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AnnieOaklyRN, BSN, RN, EMT-P 19,958 Views

Joined Oct 24, '06. AnnieOaklyRN is a RN, Paramedic. She has 'Previously ER RN, 17 years in EMS (yes, I still love it) , IV RN 8 months!' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'IV RN, (911) Paramedic'. Posts: 1,939 (31% Liked) Likes: 2,044

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  • Nov 22

    Anyone attending you during minor surgery retain their rights to free discussion.

    Politics, religion.. whatever. Get OVER yourself. As long as it does not breach HIPAA.. why would you care?

  • Nov 22

    I'll go against the majority a bit here and say that while it's not the wisest thing to do in front of patients, IMO it hardly ranks in the top 20 or maybe even top 50 unprofessional things that can be done in a hospital. Ratting on them for this is a tad overdramatic.

  • Nov 22

    I am with Annie on this one.

    Keep this in mind, OP. When you write a negative feedback, you not only put someone's job in jeopardy but risk being labeled as a whiner, and when something more serious happens, your next complaint will fall on death's ears.

    Every patient gets one "complain about the service" free card. Why waste a complaint over employees having a conversation on politics, especially if they did not involve the patient? You really want to get someone written up over that? :/

  • Sep 17

    Quote from NurseEmmy
    My employer doesn't seem too concerned about it, mainly because they haven't migrated to the Admin's office yet. I bet when that happens they will ramp up the effort to clear these blood suckers out.
    Meanwhile I am grossed out and paranoid.
    You should sneak a couple of them into the Admin's office. That'll get the ball rolling!

  • Sep 12




    This is my hobby/sport, if you will. I jump out of airplanes. I fly a wingsuit and do RW(relative work).



    I love being a Nurse.

  • Aug 21

    Quote from AvaRose
    Anything over $30K/year is more than necessary.
    Provided the cost of living is low in the area where you live. $30K there is not going to be anywhere near enough in places like LA or NYC.

    From February 2015:
    According to a Bloomberg report, the average monthly rent in February for a studio apartment in Manhattan is $2,351.
    That leaves $1,788 for an entire year's worth of expenses beyond housing. $30K is nowhere near enough to survive everywhere.

  • Aug 13

    Life advice: go for the least amount of debt possible.
    Even if it means starting your journey in an RN program at a community college. You can work while making your way through the various degrees and hoops by distance and have your employer help fund it.

  • Jun 13

    How tall are you and how much do you weigh? I know I can support some nurses, but some would topple over on me.

  • Jun 1

    I have been a RN for 11 years now, have seen much as many of you have. One thing that continues to irk me are nurses that think because they are a nurse are somehow a cross between Florence Nightingale and Jesus--and act like it. You know, "super nurse syndrome"

    I was at my local gym and saw the a T shirt that said:
    I sacrificed my life, so I could save your life. I am a nurse.
    Really? You sacrificed your life to be a nurse? WOW, I never realized that going to nursing school and getting a job involved life sacrifice.( like so many 100.000's people that go to college to get jobs).
    GET OVER IT ALREADY, your a nurse, your not mother Theresa, you don't walk on water and you DID NOT sacrifice your life to become a nurse.
    Nursing school and how hard it is, another thing that people want to whine/brag about I get tired of hearing about. Really? I'll bet becoming a chemical engineer is very hard, I'll be learning computer coding is very hard, in fact I'll bet most any college degree--they just don't hand them out for showing up. You have to work for them and earn them---just like nursing school.

    What I am saying is being a nurse does not somehow set you apart from the rest of the world, or make you a better person---just because your a nurse.

    Doing your job, being courteous to patients AND coworkers AND people in general is what we and everyone else on the planet should be doing----we are all members of the human family.

  • May 26

    Quote from melosa08
    I moved out about a year ago. My only complaints are if I don't do xyz, xyz will never get done. If I don't go grocery shopping, I won't have any food (thank goodness for delivery *Shout out Domino's Pizza*). If I don't do laundry, I'll run out of clean clothes. If I don't clean my apartment regularly, it'll become a mess.

    It would be sooo nice after a long day at work, to come home to a home cooked meal. If I don't feel like going to the store, I wish I had a significant other that would go for me. If I don't feel like cleaning (I'm never in the mood to clean), it would be nice to have somebody else do it this week. Etc, etc, etc.
    You dont need a significant other...you need a butler

  • May 23

    Ugh, what a horrible way to go, conscience and aware while your body is assaulted. Where is my DNR paperwork??

  • May 23

    Don't listen to them. I was a high school dropout and I went back when I was 38. MSN is getting a little ahead of yourself. A Masters might be too much. I would try working as a CNA, plus check out programs in your area for a BSN. Do a couple of prerequisites and see how it goes. You could even go the LPN-BSN route.Good luck to you.

  • Mar 20

    UH Rainbow is a great place to work, lots
    of applicants.

    I did not know that about Metro. What is the max an RN can make hourly there?

  • Mar 17

    Quote from AnnieOaklyRN
    I did always note how much more friendly the people are compared to my area
    Ohio is technically part of the Midwest, and people in the Midwestern states have always had a reputation for having bold friendliness.

    On the other hand, people in the Northeast are stereotyped as being more terse and direct, which can come across as rude to those who come from other regions.

  • Mar 17

    Go for it! My husband and I sold our house in the Northeast and moved thousands of miles away without ever having visited the place we were moving. We had no jobs, no place to live, and didn't know another soul here. It was exciting to explore somewhere totally new and make a new life. Now here we are, 15 years later, and we're gearing up to do it again! Although this time around we're checking out our potential new cities ahead of time and at least one of us will have a job secured in our new area before we make the move. Enjoy your adventure!


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