Content That LadysSolo Likes

Content That LadysSolo Likes

LadysSolo 4,451 Views

Joined Dec 17, '06. Posts: 200 (71% Liked) Likes: 512

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  • Aug 27

    Quote from quazar
    It's stories like this that push me closer and closer to the edge of leaving nursing altogether. I'm so glad you kept your license and it was resolved.
    Me too. I've never had any actions or complaints against my license, nor any legal troubles of any kind, but if all it takes is one person to set things in motion like this...well, then, we are each and every one of us living in a sand castle.

    That is no way to live.

  • Aug 27

    Quote from BeenThere2012
    Thank you so much for the information. Unfortunately, I already accepted the BRN's charges as my lawyer told.me it would.cost upwards of $40,000 to go to a hearing and he didn't think we would win. He said the BRN in my state "often" rejects the judges decision , and they are allowed to do that based upon non binding arbitration. I made an error in a med administration, but they based the severity of charges saying I didn't have the 2nd RN present at the time. I DID. She was watching me. She stated I didn't call her into the room to do the procedure. No I didn't "call" her into the room because She came into my room at the pre-designated time as PLANNED and walked with me to the pump etc...there is.even more detail here. Too long for this post....
    I re-read my response to your post, and realize this sounds very vague. Obviously, there is more to the story and I am farther down the road than simply being charged....I have so many questions and concerns about the way our BRN/BONs function. I obtained my lawyer as soon as I knew I was being reported. I had the VP of our union helping before that. I did all I could to bring the truth and details of the whole incident to light. I fully cooperated with the hospital (not sure that was entirely the best decision), my manager (Department manager) was fully behind me and supported me the best way she could under the circumstances and with the constraints she was also under. The whole process took approximately 3 years. I question if I had a good lawyer or if in fact, there really wasn't more that could have been done in my defense.

    It truly was an honest error. I am NOT a careless, irresponsible nurse or employee for that matter. I follow policies, report concerns and errors I find as we are told to do. I come in extra and work OT when needed. I have sat on committees and was actually recruited to serve on a house-wide committee to develop Nursing Shared Governance for the hospital. I am honest and law abiding. Never even had a poor evaluation in all my years of practice. After the event, I was continuing to be a preceptor to new grads, mentor for new hires, etc. If I was such a poor nurse, why would they continue to have me in those roles for the remainder of the 2 years I continued to work there? I resigned because my family was relocating to another city.

    Throughout the investigation process I never had a clue as to which way this was going to be spun. All I could do throughout the whole process was tell the truth, answer all questions, and comply with requests from the BRN investigator. At the time of the incident, even the parents were very concerned about me...seemingly more so than even for their son as they knew he suffered no ill effects, and I had been caring for him for a few weeks at that point. They trusted me and understood what happened as full disclosure was given. At no point did it appear that the family would file charges.

    The whole thing has turned into a nightmare worse than I ever would have suspected. Going through the process was the most stressful, anxiety producing and painful thing I have ever experienced, second only to loosing a loved one. And that was all I expected it to be. I knew there quite possibly would be some form of reprimand or "price" to pay, but never suspected to the degree that eventually occurred. It has all but ruined my life as I knew it. We have now gone through all of our savings, sold a car, sold belongings, cut back on everything possible to cut back on, etc., since I have been out of work for almost a year. I haven't yet found anyone able to hire me with my license under probation. I have had many interviews, and several offers only to have them rescinded once it reaches the corporate level. I had one that went all the way through all those, only to be rejected by the BRN....wouldn't give permission for me to have that position because there would have been a few hours in home care as part of the position, unsupervised. I started applying for other types of jobs but because I have done nothing else for 34 years, they are all minimum wage positions.

    As I have said in other posts on this site when the subject comes up, I absolutely will not allow this to be just about me. I have felt from the beginning that something must be done to change the way our BRNs function. At this point in time, I have no idea what form that will take. I dont know where to begin. However, if it takes me to my deathbed, ​I will participate somehow, some way to effect change.

  • Aug 24

    Quote from Ruby Vee
    I've found that a little sarcasm or a little humor works with these sort of folks. The thing is, I can't plan it -- it just sort of pops out.

    There was a renal attending who had a reputation for being nasty, and we all used to dread renal consults in the CCU. One morning he showed up at 7:07am (after the consult was placed at 7:01) and started yelling (raised voice, offensive language) about the fact that I didn't have an hour's worth of urine collected for him. "It's been six minutes," I said. He continued to rant about the fluid orders, labs that hadn't been sent (because they hadn't been ordered) and various and sundry other issues. Finally I snapped.

    "I'm SURE Dr. Smith ordered this consult to ruin both of our days."

    "Oh," he said, taken aback. "Right. I'm sorry."

    And I never EVER had another problem with him being nasty to me.
    It's petty, but it was SO SO satisfying the day that a notoriously nasty specialist called and started yelling at me about half a dozen things he'd ordered on the last shift that hadn't been done. I told him they hadn't been ordered, and he said he d*** well had, insulted my competence, and then hung up on me. He came roaring on to the floor a little while later, enraged, and I (having had a moment to look through the lengthy chart) was able to point out to him that the reason his "orders" hadn't been completed was that neither secretaries nor nurses are in the habit of looking for new orders written on the progress notes from last week.

    He didn't have a good response for that.

  • Aug 22

    Quote from jetsy62
    Wish people would stay on this topic. Everyone has different experiences and just because you may not have had that experience, it does not mean others have not. That being said, what is the appropriate answer? For the sake of discussion, let's say you have a healthy 24 year old that does not have anything showing they wish to be an organ donor. In my state this can be designated on the drivers license. The family says they never expressed a wish to be an organ donor. For whatever reason (pick one, religious, past experience, just don't want to) the family states they don't want their family member to donate organs. Per hospital protocol, the phone call is made that there could be a possibility for viable organs. That conversation happens and the family says no. What is the accepted practice thereafter? No more asking, asking one more time, sending in another person. I am wondering if this varies by state, by institution, etc.

    This is just my opinion, ethically, it would be wrong to not accept the family's initial decision and second.


    I really think during people's annual physical exams or even health insurance companies should mandate answering the question like in a packet, provide numbers to these organ procurement org. for further questions/information.

    I'm sure people's wishes to donate or not to, will be respected. No ethical committees would need to address the topic and no need to burden the family during the grieving process. Everything is already set.

  • Aug 22

    Quote from Asystole RN

    Boo hoo.

    Who cares about someone's feelings when LIVES are on the line? The pursuit of organ donation should be aggressive and persistent. We owe that much to those who are dying and to the families to know what their feelings may cost.

    Organ donation is serious and should be treated as such, their tears will dry but dead is forever. Maybe their loved one's death will mean that others may live.

    Feelings v. Life
    your crude and rude response is part of the problem. i am thinking you may have lost a loved one that did not get that transplant in time, if so, you neutrality is shot.
    No, is NO. the end.

  • Aug 21

    Quote from Dany102
    roser13,

    Yes, let's. In what way is it questionable - let alone criminal - to alert someone of the possibility that their rights have been ignored and validate their (initial) feelings that something wasn't quite right? I was not aware you needed to be professionally trained to determine if it's okay to walk in unsolicited and unwanted when using the bathroom. Silly me, I thought it was common sense. I guess I learned that lesson.

    Read back the original poster's situation, then my first and second reply. You will find I do not disagree, at least not on the principle of things. I suggested a more appropriate, less intrusive, way to check on a patient.

    In any event, it seems the original poster provided more information which clarify a lot more of the situation. It appears he is happy with the answers he was given and is closing the case. I'm happy to follow suite.

    Dany
    Ok, then. You are not a nurse. You are not even a pretend nursing student.

    You are just a weird person fixated on a nursing forum.

    You should be very, very careful as to your tendency to give advice in situations in which you are clueless. There are laws regarding the designation/title of nurse. How will you know when you have crossed the law into illegal representation? Answer: you won't.

    If you have any self awareness left, you will cease & desist as of now.

  • Aug 21

    Patients are sometimes found unconscious, on the floor of the bathroom, bleeding from their heads. People often say they're going to call for help before attempting to ambulate, then do not. Falls are a HUGE deal and it is ALWAYS the nurse's fault ...even when it's not.
    Yes, you deserved more consideration, but I understand why you did not get it.

  • Aug 21

    Quote from Spidey's mom
    Agreed - we have to call Donor Network regardless of Advanced Directives or a will or any statement the patient does not want to donate.
    Which to me is wrong, wrong, wrong. If the patient has made it clear that s/he doesn't want to be a donor, then that's that. It's really none of their business if that patient has died/is dying.

  • Aug 21

    Quote from benwade
    Your casual dismissal of his concerns reminds me of white people casually dismissing black people's experience of racism. Of course sexual identity doesn't affect YOU, you are the majority.
    And white males are the most privileged species on our planet.

    As women, we experience far more sexism than men; even men in nursing.

  • Aug 20

    Dude I would forget those stereotypes, male nurses are like any other group of guys. I'm a nurse, happily married for four years, and prior to that had several girlfriends, went on a whole bunch of dates and no woman ever gave it a second thought. In fact my wife thinks it's kind of cool that I help people heal and that I have medical knowledge. And besides, your career has nothing to do with your gender anyway. My dad was a nurse for years, I knew early on that I wanted to be a nurse, and the fact that I'm a guy has always been totally irrelevant. Nursing has been a challenging, rewarding profession, and I chose it over medicine because I like doing more hands on care, I like the flexibility to work any kind of schedule I want and to work in all different areas rather than specialize in one thing and stay there.

  • Aug 20

    Quote from roser13
    Anyone who doesn't view those questions as inappropriate might need to examine their critical thinking skills.
    On the contrary. I understand exactly where you're coming from with the exact words and questions that OP used. I am interpreting the questions a little differently based on the impression that OP communicated his meaning poorly, because human beings often say words that convey a message a little different from what they intended to say. He didn't say anything about being attracted to patients, but to women. If what he really meant was along the lines of "Do you get hot under the collar when a male nurse takes care of you as a patient?" then yes, that's really frickin disgusting. If he meant "Would women in general find a man who is a nurse attractive?" that's an innocent question. OP hasn't come back to clarify, so I'm not going to bother thinking it over any harder because my interpretation of his words doesn't change anything.

    Communication is complicated, and multiple people with equally strong critical thinking skills can each interpret a statement differently.

  • Aug 17

    Quote from Spidey's mom
    Wow, the timing of this thread is shocking!

    I'm in California as well and I work hospice. For our hospice patients in SNF, when they die, we have to call that 1-800 number. I've been doing it for years but recently it has gotten more difficult to deal with them. Even if you say the family has said no, they continue to ask you questions that take about 20 minutes to ascertain if the patient would be a candidate.

    I had a patient die a couple of days ago. Uterine cancer with mets everywhere. She had a large open necrotic coccyx wound. When she died, I called her family and then started the paperwork as I called the Donor Network. I told the rep the family said no and again, had to answer all the questions. Very detailed, H&P, labs, X-rays, MRI, CT scans, etc.

    The rep said the patient qualified for skin donation. I told her the family had already said no to donation - the legal rep of the family. I was told that another specially trained person would be calling back in an hour to talk with the family about donation and I should not talk to the family about the upcoming phone call or anything about donation.

    I was appalled. So, OP . . . I totally get your point.

    And I am in favor of donation.

    But this new way to change people's minds reminds me of Mortuaries and how they prey on the grieving families in order to get them to purchase more expensive caskets.

    "Predatory" and "unethical" indeed.

    I'm still fuming about it . . .
    That is disgusting. They sound like vultures, trying to scavenge any last scrap from a body. And I'm with you...I don't like the idea of browbeating grief-stricken families.

  • Aug 17

    I agree with you OP. If it was my family member and I'd already said no, I better not see or hear anything else about it. Leave alone in peace to grieve.

  • Aug 17

    Quote from Spidey's mom
    Wow, I didn't interpret the OP's original post the same at all. Amazing how we all see things differently.

    I was surprised by the timing of the post because I had a recent negative experience with the donor network here in California.

    The OP has some good points and a scattered few posters have agreed that some of the donor networks' tactics are troubling.

    Again, I am in favor of donation.
    This is not about if organ donation is right or wrong, it's about the certain practices.

    I've seen it. I didn't see all organ reps do it. But, the times I did see, I felt the family was being rushed.


    I had a overdose young girl in her early 20's. I know, pristine organs for donating, right? And, she was, didn't require vasopressors, just brain dead and vent. Her parents lived over seas, 15 hour flight to come to California.


    The parents came 3 days later after the event. The day the parents arrived, the organ donation people were already on them. I think they only talk to her 3 times, this time. Twice in conference and once at bedside.

    The mom didn't even have a day with her daughter without organ procurement asking for them and taking her. I think she only had 4 hours before they assumed care.

    As nurse's sometimes you can tell people's emotions, when we were getting her daughter ready to go to OR. I don't think the death settled in yet with the mom. She had a dazed look on her face.

    I felt sorry the mom, I felt this time, when things didn't need to happen fast, they could've thought of the patient's family. No one seems to ever think of the the donor's family during the process of them agreeing to donate.

  • Aug 17

    Quote from dangerous1
    I have actually, 1-2 million, quick google is very taxing. But, let's not digress.

    Bringing in a third party after the family already made their wishes known regarding organ donation and during the grieving process seems predatory and unethical.
    Quote from dangerous1
    @ traumaRUs, MSN, APRN, CNS


    In California, the same license practice of being an organ donor is done. I was wondering about the people that didn't respond yes or no on their license.

    I understand the role of the third party to show no impropriety. But, is it really ethical to persuade someone during the vulnerable state of grieving?

    And, thank you for the good read. It was an intelligent and thoughtful reply.
    Quote from OCNRN63
    @dangerous1: I understand how you feel. We had a similar policy when I worked in the ED, and it didn't sit well with me either. I remember watching a video where they showed the representative from the organ donation center approaching a grieving family shortly after they'd gotten the news about their loved one being brain dead. It was supposed to be a positive representation, but it really put me off.

    I don't think you're unintelligent for questioning these procedures. Better to question than to blindly follow.
    Wow, the timing of this thread is shocking!

    I'm in California as well and I work hospice. For our hospice patients in SNF, when they die, we have to call that 1-800 number. I've been doing it for years but recently it has gotten more difficult to deal with them. Even if you say the family has said no, they continue to ask you questions that take about 20 minutes to ascertain if the patient would be a candidate.

    I had a patient die a couple of days ago. Uterine cancer with mets everywhere. She had a large open necrotic coccyx wound. When she died, I called her family and then started the paperwork as I called the Donor Network. I told the rep the family said no and again, had to answer all the questions. Very detailed, H&P, labs, X-rays, MRI, CT scans, etc.

    The rep said the patient qualified for skin donation. I told her the family had already said no to donation - the legal rep of the family. I was told that another specially trained person would be calling back in an hour to talk with the family about donation and I should not talk to the family about the upcoming phone call or anything about donation.

    I was appalled. So, OP . . . I totally get your point.

    And I am in favor of donation.

    But this new way to change people's minds reminds me of Mortuaries and how they prey on the grieving families in order to get them to purchase more expensive caskets.

    "Predatory" and "unethical" indeed.

    I'm still fuming about it . . .


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