Latest Comments by LadysSolo

Latest Comments by LadysSolo

LadysSolo 4,250 Views

Joined Dec 17, '06. Posts: 179 (71% Liked) Likes: 443

Sorted By Last Comment (Past 5 Years)
  • 2

    My heterosexual grandmother had a "significant other" after my grandfather died (also male) that she did not marry because she would have lost significant social security benefits, so older people need asked too. I ask "are you sexually active?" "Are you both monogamous, or use protection?" "Have you been tested for STDs?" And I assume nothing about the gender of the partner. I will ask if I feel it is pertinent, such as if a STD is found, and we may need to discuss notification of the partner, and others if the partner is not (or may not be) monogamous.

  • 1
    Jules A likes this.

    I have taken call while on vacation, I took a call at my mother's funeral (I had to step out of the service to take it,) Christmas day, and no, we are not compensated well (I have had one raise in 6 years.) If a call comes while I am asleep and do not hear it, I answer as soon as I get the call. I will admit, my nursing homes try not to call me when I am on vacation or when they know I have plans (I try to keep them aware, as I have covered the same facilities for the 6 years, and we respect each other.)

  • 4

    At my company we are on call 24/7/365 unless we make arrangements for otherwise. But we knew that going in, and we are salary. When I calculate what I make per hour, it is less than most LPNS at the LTC facilities I cover. No, NPs do not have "cake" jobs.

  • 2
    kmsussman and Orphan RN like this.

    I am very sympathetic - I have two home care patients that use a home physician service that recently stopped their pain medications and told them to go to pain management. One is 750+ pounds and the other is 350+ pounds, both minimally ambulatory (hence need of home visits.) How are they to GET to pain management? What are these people to do? No one wants the responsibility any more.

  • 3

    Spiker, I am so sorry you had to make that decision, I can't imagine how hard it was, but you made it out of love for your daughter. (((hugs)))

  • 4

    I had "the discussion" with my son when my mom died, about me being a DNRCCA, he was not happy but he knows. I also asked him what HE wanted done should something happen (God forbid, as I cannot imagine losing my son, but he could be in a car accident, etc.) He told me he did not want to be kept going on machines, and to let him go. I just hope if it is ever necessary that I have the strength to carry out his wishes, but it DOES help to know what he wants done.

  • 1
    BeenThere2012 likes this.

    I absolutely NEVER questioned whether we did the "right thing" for my mother, as we followed what she expressed her wishes to happen. My mother died of Alzheimer's disease, and she had many years before expressed that she wanted to be a DNRCCA, and that is what we did. She NEVER wanted a feeding tube, and we honored that. She had "no heroics," and died peacefully. No regrets, and I have told my son the same thing - NO HEROICS, and NO GUILT - it is what I want to happen.

  • 0

    I know of two, one who had family/friends bringing in illegal drugs which the person was taking, and the other was after the police had to be called several times for the person threatening others (in neither case was the person asked to leave mentally challenged - both were "alert and oriented x 4.") In both cases the nursing homes had to ensure the safety of the other residents.

  • 0

    Be grateful for the people helped by the donation (so many are waiting for organs) and be thankful the family agreed rather than keeping the patient on long-term "life support."

  • 2
    LadyFree28 and Kitiger like this.

    I have a home care client who gave me a few Christmas cookies, I did not consider this crossing a professional boundary. I WOULD consider an expensive gift a problem. I based this on policies from when I worked in the hospital - food gifts and flowers were okay, everything else was forbidden (food and flowers were considered okay because others could enjoy them too.)

  • 5

    The problem I encountered when I was a floor nurse was that DESPITE a patient's signed Living Will, when the patient became unresponsive and the MPOA disagreed and "wanted everything done" (Living Will stated DNRCC), the provider inevitably would go with the MPOA "because the patient can't sue me after they have died and the family can." Some providers need a spinal transplant.

  • 0

    Could you (for home use) get a vial and syringes and have a few doses pre-drawn up like we do in home care for diabetics without the dexterity to draw up their own? Could provide peace of mind.....

  • 0

    I would rather get my work and charting done and leave on time than take my break and have a half hour over just to get my lunch break. I usually was over anyway, (oncology floor, not a night went by when I wasn't giving blood and/or chemotherapy to nearly every patient on the team (usually 6 to 7 patients per nurse with one STNA per floor.)

  • 2
    scthomas93 and learner1108 like this.

    I got lunch maybe 10 times in 23 years of work (5 8 hour shifts per week scheduled, often stretched to 10 or 12 hours to cover.) We were REQUIRED to clock out for 30 min, but very rarely got the lunch break. I often got to the end of my shift and was getting ready to go home (45 min drive) and remembered I had not peed all shift.

  • 0

    I do not discount what Jade said, although I DO agree that occasionally some take people home for all the right reasons. I had altogether too many families who refused all instruction on how to care for their loved ones, and some actually admitted that they would lose their place of residence if they did not take "mom" or "dad" home. And I had some admit that they did not work and needed the Social Security money to live on. Every case is different, I have a couple home visits now where the family refuses to do any care and calls VNS for every little thing.


close
close