uncommon conditions they encounter, even though most pretend they "know everything."

  • 0

    I would be a little careful, facilities tend to have the attitude that docs bring in money and nurses cost money. That being said, I have in the past worked with a cardiologist at a facility who said (and I quote) "Trained monkeys can do what nurses do." But he was a known rectal sphincter, and he NEVER got any unrequired assistance (word got around the hospital VERY quickly.)

  • 4
    nrsang97, totrn1, calivianya, and 1 other like this.

    At the hospital where I used to work, the day they got rid of all the LPNs, they sent management out to "assist." The RN who was in HR was assigned to my floor. I asked her to take a temp on a patient, and put another one on the bedpan. She DIDN'T KNOW HOW to take a temp, and said she didn't know where to get a bedpan?!?!?! So management take a shift?!?!? REALLY!!??? On what planet??????

  • 2
    LibraSunCNM and elkpark like this.

    I had a young man die on my floor (oncology) some years ago, his mom and wife took it hard. I had done some "extra" things for him from time to time (searching the hospital lounges/waiting areas for magazines he might be interested in, hunting other unit pantries for special snacks, etc.) They showed up on my doorstep the day after Christmas the year he died (I lived 30 miles from where I worked.) To say I was shocked would have been an understatement. I truly felt I had done nothing I wouldn't have done for any of my patients, but they wanted to hang onto me. I had to gently cut their cord, it was not good for them to hang onto me. I agree with keeping work and home separate.

  • 2
    Maevish and jeastridge like this.

    There is a lot of dissatisfaction with the hours that are put in - after seeing patients all day there are (average) 4 hours of documentation, so it's about a 12-14 hour day. Gets old after awhile.....

  • 5
    gypsyd8, loriangel14, heron, and 2 others like this.

    Heck, I knew opioids caused constipation when I was in Nursing school back in 1980. So how is this a new idea? Because some pharmaceutical companies want to market to opioids users "ask your doctor (sic - what about NPs/PAs?) for our great new med."

  • 5

    And I am an NP that will be going back to the bedside in a few years. Being an NP is great, don't get me wrong, but the hours are brutal and the documentation and nonsense with Medicare/Medicaid requirements for documentation (that have nothing to do with quality care) if you want paid are very burdensome. I am looking in a few years to go back to the floor so I can do my 8 hours and go home. Coming full circle....I want to have a life again .

  • 4
    nickster26, helen09, CdninTx, and 1 other like this.

    Or RoyHanson, are you a troll enjoying baiting people who actually know something about the topic?

  • 3
    helen09, RainMom, and CdninTx like this.

    RoyHanson, I am guessing you are a nursing student (or I( will cut you the slack of presuming you are.) Alzheimer's patients do not know they are confused (ask them what they are confused about - REALLY?) They are in their own world. My mom thought my sister's husband was her husband - she did not believe she was confused. Give her a choice? REALLY? She would have slept with my sister's husband! She tried to go into other people's houses she thought were hers and given a choice she would have done that. Have you ever experienced working with people with Alzheimers on a regular basis (or ever?) My grandmother tried to drive with her Alzheimer's. Should she have had that choice? That's what she wanted to do..... I have been a nurse longer than I care to admit, and lived through two family members dying of Alzheimer's. Walk in my shoes before you tell me to learn about the disease. I know more about it than I ever wanted to.

  • 1
    CdninTx likes this.

    It's a shame that your family was a bunch of jerks. The only saving grace for me was my brother and sister and I had sold everything to pay for my mom's care except some family jewelry that we divided among ourselves equally. We were civil, and still are. I have always felt sorry for families where some are greedy ***s.

  • 1
    jeastridge likes this.

    jrbl77, that is part of what we went through too. My sister wanted our mom close to her, which took her away from where she had lived all her life and all her friends and my brother and myself, to two hours away. As a healthcare provider, the nursing home was inadequate, but she was used to it, and I felt putting her in a new place would only worsen her confusion, so I settled for letting the DON know about specific things that I could not deal with and put up with the rest. I totally feel for you, as I have been where you are. The other part of it is the hereditary issue, as my grandmother had Alzheimer's and my mom also died of it, so I am (unfortunately) very aware of what my future is.


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