Latest Comments by LadysSolo

LadysSolo 5,304 Views

Joined Dec 17, '06. Posts: 245 (71% Liked) Likes: 642

Sorted By Last Comment (Max 500)
  • 0

    I think sometimes it is recommended the person NOT talk about it so the Board of Nursing can't subpoena people to testify against the nurse in question. I would talk about it after the fact, especially if it wasn't true. Patients and their families can be VERY vindictive!

  • 0

    My allergic reaction was widespread localized, my entire arm becomes flaming red. After the second bad reaction to the TB test, the ID MD where I worked said "no more," I was at risk of anaphylaxis the next time. And after the flu vaccine did the same thing, he said "no more" to that one too, said too high a risk of anaphylaxis with the next one. He said it might not be the next one, but it might be and not worth the risk. He was the only one who could stop the annual TB test. So they did "signs and symptoms" in employee health because annual chest x-rays are also a bad idea.

  • 0

    Interesting - if your employer provides your medical insurance, they would NOT be allowed to release the information to the public due to privacy policies, so they would be in violation......Huh! I wonder if their counsel has been made aware of the risks of the "mask or vaccinate" policy....

  • 5
    Maritimer, gardenia1, canoehead, and 2 others like this.

    7SGBRN, I totally agree. I would be MUCH more agreeable to wearing a mask if all visitors either had to have the vaccine or mask. And all MDs have to have the vaccine or wear a mask too! (Let's see if THAT flies!)

  • 4
    dishes, RobbiRN, NRSKarenRN, and 1 other like this.

    You have to explain things in "people language," not "medical speak." I explain things to patients in "people language" as much as I can, and they seem to appreciate it. Example to a patient about to have an angioplasty - "it's kind of like snaking your drain to remove a clog." They get the picture and aren't afraid. Or doing wound care on a large wound using collagen to a construction worker - Asked if he used scaffolding, he said yes, and told him the collagen was like scaffolding for his tissue to grow onto. He got it. When you explain it in their world, it makes things better.

  • 10

    I cannot get a flu vaccine due to allergy to the preservatives used (same problem with annual TB test - in fact it was apparently the TB test that sensitized me.) But I have a larger problem with mandating - the efficacy of the flu vaccine varies wildly year to year. In the nursing homes I go to in my practice, this year nearly every resident got the vaccine, and IMHO efficacy (due to the number of residents with the flu) is 10% or less. If it was regularly 80-90% effective as most other vaccines are, my opinion would be different. And no, I won't mask. And for those who will say too small a sample - I am in 14 - 20 nursing homes weekly. That's a lot of residents.

  • 0

    NE Ohio.

  • 1
    AnnoyedNurse likes this.

    nuguynurse2b, are you kidding me? I realize it depends on where you live, but as an NP on salary, I average $35.00/hr when I do the math. I have NEVER made $40/hr., and I have a master's degree with 35 years experience (23 as an RN, 12 as an NP.)

  • 1
    AnnoyedNurse likes this.

    And I have had patients refuse to have their treatments done, and then report that "no one does my treatments!" trying to get the nurses in trouble. I have personally had patients that would allow me to do their foot dressings and then refuse their buttocks dressings. I have also had patients remove their dressings within hours of my doing them (and these people are A & O x 3.) You can never be sure the patient does not have a personal agenda (like secondary gains - attention from others.)

  • 3
    Mellah430, jeastridge, and Cat365 like this.

    Been there, did that. Jut remember, none of us are perfect parents, we all just do the best we can. And seeing your parents work helps kids to realize that school is THEIR job and they have to do their best at school (again, not perfect, just doing the best they can.) And a perfectly clean house is NOT a priority, anything clean enough that you don't get a disease is clean enough.

  • 1
    Carol Ebert likes this.

    I am 61 years old now, plan to stay full-time until 64 or 65, and then to do part-time until age 70 (kind of ease into retirement.) I have been full-time since age 16, and in one of my previous jobs I saw many people who had done factory work starting at age 18 quit as soon as they had their 30 years in and they were dead of an MI within two years. My mom quit completely as soon as she could, and was in the throes of Alzheimer's disease within 3 years. So I figure easing into it is the best way. So health continuing as it is, that's the plan..... I have so many hobbies and interests that my friends say Alzheimer's disease has no chance!

  • 3

    Ruby, thank you for saying what I was thinking to the OP - these are RARELY totally one person's fault. Usually it is a systems error, or there is more than one person involved but one person usually ends up feeling responsible. It may help to think of all the places that the cascade of events could have been stopped, had this or that happened, to lessen the self-blame. And I agree with counseling, to help put the event in perspective and help you to move on.

  • 2

    One word answer - NO!!! Longer answer - We just received a corporate letter basically informing us that others have it worse. Makes you feel good that your employer strives to stay just above the bottom in how you are treated, doesn't it? Never strive to treat your people the best, strive to stay just above the pit.......retirement can't come soon enough......

  • 2
    beckysue920 and quazar like this.

    I am told by my employer that I document too much. Having had to give a deposition once, I now document so any attorney looks at my documentation and decides it is not worth it to sue me. I will NOT shorten what I believe is necessary documentation (I also want to be able to look at my notes if I ever AM sued and be able to remember who it was.)

  • 1
    Davey Do likes this.

    What several have said is correct - she was going to go septic before you got the x-ray, it was already in progress. An hour or two earlier on the antibiotic was not going to change the inevitable. The fragile elderly can change in a heartbeat, and can crash quickly, their bodies can hide what is going on pretty well. Hang in there, you did fine.


close