Content That Jolie Likes

Jolie 29,520 Views

Joined Oct 17, '01. Posts: 9,569 (48% Liked) Likes: 13,832

Sorted By Last Like Given (Max 500)
  • Aug 10

    NCLEX pass rates are a poor way to evaluate a school. The NCLEX pass rate only tells you what percentage of their graduates pass the NCLEX. What you really need to know is what percentage of the people who originally enroll pass the NCLEX. Attrition rates in for-profit schools are generally high. If 95% pass the NCLEX but only 75% of the students who start actually graduate, that's not very good. Many schools, both for-profit and taxpayer funded schools give exit exams to manipulate the pass rate percentages. If you don't do well on the exit exam, you aren't allowed to graduate. This prevents weaker students from taking the NCLEX.

    The other thing you want to know is how many students graduate on time, not just graduate. The accrediting agencies consider on-time graduation to be 150% of the scheduled program duration. If you take 6 semesters to complete a 4 semester program, technically you are considered an on time graduate.

  • Jul 20

    Quote from Invasion1
    He should have kept his mouth sealed.
    He should have stayed the heck out of this pt's chart.

  • Jul 17

    No, it is not a HIPAA violation. However, the people who need to answer your question are at your work place. Plenty of places tell their staff their own adulterated version of HIPAA and conflate it with their own "privacy practices" as well. The Feds are not monitoring your chart activity; the people who are in a position to make any issue out of anything you do in a chart are within your own organization. Your manager needs to get an official answer for you, and my suggestion would be that you email the question so that you receive the answer in writing.

    Short version: The question you need to ask is not whether this is a HIPAA violation (as it clearly is not) but rather, whether it violates any workplace-specific policies.

  • Jul 12

    Quote from TriciaJ
    I think you're right to contact the doctor at this point. His staff are going to kill his practice with their stupidity. He really needs to know what's going on.
    Yep. If he is a partner or practice owner, definitely. If he's employed, I'd contact the patient experience/satisfaction people, since under those circumstances he will have zero control over it.

  • Jul 12

    Quote from Jolie
    I asked if she was aware that HIPAA does not prevent someone other than the patient from making appointments. She said she couldn't discuss anything with me about my daughter, including her appointments.

    I then asked why she called my cell phone to remind me about something she wouldn't discuss with me, when she has my daughter's contact information?!?! That left her grasping for words.
    Excellent. Unbelievable. People don't THINK. Half the time they aren't allowed to anyway!

    Mandatory inservice awhile back, we were told that the key to reducing errors was to eliminate the need for critical thinking and human problem-solving as much as possible because that's where things go wrong. They touted the many ways they have been working at reducing our need to think critically. So now you know. That pretty much explains everything, doesn't it!

  • Jul 12

    Quote from Jolie
    This! I would have just called back as Ali, but I have a raging case of bronchitis and wouldn't fool anyone.

    Update: I got a call Monday evening on my cell reminding me of my daughter's appointment. I reiterated my conversation from last week (which was with another employee). The woman on the phone acknowledged that she knew all about the first conversation, as she was the supervisor of the previous caller, who "reported" our conversation.

    I then pointed out that she already knew that Ali couldn't keep the appointment, so I didn't understand the purpose of this call. I swear I was looking for the Candid Camera by this time. She chewed me out for not having Ali call the office Monday to confirm what I had already told them. I reminded her that Ali was out of town and not available by phone. I would have Ali call at her earliest convenience which will be less than 48 hours prior to her scheduled appointment, and why I had called in the first place.

    I asked if she was aware that HIPAA does not prevent someone other than the patient from making appointments. She said she couldn't discuss anything with me about my daughter, including her appointments.

    I then asked why she called my cell phone to remind me about something she wouldn't discuss with me, when she has my daughter's contact information?!?! That left her grasping for words.

    Ali called and cancelled. They still had her appointment in the schedule and tried to argue with her that she would be held responsible. I was proud of her for standing up for herself.

    We're done with the office. I'll contact the doctor on his cell and let him know. ARGH!

    Ok this crossed the line. Definitely call

  • Jul 12

    I think you're right to contact the doctor at this point. His staff are going to kill his practice with their stupidity. He really needs to know what's going on.

  • Jul 12

    I would have waited an hour, called in as Ali, said luckily my plane had a lay over, and rescheduled. But I call places as my mom all the time (with her permission/ asking me to) since my hours allow me to do so.

  • Jul 12

    Ugh! This is a pet peeve of mine with misunderstanding HIPAA. I had a patient come in with her mother. Patient then decided she didn't want to be seen and walked out. The receptionist refused to let mom rescheduled patient's appointment because it was a "HIPAA violation". I instructed the receptionist to reschedule with mom and she refused and took the matter to the "executive director (doctor's wife)" who agreed with receptionist. So, I cut and pasted multiple examples directly from HIPAA website showing they are wrong.

  • Jul 12

    Quote from JKL33
    mmj, I hear you and I agree with you. The problem with it, though, is that they also can't confirm that "Ali" is Ali. If that's the line we want to take with people, well then we should just hardly ever be using the phone, period. That's the part about all of this that makes people mad; it's nonsensical. It's not like she called and said that "Ali's" dog ate her oxycontin and she needs more immediately...
    Exactly. Stupid rules breed contempt. Next time the OP could simply say that she is her daughter.

  • Jul 12

    I agree that HIPAA is poorly understood and frequently invoked erroneously. As far as front line staff goes, the direct blame for this goes to the institution/facility for their fear-mongering regarding HIPAA. Everyone who has been to any inservice about it knows exactly what I'm talking about. In a way, I don't blame them (institutions/corporations) for trying to keep it black and white, because they really can't afford to leave HIPAA up to the best judgment of thousands of different employees. On the other hand, they never miss an opportunity to make it overly reductive while also throwing in a few threats and "examples" to scare people.

  • Jul 12

    Quote from Jolie
    I'm equally aggravated that people have such poor understanding of HIPAA that they invoke it for virtually any situation, regardless of whether it is a violation or not.
    We run into this all of the time. It is NOT a HIPAA violation to fax a progress note/lab results/imaging results to another physician if the other physician is involved in the patient's care. It does not require an ROI to be signed. I'm happy to fax a cover sheet first so you know I'm legit or have you google the phone number and call me back to make sure but to have to figure out how to get the 86 year old who does not have a computer and lives three hours away to sign a sheet to release freaking lab results is crazy.

    The same in the ED. If I have a LOL with decreased LOC and call the pharmacy she has listed in her chart to try to get a list of current medications I shouldn't have to give thinly veiled threats about potential litigation to get you to comply. Google the hopsital number, call it and ask for Wuzzie. I'll be there.

  • Jul 10

    Seems weird to me. I worked as a caregiver for a while and constantly scheduled and rescheduled appointments on behalf of clients. As long as I knew their identifying information no one gave me a problem.

    While it is true that once your child hits 18 s/he is responsible for their own care and parents no longer have any right to their health information. Calling to cancel/reschedule an appointment (with appropriate identifying information) is typically admitted. Just to be on the safe side if your daughter wants you to be involved in her health care and have her sign a ROI with the clinic.

  • Jul 10

    No big deal! And with that information I see what you're saying...when Mom called, they should've just had her verify HER identity by asking for those details that she would have if she's actually the mom. I agree.

    As far as the rudeness, it's true, we don't know how rude she was. And people do get upset at us when they run into a roadblock that we can't control. I just overwhelmingly see staff not handling these situations with care. Nurses tend to be a little better at finessing the situation (not always...). We (many staff) tend to act like we're violating HIPAA if we let someone finish a sentence or "hear" what they have to say! And listening to a dang question or brief concern/reason for calling is just not a HIPAA violation.

    What if the Mom in the OP was calling about an urgent matter?? Well...too bad, because the receptionist stopped her as soon as she said she was the patient's mother. I don't need people to be sickeningly sweet to me, but I just think that's rude.

  • Jul 10

    Quote from JKL33
    You think her mother doesn't have that information??
    Sorry JKL33 I should have quoted MMJ not you. My bad. I'll see if I can fix it.


close