Latest Comments by LadysSolo

LadysSolo 5,487 Views

Joined Dec 17, '06. Posts: 250 (72% Liked) Likes: 680

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    kalycat, RainMom, TriciaJ, and 7 others like this.

    2mint, ADN, RN, the OP did state that she contacted the instructor, the instructor was the one who said that "Alice" was to be"lead" with the OP as back-up. I will reiterate again, as a nursing instructor for the last 10 years, ALL of my students in their preceptorship/capstone (whatever the program calls it) are expected to seek out all the experiences the law allows them to have, as this is their last/best chance to get experience with maximum back-up. The students go in being totally aware of this, and any of mine who would have acted like this person would have failed and had to repeat their preceptorship. I want capable students coming out of our program that are sought as new hires in this area, and I AM proud of my former students I see working when I am doing my other job as an NP. Do I expect a lot of them - YES! But so does the job (when they get one.) I do NOT want them coming out of the program thinking hiding and putting their work off on others is the way to do things (although had one of mine acted like this earlier in the program as I suspect "Alice" has, she would not have made it this far.) I "hunt down" my students if they are not readily visible.

  • 8

    As a nursing instructor, I expect my students to SEEK OUT experiences during clinicals, and ESPECIALLY during preceptorship. If she is hiding and not trying, I would expect you to notify me (you say you notified her program so done,) they should have talked to her (I would have,) and then if she doesn't improve I would expect you to fail her and give detailed reasons why. And at least in the program I teach in, she would just have to repeat preceptorship, and then she could graduate in the next semester (if she improves.)

  • 4

    Amethya and brownbook, I worked oncology for 23 years, cancer definitely has a smell, just like Pseudomonas and C.diff. They are all different smells, very distinctive. I could often tell if someone had cancer before the actual path report came back. Not a skill I wanted, and not 100% but pretty close. Sometimes if it was a very small tumor I couldn't smell it, but with lung cancer and colon cancer and breast cancer I was usually about 100%.

    And as a part-time nursing instructor, when I have students clinical, I will always explain that there are ideal ways to do things and there are what you do if you want to go home at a reasonable hour. I explain that the book way is NOT always the practical way.

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    TheAtomicStig_702 likes this.

    What I did that helped was take my calendar and syllabus the first day and mark down when all the tests and projects were due, so I could stay organized (I worked full time while in school.) There were some instructors that were better and some were less helpful. I now teach part-time in an LPN program, I am a tutor and clinical instructor, and substitute classroom instructor (cannot do that full time because I also have a full time job.) I try to help our students pass, but I do not give out easy points, because they will have people's lives in their hands and I want them to be as capable as possible. After all, they may be taking care of ME someday! Stay organized, and do your best, and I agree quit thinking "doom and gloom" or it will become a self-fulfilling prophesy!

  • 7

    I have a friend with a permanent trach, he is not on oxygen (he is also not a health care worker,) and he just wears a bib over the trach stoma to keep debris out. So I think a bit more information is needed about what the nurse-to-be will require - oxygen or not, ventilator or not, suctioning or not, etc.

  • 0

    I think sometimes it is recommended the person NOT talk about it so the Board of Nursing can't subpoena people to testify against the nurse in question. I would talk about it after the fact, especially if it wasn't true. Patients and their families can be VERY vindictive!

  • 0

    My allergic reaction was widespread localized, my entire arm becomes flaming red. After the second bad reaction to the TB test, the ID MD where I worked said "no more," I was at risk of anaphylaxis the next time. And after the flu vaccine did the same thing, he said "no more" to that one too, said too high a risk of anaphylaxis with the next one. He said it might not be the next one, but it might be and not worth the risk. He was the only one who could stop the annual TB test. So they did "signs and symptoms" in employee health because annual chest x-rays are also a bad idea.

  • 0

    Interesting - if your employer provides your medical insurance, they would NOT be allowed to release the information to the public due to privacy policies, so they would be in violation......Huh! I wonder if their counsel has been made aware of the risks of the "mask or vaccinate" policy....

  • 5
    Maritimer, gardenia1, canoehead, and 2 others like this.

    7SGBRN, I totally agree. I would be MUCH more agreeable to wearing a mask if all visitors either had to have the vaccine or mask. And all MDs have to have the vaccine or wear a mask too! (Let's see if THAT flies!)

  • 4
    dishes, RobbiRN, NRSKarenRN, and 1 other like this.

    You have to explain things in "people language," not "medical speak." I explain things to patients in "people language" as much as I can, and they seem to appreciate it. Example to a patient about to have an angioplasty - "it's kind of like snaking your drain to remove a clog." They get the picture and aren't afraid. Or doing wound care on a large wound using collagen to a construction worker - Asked if he used scaffolding, he said yes, and told him the collagen was like scaffolding for his tissue to grow onto. He got it. When you explain it in their world, it makes things better.

  • 10

    I cannot get a flu vaccine due to allergy to the preservatives used (same problem with annual TB test - in fact it was apparently the TB test that sensitized me.) But I have a larger problem with mandating - the efficacy of the flu vaccine varies wildly year to year. In the nursing homes I go to in my practice, this year nearly every resident got the vaccine, and IMHO efficacy (due to the number of residents with the flu) is 10% or less. If it was regularly 80-90% effective as most other vaccines are, my opinion would be different. And no, I won't mask. And for those who will say too small a sample - I am in 14 - 20 nursing homes weekly. That's a lot of residents.

  • 0

    NE Ohio.

  • 1
    AnnoyedNurse likes this.

    nuguynurse2b, are you kidding me? I realize it depends on where you live, but as an NP on salary, I average $35.00/hr when I do the math. I have NEVER made $40/hr., and I have a master's degree with 35 years experience (23 as an RN, 12 as an NP.)

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    AnnoyedNurse likes this.

    And I have had patients refuse to have their treatments done, and then report that "no one does my treatments!" trying to get the nurses in trouble. I have personally had patients that would allow me to do their foot dressings and then refuse their buttocks dressings. I have also had patients remove their dressings within hours of my doing them (and these people are A & O x 3.) You can never be sure the patient does not have a personal agenda (like secondary gains - attention from others.)


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