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jensfbay 4,000 Views

Joined Oct 19, '06. Posts: 70 (4% Liked) Likes: 5

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  • Aug 19

    Hello SB2SEA,

    PLU does find placements for your clinicals. The sites are generally in the Tacoma area, but some sites are in Olympia and Seattle too. The clinical coordinator will assign you a location, but you're allowed to trade clinical sites with the other people in your cohort. You'll likely receive your clinical assignments for the entire pre-licensure portion sometime in the first summer semester.

  • Aug 19

    There are a lot of variables to consider. Are you single? Do you have savings? Assets? Other debt? How old are you now and how much have you put away for your retirement already? Do you have children? If so, how much have you saved for their education? And so on.

    Generally speaking, the rule of thumb is never to assume more total educational debt than you can fairly anticipate earning in your first year starting salary. Know your market. Know your options. Speak to a tax accountant and a financial planner.

    Good luck

  • Aug 19

    I'm NP in Chicago, my application is still "under review" I am in an area with a score of 19 and my debt to income is 137%. I am pretty nervous that I haven't heard one way or another, yet. I pay over $1000 in loans every month. Hard to raise a family with that kind of debt.... Anyway I am trying to keep my hopes up. Looking forward to hearing from other people about this. I am wondering if it matters if they checked your credit or not? Has anyone heard that they were denied? Thanks!

  • Aug 18

    I completely agree with you. The grass will be greener where you water it.

  • Aug 18

    Hi mzaur! As of today, CA has recovered from Arnold's poor mngt and budget skills.. Thanks to our new governor, Jerry Brown, CA actually has a surplus in overall state budget and Calpers pension is in the process of recovering big time from the crash of 2008.. This year, Calpers had the highest investment gains since 2003... While it will take years to recover, everything is looking better and brighter in CA
    Well, the standard of living is still the highest in the country.. No doubt bout that.. I guess thats what we pay for nice beaches and sunny skies

  • Aug 18

    In my neck of the woods, retail health pays well. Granted I am a new grad FNP, but new grad starting salary is $107,000/year (based on a 40 hour work week).

  • Aug 18

    Quote from J-Swish
    The reason I ask is because while Psychiatric-Mental Health is a strong passion of mine, I am also interested in other specialties, such as Internal Medicine, Emergency Medicine, Family, Derm, etc. In other words, an FNP.

    What's the big difference?
    If PMHNP is your passion, then you already know the correct path. And I won't mention the fees some PMHNPs have:

    FEES: Our standard cash fees are:
    • Initial psychiatric evaluation / diagnostic interview consultation - $225 / session.
    • Medical psychotherapy (psychotherapy with medication management) $150 / 45-50 min.
    • Psychotherapy without medication management $130 / 45-50 min
    • Medication management with counseling $125 / 20-30 min.
    • Medication management only $100 / 10-20 min typically though this is not a time based service

  • Aug 18

    I also agree that you should go for PMHNP if you really want to treat psych patients. As a FNP, you're not going to be trained in very much other than basic psych, it's a separate specialty. Also, some states do not like FNPs practice in psych and more are cracking down on that. Also, I think psych NP is more lucrative. As with everything, it's all about your location. Can FNPs practice psych in your state? This will influence the demand for PMHNP services.

  • Aug 18

    IMO its totally worth it to take out $80 to 100k to pay for the PMHNP program. You can get loans to cover the whole cost. Then you can do an NHSC loan repayment program where you get $60k toward loans for a two year contract (on top of your salary). You'll be starting at $80k+ as a PMHNP, and if you are willing to move from your location, you could be making way more. I've seen positions in certain areas that start at $110k. My point is that the loans can easily be paid off. If you are willing to live frugally, they can be gone in < 4 years. I think it makes no sense to get an FNP if you are interested in PMHNP. With the amount of money and time you'll spend switching, it's absolutely not worth it. All of the comorbidities and medical knowledge mentioned above will be taught in a PMHNP program.

  • Aug 18

    Quote from jensfbay
    Mom with 3 and 5 year old here stating NP program in the summer. Another question is, how are you guys budgeting school, mortgage, kid expenses? Work par time and go to school part time? Unfortunately, my supportive spouse doesn't make enough to financially support all of this. I make half of our household income so it would be a big financial strain for us.
    Student loans. Not ideal, but I dropped to 3/4 time at work and used loans to make up the difference. I'm the primary breadwinner so I viewed it as a temporary investment.

  • Aug 17

    I am 57 years young and is searching like crazy for a psych NP program online. Got rejected from Georgia Southern BSN to DNP program but I will not be discouraged. I have no time for that so I have chosen to keep it moving. I finished a BSN program in 2015 because I swore that I had to be a nurse, so here I am now wanting to go another mile. All you younger nurses (40s 50s+) don't you give up. Find a way to achieve your dream now because the regret can be too much.

  • Aug 17

    Im a PsychNP here in AZ so not sure how much you would make outside of the psych world BUT I can tell you this I make a heck of a lot more than an RN. (except for the VA which is another post). You have more flexibility as an NP with regards to scheduling. I am a bit insane and choose to work x3 16hr shifts and x1 8hr. What can I say I like my money. But I do know of a lot of part time jobs at urgent care clinics,hospitals etc. You do not have to work Mon-Fri 8hr days. Plus I dont work holidays AT ALL.
    I had no idea what a PsychNP did before I started my program was not even sure if I wanted to be one. I was so happy by the time I was done with school. After 7 RN years I was done being a bedside nurse.
    You are so young you can take a year or so off. See if you really want to be an NP. Once you start planning kids though things get trickier. I have no children so I have no idea how some of my classmates juggled school, work, kids. Working full time and going to school part time was enough for me. Good Luck!

  • Aug 17

    I completed NP school with 3 children under age 5 (youngest was 6 months when I started), so I know without a doubt how difficult it is. But I also know without a doubt that it can be done!! My husband and I discussed my waiting until the kids were in school, but ultimately decided they would remember my "absence" more when they were older. We also knew it would strain us physically and financially, but decided we could do anything for 2 years. As it stands, my oldest (now 10) remembers me having to study a lot, but the other 2 don't remember a thing. They only know that I now have a job I love "helping sick kids" and I am home every evening and weekend.

    While in school, I worked full-time weekend option which allowed clinical hours during the week. I did most of my studying early morning before kids woke up, during nap time, and late at night once kids were in bed. If I had a big project or exam coming up, I focused on that and my husband took over dinner/ bedtime duties. He deserves a medal for supporting me during that time! Anyways, it was a hard couple of years and I lived in a sleep-deprived haze, lol, but I hardly remember it now and those temporary sacrifices were absolutely worth it!

  • Aug 17

    Here is my situation. I'm 27 and applying for direct entry psychiatric NP programs this fall. I have a fiance but we have no plans to have kids. I just finished a second BA in psychology (first one was in philosophy but decided against getting the PhD). I currently have 50k in debt and will likely have 130-150k once I am done with the MSN. I would never take on this much debt unless I knew it could be paid off easily. I plan on doing NHSC loan repayment program for 2 years after graduation which will knock off $60k right off the bat. Then I plan on putting at least $20k per year toward loans, depending on the cost of living where I will be. My salary at my second job (after the two year contract at NHSC is up) will be higher, so I'll be able to put at least $30k per year toward loans. So if all goes to plan, I'll have all my debt paid off within 4-5 years after graduation. Not bad at all.

    That said, I wouldn't recommend just anyone do this. Only if you are comfortable moving geographically for your job (since your current location might be saturated/low salary), are comfortable living frugally for a few years after graduation, and also only if you get into a good nursing school with a solid reputation.

  • Aug 17

    well...good for you! I however made the decision to take all my classes at once and get the program done and over with as soon as I can. I can focus my all my time on my studies and wont be pulled elevently billion directions. So for me, this was the better choice.


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