Latest Comments by LadysSolo

LadysSolo 6,082 Views

Joined Dec 17, '06. Posts: 291 (70% Liked) Likes: 789

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  • 3

    Depends on where you are, in the Midwest (where I am) I have 12 years' experience as an NP and just last year got a raise to $85,000/year. We get 4 weeks vacation and 1/2 credit for insurance (medical/dental.) But we are also on call 24/7/365 unless we leave the country, then someone else takes your call. Yes it sucks, but to make more money I would either have to move or drive 2 hours one way. I love my home and it's nearly paid off, so I deal with it. No job is perfect (so I tell my students -I also teach part-time,) you just decide what you are willing to put up with.

  • 1
    kiszi likes this.

    Well, the brick and mortar program I went to discouraged us from working while getting our MSN in preparation for our certification as NPs, but since I object to my family becoming homeless and not having any food to eat, I was unable to totally immerse myself in my education and had to also work full time. But I also graduated with a very high GPA, and passed boards on my first try, so I did okay. Btw, I share the OP's concerns about some of the on-line programs. And I totally disagree about the DNP being entry-level for NPs. There is only so much of the theorists I can stomach. Maybe if it was all practical, okay, but we all know it wouldn't be.

  • 6
    brownbook, Orca, beckysue920, and 3 others like this.

    Never never have a relationship with a former patient. If they initiate contact, say "Hi" and move on ASAP. I would NEVER have had drinks with a former patient, especially since they may become your patient again.

  • 1
    OrganizedChaos likes this.

    When I started nursing school in 1979 (diploma program) it was supposed to come to pass that BSN would be the entry level for RN. Still not the case in 2017! And LPNs are supposed to be "phased out" - do you know any nursing home that could afford and all RN staff??? Or PCP office???? Not going to happen.

  • 0

    I agree that non-union can be okay, (I worked for 23 years at a non-union hospital) but whenever they started making unfair policies we would make noises like we were thinking about unionizing. It worked very well to keep management "in line." (Example: When they started making all positions posted in the hospital part-time and then making us work extra so they could have the benefit of full-time employees without paying any benefits. We made BIG union noise, and the next week full-time positions were posted again.) So it can be okay but be careful, ask around about policies, employee treatment, etc.

  • 0

    I actually like the questions - The LGBTQ population that is out is aging, and will be needing more care. There will need to be awareness that spouses/significant others may not be the opposite gender.

  • 0

    Responsibility without authority is all too common in middle management. You are expected to get results with your hands tied behind your back. Altogether too much fun (not.)

  • 3

    I don't know about the rest of you, but I (at age 62) still regularly read (several articles/week) practice updates, new drug updates, new guidelines, etc. I feel I keep up to date on new things, and don't forsee that changing anytime soon. I believe I owe my patients this.

  • 1
    traumaRUs likes this.

    Full time as an NP until 65, then part-time (4 days/week) at one of my nursing homes (unless something drastically changes with the company I am currently with, if it does I will stay on,) then per diem at age 70. I currently teach part-time also, and I will keep doing that (1-2 clinicals/month, and substitute in the classroom as needed and able to around my schedule.)

  • 0

    Adult NP working for a private practice.

  • 0

    There is not a work-life balance as an NP, at least in my experience. In the company I work for we are on-call 24/7/365, and in addition to the hours spent seeing patients, I add another 20-30 hours/week charting, depending on complexity of the patient. All for no more money. This is why in about 3 years I am going back to the bedside, I want to have a life and work my 8 hours and go home.

  • 0

    In NE Ohio, most new grad NPs make about $20,000 more than an experienced hospital RN. That was about what I made when I first started as an NP, and am currently making about $80,000/year with 12 years' experience as an NP and 23 years as an RN prior to becoming an NP (35 years total experience in nursing.) Yes NE Ohio doesn't pay well compared to other areas of the country. YMMV.

  • 0

    Go to the state board of nursing web site, they should have it listed somewhere on the site (I know where it is in my state, but it may be in different areas in different states.

  • 4
    JustMe54, mdcRN2011, bbcewalters, and 1 other like this.

    I would not do it. Psych meds are too tricky to prescribe, adjust, and monitor without additional education and I would not want to try to defend myself without psych certification if I made a mistake.

  • 1
    GdBSN likes this.

    Being a nurse comes with a soft heart.


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