Content That LadysSolo Likes

Content That LadysSolo Likes

LadysSolo 4,240 Views

Joined Dec 17, '06. Posts: 179 (71% Liked) Likes: 440

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  • Jul 23

    what about rolling the stretcher to the ice machine and tell patient's to open his/her mouth? That's direct entry without cross contaminating!

  • Jul 16

    Pain management in this country has taken a giant leap backwards, taking on a medieval, draconian mindset.

    15-20 years ago there was a movement in the medical community to treat pain as the 5th vital sign. "Pain is what the pt says it is" was in all the nursing education annual competencies, and it was used as a subjective pt assessment tool. MS Contin had been around for years before this, and this long acting pain medication seemed to be used without any untoward societal consequences, as there were no daily news stories of abuse and death that I can recall back then when I was a new nurse. Then oxycontin was created as another adjunctive tool to ease the suffering, and increase the quality of life for of millions of chronic pain pt's. Before long a glut of news stories began to surface - reporting waves of crime, substance abuse, and death - hitting the daily news like a hail storm.

    What lead to this? Did oxycontin itself act as the catalyst that created this epidemic? That is certainly what I've surmised from the countless articles I've read on the subject over the years. But is this true? Did oxycontin create a hoard of mindless, slavering drug addicts - who'd sell their mother for a fix - from once previously pious, everyday people?

    Suddenly chronic pain pt's - all chronic pain pt's - were under scrutiny, and became objects of suspicion. It became a shameful thing to suffer from chronic pain and take routine Rx pain medication to offset the agony.

    Seemingly over night the view point regarding chronic pain did a 180° turnabout, leaving countless genuine pain sufferers in the lurch.

    Rx narcotic regulations changed, stating acute pain in some states could only be treated up to a 72 hr limit, and postoperative surgical pain for up to 7 days. Chronic pain is more difficult to receive proper treatment for now than ever. And if you actually have chronic pain you better be able to prove it beyond a shadow of a doubt.

    What if you, or one of your loved one's suffered chronic severe pain? What then?

    Those whom have abused narcotics, and those whom have abused and died from overdoses, have become the new poster children for the face of chronic pain. Due to the internet, news stories are able to be all around the world in a matter of hours, sensationalizing it even further.

    Long before the oxycontin news stories became a dime a dozen, there were still people who abused and misused - oxycontin didn't create these behaviors. And I'd like to point out those whom will abuse Rx narcotics will likely abuse any substance: ETOH, street drugs, illegally obtained Rx narcotics, cigarettes, aerosol chemicals, bath salts … the list goes on and on.

    What does this mean for those folks whom genuinely have a moderate-severe to severe chronic pain problem? They are SOL now, because those who've never experienced intractable, unremitting chronic pain have bundled them all together into one giant group and now treat them all the same.

    Many provider's attitudes toward pain is: "Pain hurts, and it is to be endured". There are people who literally cannot imagine what it is like to experience pain that never gets better or goes away. Pain that takes your breath away … pain that makes you cry. Most people's experiences with pain are acute situations that usually get better over time, move toward resolution, and eventually is gone for good. If you're lucky that is.

    Of course there are people who abuse narcotics - we've all meet them in the course of our career - or even in our private lives, however there are also those people who do not. Those that use their Rx meds exactly as Rx'd, who've stayed at the same dose well managed for years, who don't ask for early refills, don't come up with ridiculous stories that their Rx was stolen/lost/accidentally thrown out, don't ask for higher doses, don't have other illicit substances in their urine, don't doctor shop, don't visit the ER's, whom use the same pharmacy every time, and tough out their acute pain flairs at home quietly.

    My mother was that person before she died.

    Those people don't deserve to suffer as a group unfairly because of other people's actions. Each pt needs to be treated on a case by case basis. This does take time and energy - but what's the alternative? Condemning people to endure a lifetime of suffering that could otherwise be alleviated? I agree with the OP - this set's some pain sufferers up for suicide risk. I can think if at least 3 pt's in the past 22 years of my nursing career that were medically mismanaged and couldn't stand the constant severe pain a minute longer, taking matters into their own hands to do just that.

    I feel so very lucky my mother's pain was well managed, and she didn't live to experience the current totalitarian cultural climate of chronic pain pt's always being under suspicion. To see her suffer would have broken my heart.

    The Rx pain meds she took enhanced the quality of her life, and she told me many times that she would rather die than suffer though the pain she had underneath, that which the Rx pain meds blurred and softened around the edges, but never took entirely away.

    And I believed her too.

  • Jul 16

    While I do not have all of the answers I strongly disagree with pain is whatever the patient says it is. It might work if the patients were not aware of the rule. When you are sucking down a big mac meal and playing candy crush chuckling with your visitors, you do not need a phenergan shot for severe nausea and your pain is NOT a 10/10.

  • Jul 13

    OP please protect yourself. This is a scary situation and you need protection.
    Call an anonymous compliance number, get a lawyer, call the 800 number in some of the above posts. Most off don't be in any situation alone with him. Talk with security and have them walk you to your car. He is STALKING you and it is not likely to stop unless. You will have to be strong and fearless and start making small changes. Report to police, call the 800 safe number, call an anonymous complaint number.

  • Jul 13

    Quote from Shelby, BSN, RN
    I want to make it clear that I LOVE my job. I'm concerned that saying anything will jeopardize my job in some way. Other people have witnessed this, but I never kept a journal. I really didn't think it would last this long. I have no desire to get a lawyer.
    I have tried avoiding him and I walk away after he says or does something. Yesterday I walked away after he made a comment and he followed me and said "you don't need to be embarrassed around me and you don't have to walk away."
    There's no way I can't be under his supervision. He is the boss of all the nurses in the entire hospital (he's the boss of my boss (the nurse manager)). He isn't with me all day, but he sees me many times each day on the weekend days that I work.
    I guess I need to be more firm and actually say this is making me uncomfortable. I have preferred the more passive and avoidant approach because I wanted to avoid repercussions from him. I believe he could have me fired if he wanted to.
    "Please stop, this makes me uncomfortable". "My significant other frowns on me calling or texting other men, so please stop".

    When he makes the "bed" comments--give him deer in headlights look and state "I have no idea what you mean, this conversation is inappropriate".

    "Well, that escalated quickly! I do not date/flirt or otherwise engage inappropriately at work".

    You need to tell him to stop. If he does not stop, you could fill out an incident report, parent company website for an ethical breach (as this is your supervisor).

    You also need to realize that if you engage him in any sort of banter,(or even if you don't) other co-workers can also claim sexual harassment, as they are exposed to inappropriate sexual innuendo. And that could include reporting you as well.

    You also need to realize that people who are sexually harassing seek out someone that they more than likely realize are not going to say anything or report them. The are manipulative and skilled in this. And that he is an upper management person is a control and power issue to the nth degree.

    If you have "no one" to report him to, then go on your parent company website. He can be reported through that channel, usually under "ethics".

    Doesn't matter if you think he's dreamy and the best thing since sliced bread and oleo. Doesn't matter if he makes your skin crawl. You need to be certain that you are protected from being part of his pathology, and being reported for something yourself. People like him are sociopathic and career damaging.

  • Jul 13

    Oh. My. God.

    First of all, I applaud your self control. I'd have punched the reality back into him right in front of 10 coworkers and probably a cop. Speaking of cops, you need to call them and file a claim against this person. Screw the chain of command. Also, get a lawyer. I don't care if you have to work 5 days a week at a job you hate to afford one--if this is what it's going to take to keep you safe AND protect your nursing license, you need to do it. This kind of person is not used to being told no. When you do, he will retaliate against you which is why you need a lawyer. The dude sounds rape-y to be honest.

    OP, he is preying on you. He will not stop. You are in serious danger and you have to realize how urgent this situation is. I am 100% not kidding when I say to please buddy up with a trusted coworker when you leave work to get in your car. You said he's already approached you while you were in your car...how do you know he didn't put a tracker on it, or followed you home once when you weren't paying attention? I'm not trying to freak you out too badly, but at the same time...yes I am.

  • Jul 13

    Quote from heron
    If your story is true, then no - you are not overreacting.

    Seek a lawyer's advice. Sexual harassment is fiendishly hard to prove. It's also a huge liability issue for business organizations and they all have mechanisms to address it. They have a vested interest in suppressing and discouraging complaints, though, so you need someone on your side that they can't control.

    The first priority is your safety. Has he threatened you or your job? If so, get out!
    Is it possible to transfer out from under his direct supervision?

    Have you told him to stop? That needs to be your first move. You need to say it directly and preferably with witnesses. If you don't, when you report him, he'll simply claim that he "misunderstood your signals" and didn't know his advances were unwelcome.

    Have you kept a journal of incidents or related them to anyone on or off the job? Has anyone else witnessed this behavior or been subjected to it themselves?
    I want to repeat that: The first priority is your safety.

    Lets do it again: The first priority is your safety.

    And for good measure: The first priority is your safety.

    A lot has been said about being assertive and making it clear these advances are unwelcome. Two thumbs up for that advice.

    You are at this point in time already in an 'abusive relation'. Move forward treating it as such.

    I could go on and on about how he has already chipped away at your self esteem, your boundaries and everything else. It's what abusers do. And yes, the poster who said he knows who to do it with and not is right. You were targeted.

    But I want to stress something I've not seen mentioned yet that could prove invaluable to someone in your position.

    As I said, you are already in an abusive relation. Just because you've not dated or even flirted back doesn't mean his mind isn't racing and building up 'story'. You've not taken steps to cease the advances so he more than likely takes this as a sort of 'At least I have a chance' thing.

    Since, in his mind, there is 'something there', he will more than likely start displaying possessive behaviors soon. Expect him to be aggressive with others who 'get too close' to you (men and women alike). He will also manipulate you to isolate you more. He'll embarrass you around others so you shun groups. He'll push the barriers further, probably give you a nick name and start all sorts of fantasies involving you in his head.

    Be assertive to make sure it's clear his behavior is unwelcome, but proceed with caution. I'll say it again: In his mind, there is a relation already.

    Tell others right away when harassment happens. Don't wait for the next day or even until the shift is over. Start walking to your car with a buddy. Stay around others during breaks.

    Most of all, if it seems to be escalating and you sense anger at any point, run. Don't excuse yourself, don't walk away, run to where there are witnesses.

    Abusive people become most dangerous when they see the end of the 'relation' coming. It's a dangerous time to be around them. Don't be around him alone when it gets to this point.

    You say you are worried about your job? That is understandable. But lets repeat the mantra one more time: Your first priority is your safety.

    My rape came out of the blue, no warning signs what so ever. I knew the person and even dated him for a few months. Never would have guessed that he would even consider doing that. You are in a position where you get to see the monster before it's at your door. So lock the door, put a stop to it all and stay safe.

  • Jul 13

    Quote from Shelby, BSN, RN
    I want to make it clear that I LOVE my job. I'm concerned that saying anything will jeopardize my job in some way. Other people have witnessed this, but I never kept a journal. I really didn't think it would last this long. I have no desire to get a lawyer.
    I have tried avoiding him and I walk away after he says or does something. Yesterday I walked away after he made a comment and he followed me and said "you don't need to be embarrassed around me and you don't have to walk away."
    There's no way I can't be under his supervision. He is the boss of all the nurses in the entire hospital (he's the boss of my boss (the nurse manager)). He isn't with me all day, but he sees me many times each day on the weekend days that I work.
    I guess I need to be more firm and actually say this is making me uncomfortable. I have preferred the more passive and avoidant approach because I wanted to avoid repercussions from him. I believe he could have me fired if he wanted to.
    Passivity is, unfortunately, something that predators really like. Be clear. Be blunt. Tell him he is not allowed to touch you. Tell him you do not want his phone number and you will not contact him outside of work. Say as much "no" as possible in front of other people. Start that journal. Include names of witnesses. I've personally started favoring e-mails to myself about any big issue, because they are dated and timed.

    I had a doctor lean in with a hand on my shoulder (looking at my computer screen) and also flip my name tag over. I told him under no circumstances was he to touch me again. He apologized for making me uncomfortable and gave me space from then on because he was not a creep, just a dude with no personal space, and we both went about our business.

    Your choices are to get another job or to figure out how to fight him (or both, if you wish). Either route may take some time, so start documenting. Now.

  • Jul 13

    Quote from Shelby, BSN, RN
    I want to make it clear that I LOVE my job. I'm concerned that saying anything will jeopardize my job in some way. Other people have witnessed this, but I never kept a journal. I really didn't think it would last this long. I have no desire to get a lawyer.
    I have tried avoiding him and I walk away after he says or does something. Yesterday I walked away after he made a comment and he followed me and said "you don't need to be embarrassed around me and you don't have to walk away."
    There's no way I can't be under his supervision. He is the boss of all the nurses in the entire hospital (he's the boss of my boss (the nurse manager)). He isn't with me all day, but he sees me many times each day on the weekend days that I work.
    I guess I need to be more firm and actually say this is making me uncomfortable. I have preferred the more passive and avoidant approach because I wanted to avoid repercussions from him. I believe he could have me fired if he wanted to.
    Passive is easily misinterpreted.
    Be clear.
    Be direct.

  • Jul 13

    You need to stop this...like yesterday. Report this immediately to HR. Immediately!!!! Not only is it illegal but he is in a position of authority over you. If you rebuff him you may very well lose your job or worse. You are not overreacting. Yes, we've all told an off-color joke from time to time or the occasional double-entendre but he has laid his hands on you and that takes it to a whole 'nother level. Report him! NOW!

  • Jul 7

    A family member that insists their dying loved one be denied pain medicine for the reason of wanting them to be alert? That is the most selfish thing I have ever heRd of. If you want to be sure they remember you, do things with and for them while they are well, not out of guilt while they are dying. Real love is thinking of the dying person not yourself

  • Jul 2

    The posts in response to this article have me in tears. In these posts the LGBTQ community is basically called a bunch of sissy crybabies for attempting to express a grief response to this slaughter. So many dismissive posts with the tone of "how dare you try to make this about you again". Comparisons to criminals committing heinous crimes. So many claims that "it's a free country so I can hate you if I want to".

    49 people, part of a marginalized population, were gunned down in a place they thought was their "safe" place. Today, there are funerals happening and there are people outside of those funerals protesting, preaching hate while their loved ones come to grip with their tragic loss.

    For a group of people that I thought were supposed to be compassionate, I hear almost nothing but hate. I'm ashamed to be aligned with you today, absolutely ashamed.

    But this is what I know. The LGBTQ community is strong. This community has heard every single one of your hateful things said before, over and over again and survived. Every comparison to peadophiles, murderers and those into beastiality, every "sissy crybaby", every hateful word. They have seen every hateful glance, and felt every punch, spit, stab, trip, push and rape thrust upon them for being who they are. They have and they will survive your hate. Yes, the number of survivors will be less than hoped, yes many will die in their attempt to survive, but survive they will. As this is what we have endured for so very long.

    Sending peace, love and understanding out to everyone on this post. If you don't understand what all the fuss is about and care to try to understand, ask someone who can try to help you understand. Love will win. Love has to win.

    I apologize if if this wasn't as well worded as it could have been as I wrote it through tears.

  • Jul 2

    Quote from NurseGirl525
    It was an attack on this country. I weep for those in Orlando as I did for 9/11 and for Boston, among other attacks on our country.

    I dont go around saying but that was a heterosexual theater or building!! I bet there were heterosexual people in that club that night as I know sometimes I would go out with my homosexual friends to party back in the day when I did party. This is the problem, we are focusing more on the people's sexual orientation instead of what happened. People died. People were horrifically injured. Let's grieve that loss.

    People cant have it both ways. Either we are equal, or we are not. I weep that people who were so young and had their lives tragically taken or forever changed that night, should not have. I weep for the potential that is gone now. These people should be remembered for losing their lives way too early. Not who on earth they slept with. Because, I don't care who they chose to sleep with. I care that they were human beings who had potential to make a great difference in this world. And hate killed that.
    I'm a student nurse lurker who felt compelled to post about this. I appreciate your sentiment, but your refusal to acknowledge that this was, in fact, an attack on the gay community and that the gunman did, in fact, target these people in this place because he knew most of his victims would be gay makes you part of the problem.

    It's tacit homophobia like this - the refusal to acknowledge LGBT people and their spaces as their own - that snowballs and grows to create a culture where we're seen as "less than," or where our unique and continued struggles are ignored because "we're all humans." It's no different than saying "I don't see race - we're all American citizens" when the unfortunate fact of the matter is that white and black Americans have incredibly unequal experiences today.

    I appreicate your viewing this as a "human tragedy"...but maybe take a step outside your perspective and be willing to view this as an attack on a community that's not yours, and that you don't understand (I'm willing to bet on this considering you claim you "would go out to party with my homosexual friends back in the day" - there's nothing we love more than being objectified).

    Try to understand what it feels like to have one of the very few safe spaces you have - maybe the only space in your entire community where you feel completely free to "be you" - be completely violated.

    Empathize with us. Grieve with us. Acknowledge us.

  • Jun 29

    Amber did the right thing IMO

  • Jun 29

    Okay - Amber took control of a situation that was quickly spinning out of control. Not only did she do the right thing by taking a deep breath and taking a step back to regroup, she may have prevented a serious error and patient injury that can occur when circumstances rampage out of control. Amber has my respect. Sometimes enough is enough - even for 10 minutes.


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