Latest Comments by Jolie

Jolie 31,429 Views

Joined Oct 17, '01. Posts: 9,610 (48% Liked) Likes: 14,008

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  • 0

    Quote from FolksBtrippin
    No such thing as "abuse" of your paid time off. You're not an abuser if you don't want to see a doctor.

    Take care of yourself.

    I agree that taking care of yourself is the key, and don't believe that seeing a doctor is the only way to accomplish that.

    What I do believe is that calling out (typically on short notice, when one is taking a mental health day) IS abusive if nothing is done to address the source of mental distress.

    So if you're staying home from work using sick time to sleep in, down a six pack, and watch Netflix, that's a different story than researching support groups, taking yoga, getting a massage or seeing a therapist.

  • 10
    Howej1, rn1965, VivaLasViejas, and 7 others like this.

    If your physical or mental condition prevents you from performing your job duties, then it is appropriate to call out sick. However, just as you would consult a healthcare provider for a physical illness, it is your responsibility to seek appropriate care for your mental health. If you fail to do so, you are just taking time off, which is an abuse of your sick time.

  • 0

    Please accept my answer in the spirit it is intended: as a practical response, not a harsh one.

    It doesn't matter a whit which rotation you do first. Not a single patient, faculty member or future employer will ever ask or care. Please don't stress yourself out over this non-issue, when there are so many real concerns in life.

    Good luck to you.

  • 6

    It sounds to me like neither the family nor agency are bothering to address a problem that is not yours.

    I have worked NICU in a number of different cities and was responsible for planning discharges. That often involved setting up homecare, including equipment and staffing. I don't ever recall a situation where we were unable to make arrangements in advance for designated parking, coordination with EMS, and guarantee of utility service for families with medically fragile children.

    If this isn't happening, I believe it is because someone isn't bothering to request it.

  • 0

    You need to contact the MD BON to clarify their requirement.

    Does the practice requirement begin upon graduation or upon receiving your initial license? Since you just passed NCLEX and received your first license, the continuing practice requirement may just be beginning, in which case you would be eligible for a MD license, providing everything else is in order.

    Or do they go back to your graduation date and begin the continuing practice requirement then, in which case, although your license is new, you have not met the requirement.

    If MD says that you do not meet the continuing practice requirement, you can either take a refresher course, or find a state in which you are eligible to practice and get 1000 hours under your belt before moving to MD.

  • 10

    Quote from cyc0sys
    If long 'press on finger nails' are required to complete your professional ensemble and paramount to your emotional well being, you might want to consider becoming a Medical Aesthetician. It would give you a great opportunity to work with patients, in a medical environment, who could benefit from your keen sense of style and fashion while allowing you to maintain your jazzy appearance.
    Frankly, I wouldn't see a medical aesthetician with long fake nails, either. The same infection control concerns apply here as in the in-patient setting.

  • 3

    You left the workforce to attend to personal and family matters and are now eager to return. Best of luck to you!

  • 0

    Quote from hppygr8ful
    Sure - my son is planning to go out of state which increases our cost. Even at 45K per year plus books and miscellaneous expenses that comes to 180K which is roughly in the mid range of what I stated. Thankfully the man cub is an exceptionally gifted athlete so we may attract some scholarship funds. I have attached one of the basic sources I used to back up my statements.

    What's the Price Tag for a College Education? - COLLEGEdata - Pay Your Way

    Hppy

    I absolutely agree that the full cost of attendance without financial aid or scholarships can easily reach $250K for college. Just wanted to clarify that figure is not for tuition alone, even at the most pricey institutions.

    Good luck to your son on his search

  • 4
    brownbook, Destin293, MelEpiRN, and 1 other like this.

    Quote from hppygr8ful
    Well, I am researching colleges with my son who will be heading off in 2020 or 2021 and have found that the average college tuition for a BA/BS in the United States is somewhere between $100,000.00 and $250,000.00. I would say $80.000.00 is a bargain if you are getting a degree from a fully accredited College or University. If however you are going to a for profit private nursing school beware as some of your BSN credits may not transfer if you choose to move forward and earn your MSN or higher.

    Hppy
    Hppy,

    Please clarify: You state that the average tuition for a Bachelor's Degree in the US is $110K - $250K. By any chance, do you mean the total cost of attendance at a private US college? I believe you may be mixing apples and oranges.

    My daughter is attending a private university. On paper, the yearly cost of attendance at VEU (Very Expensive University) is $65K, falling in the upper range of your quote above. Tuition amounts to $45K. The other $20K is mostly housing, meal plan, travel, and some other optional charges such as supplemental student health insurance. I suppose someone there may actually be paying $65K, but I highly doubt that accounts for many students, as virtually everyone there receives financial assistance of some sort that doesn't have to be repaid (grants, scholarships, work-study, etc.). Expenses not covered by these means are paid out of pocket or financed by loans. With the savings we already have in place, Dear Daughter will graduate without debt.

    She considered a state university in our home state, with much lower tuition, housing and fees, which would have actually cost her MORE out of pocket than she is paying at VEU, because she was not offered any significant financial assistance there.

    So while I applaud your early research and fully support any student's efforts to graduate without debt, please don't be put off by sticker price tags. If your child is genuinely interested in a particular school, I highly recommend establishing a relationship early on with the recruitment office and learning what kind of financial assistance is available. You may be pleasantly surprised.

  • 4

    Houseplant, bouquet of cut flowers, home made cookies or brownies, a recipe mix in a Mason jar, hand cream, foot soak (you can home-make this in a Mason jar, too), a small journal or pretty calendar book, scented candle, coffee mug, nice hand soap, etc.

    Basically, any small luxury that s/he might not take the time or money to buy her/himself. Thanks for being thoughtful

  • 23

    I was oriented to my second nursing job by a nurse who had submitted her resignation. By the end of the first shift, I was enlightened on all of the internal problems of the unit and the hospital. She was 100% right about everything but those are not details that need to be shared with a wide-eyed newbie. With this information to jump start my career, I quit not long after orientation.

    Working the "notice" period can be undeniably awkward, but rarely have I known co-workers to mistreat a departing staff member. I have known a handful of people who called out on their last day and missed their own parties. Served them right.

  • 1
    NutmeggeRN likes this.

    This sounds a lot like home health nurses who set up weekly meds for clients to self administer or family to give at home. I don't think it amounts to dispensing, but I guess your BON should answer that.

  • 3
    GmaPearl BSN RN, OldDude, and Flare like this.

    To my knowledge, no. My daughter attends school out of state and we asked about this before she moved, because she takes a number of prescription medications. As long as your state pharmacy board allows scripts from out of state prescribers to be filled (and hers does), I don't believe there is any legal restriction on school personnel administering them.

    As a practical matter, her local doctor asked us to find a physician near her school to co-manage her care in the event that she has a change in condition, because she is halfway across the country and will only be home over holidays, but the new physician has not re-written any of her prescriptions. She is utilizing refills from the original RXs written by her doctor at home.

  • 1
    VivaLasViejas likes this.

    If anyone here would like a good perspective on the categorization of psychiatric meds and the attached stigma, I highly recommend reading "A Spectrum Approach to Mood Disorders" by James Phelps, MD.

    He also maintains a website with much of the same information. I wish I had been introduced to these concepts years ago.

    PsychEducation | Treating the Mood Spectrum

  • 1
    Kooky Korky likes this.

    Quote from morte
    the bible does not discuss abortion, never mind negatively. and it did exist in those times.
    The Bible does not discuss bombs made from fertilizer, the use of airplanes as weapons of mass destruction or gas chambers, either.

    We are taught "Thou shalt not kill..."

    I'll agree to disagree, but have no doubt that the aforementioned Commandment refers to the willful destruction of innocent life, regardless of the means.


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