Content That LadysSolo Likes

Content That LadysSolo Likes

LadysSolo 4,627 Views

Joined Dec 17, '06. Posts: 209 (70% Liked) Likes: 545

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  • Sep 24

    Being happy in your career and being happy in your personal life aren't mutually exclusive.

  • Sep 24

    Quote from blondy2061h
    I feel like you're setting yourself up for a negative self fulfilling prophecy if before you even start you're expecting not to be able to love your job and your personal life. Like it or not, if you work full time you're going to spend nearly a third of your life at work. Low stress jobs can tend to be dull jobs. My job isn't low stress, but I work with a great group of people and get some fantastic stories out of it. You might as well aim for more than tolerable.

    Love this!!!

  • Sep 22

    Quote from Elinor
    Yeeaahh... This may come as a shock, but you're just another kind of bad patient. The kind that doesn't want you to look at their veins, they just want to tell you to go in this one spot and that's that. And they don't care if you tell them that, in your professional judgement, they probably shouldn't be getting out of bed on their own right now -- they know best and they are going to do whatever the hell they want. The kind that is a total a-hole when you are just trying to do your job and get vitals and do assessments and give meds that you have to give because they "want to be left alone." You say "firm" -- I say "PITA."
    Why are they a "bad patient" for telling a nurse where they can get a vein in their arm? I totally welcome that kind of input because I don't know ther arm, but they do. Especially if this isn't their first rodeo in the hospital, they're used to the process and know which can arm a nurse can usually access the quickest. I don't want to stick them multiple times while looking for a vein - and I'm sure they don't want the experience of that happening, either.

    As far as wanting to be left alone afterwards, again, how does that make them a bad patient? Those are the patients I assess, give meds to, instruct how to use the call bell and then round on every few hours to make sure they're okay. Some people are very quiet and don't want to be bothered. I don't see how that makes them a bad patient, though.

  • Sep 19

    How about the two of you go in together, work as a team and clean it up,
    mess is gone.

  • Sep 18

    Quote from Elinor
    Yeeaahh... This may come as a shock, but you're just another kind of bad patient. The kind that doesn't want you to look at their veins, they just want to tell you to go in this one spot and that's that. And they don't care if you tell them that, in your professional judgement, they probably shouldn't be getting out of bed on their own right now -- they know best and they are going to do whatever the hell they want. The kind that is a total a-hole when you are just trying to do your job and get vitals and do assessments and give meds that you have to give because they "want to be left alone." You say "firm" -- I say "PITA."
    You sound very burnt out.

  • Sep 18

    Quote from Elinor
    Yeeaahh... This may come as a shock, but you're just another kind of bad patient. The kind that doesn't want you to look at their veins, they just want to tell you to go in this one spot and that's that. And they don't care if you tell them that, in your professional judgement, they probably shouldn't be getting out of bed on their own right now -- they know best and they are going to do whatever the hell they want. The kind that is a total a-hole when you are just trying to do your job and get vitals and do assessments and give meds that you have to give because they "want to be left alone." You say "firm" -- I say "PITA."
    I spent a few minutes trying to figure out why your response pissed me off so much, and I think I finally figured it out. You are one of those nurses who knows better than patients and is too busy ticking off your to-do list to be bothered with customizing care for your patients. Yes, it is inconvenient FOR US at times to change things up a bit to fit our patients' preferences, but that's also part of our job.

  • Sep 18

    I have had many, many RNs as family members of my patients. The common thread I've seen is that they feel they aren't being listened to, and they have rather medically insignificant (meaning it's not going to kill you) but important-to-them issues that have been left unresolved.

    I think that is rather common with many patients, but they trust the healthcare team more so they don't question it. In my opinion, nurses, in general, do not trust the healthcare system because we know how many things can go wrong or remain unaddressed for too long, even accidentally.

  • Sep 17

    Personally if I showered twice a day my skin would dry out so bad. I shower before I go to work. I don't shower when I get home, unless I had an extra nasty day. I don't change clothes or shoes before coming home either. I do leave my shoes right inside by the door and I change as soon as I get home. Maybe I'm just a gross person . It really is all about personal preference and I started this topic when I saw a nurse I work with change into different shoes before she left. It just got me wondering if this was common. I don't change out of my work shoes but like I said, I leave them right by the door and they're strictly work shoes.

  • Sep 17

    Americans are obsessed with hygiene. I shower before, then take a blessed break on my days off, when I bathe every other day. This saves my akin from the ravages of over bathing.

  • Sep 14

    Quote from compassionresearcher
    What is a "good" patient" vs. a "bad" patient? One who is too scared to speak their mind, ask questions, participate in the decisions regarding their healthcare... so they just go along with everything that is happening to them and make our lives easier.
    To me, a good patient asks for what she/he needs, asks questions, follows most or all of the treatment plan, understands delays sometimes happen, understands that the doctor may not do exactly what it is the patient or patient family wants and not blame the nurse, etc. A bad patient may be one who is demanding, tries to get the nurse to run and fetch regarding many details of care that we normally prioritize, wants to be treated extra special above and beyond other patients, and picks at the things that are out of the nurses' control, even if you explain or apologize or, at least, there is a reason for the snafu. God forbid they think of an intervention before you do or before you educate on it and mention it. A nurse as a patient or family member of a patient may fall into either category....and yes, sometimes they are a little of both like everyone else.

  • Sep 13

    A lot of people think the BON exists for nurses, that could not be further from the truth. Unlike the medical board, the nursing board takes a guilty until proven innocent in all cases and really doesn't need to prove you did wrong. The BON in almost every state exists to save the public from bad nurses and your license and your life are last on their lists of concerns. Some states are more forgiving in the restoration process, but all will cause you pain, even if you are innocent. Just an FYI

  • Sep 11

    It's an absurd argument.

    Nurses that are to obese to do the job fine keep them out, but that is a slim category of people. Pun intended.

    Most people comment how slim, and skinny I look. You know what though I am technically overweight slightly at 5'11 190 pounds.

    I think the standards of fitness we go by is absolutely absurd.

    The nurses health decisions are their own as long as they do not endanger the people they care for.

    Barring that I see no reason why preach patients rights about deciding their healthcare if you intend to revoke that right from healthcare workers.

  • Sep 8

    I'll tell you this. Telling someone that you don't know and you didn't bother checking tells that person all they need to know about you. And the responses you get are a direct result of that interaction.

  • Sep 3

    I personally find this whole debate offensive and abusive. I was 98 pounds and was diagnosed with a brain tumor, tumors on my thyroid. Suddenly I started gaining weight at a very rapid pace. 98 - 250 pounds in less than a year. I don't feel like I should apologise for my weight nor should I have to explain my weight to anyone. Nurses are meant to be compassionate and understanding. There are many reasons people have weight issues, even if it is a psychological one. Nurses should be kinder then they are. Shame on some of you! It is no secret that nurses are one of the biggest bullies to each other all the time yelling that they are professionals. If you are truly a professional you would judge people on their abilities and not superficially on appearance.

  • Sep 3

    Unfortunately, society including nurses are influenced by the media. Yes, people get fired, mocked, cussed at, and generally disrespected b/c they are overweight. Many are not going to like my comments but I've obtained four more years of education that you have given me the opportunity to share. I’m grateful for the opportunity. I will keep it as succinct as possible.
    The BMI is an inaccurate out dated tool and should not be used for accessing weight. There is no such thing as being overweight and healthy even though some experts tout that bit of misinformation. Over weight cannot be accurately measured by society, b/c according to the media one cannot be thin enough. We've lost touch with normal weight. The average height in the US is only 5'6" and that person should be in the neighborhood of 130lbs and depending on bone structure they may require more weight to be healthy--maybe as much as 159ish, but that too can vary depending on each individual.

    When one is overweight it signifies that they are dealing with inflammation. It means that there are a multiple underlying metabolic conditions that point to ill health. Inflammation manifests as weigh and depression.

    Yes, you must take care of yourself that includes taking care of yourself at work. How fast do you eat? If it takes less than 20 minutes to eat your meal, then the body measures it as being in stress. How stressed are you at work and in your life? Are you in a stress response when you are eating? If you are you cannot digest food adequately and you are losing nutrients because the body sloughs them off as a result of stress and producing cortisol. Are you angry, are you ill at ease in any situation? If you are then you are in a stress response as far as the body is concerned. What kind of food do you eat? That too can cause inflammation because you are stressing the system.
    Imbalanced nutrition can cause a stress response as well.

    Monsanto really doesn't care what you eat and they have tremendous influence over what the system says is healthy nutrition. There is a reason we hear the nutritional habits in the US are referred to as the standard American diet as SAD. There’s much more to it than this; I’ve only hit the heights.


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