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Jolie 31,361 Views

Joined Oct 17, '01. Posts: 9,610 (48% Liked) Likes: 14,008

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  • Dec 10

    Get a copy of Merenstein & Gardner's Handbook of Neonatal Intensive Care or AWHONN's Core Curriculum for Neonatal Intensive Care Nursing to read and reference as needed.

    Make a cheat sheet with norms of vital signs and common lab values to carry with you.

    Ask your instructor or preceptor for a list of commonly used drugs in the NICU and familiarize yourself with them. Do students still make drug cards?

    Prepare basic care plans for some of the common conditions you will see in your NICU, such as prematurity, respiratory distress syndrome, glucose instability, infection, as well as a surgical diagnosis or two, if your facility does neonatal surgery. Not all NICUs do.

    This should keep you busy for a weekend, and is a good foundation on which to start. I used to precept students in the NICU, and loved doing it. No one expects you to know much in the beginning. By being prepared, you will give your preceptor confidence that you can be trusted. NEVER assume anything. Always ask before doing, and review charting before it is finalized.

    Enjoy your experience.

  • Dec 10

    If your physical or mental condition prevents you from performing your job duties, then it is appropriate to call out sick. However, just as you would consult a healthcare provider for a physical illness, it is your responsibility to seek appropriate care for your mental health. If you fail to do so, you are just taking time off, which is an abuse of your sick time.

  • Dec 4

    If your physical or mental condition prevents you from performing your job duties, then it is appropriate to call out sick. However, just as you would consult a healthcare provider for a physical illness, it is your responsibility to seek appropriate care for your mental health. If you fail to do so, you are just taking time off, which is an abuse of your sick time.

  • Dec 4

    If your physical or mental condition prevents you from performing your job duties, then it is appropriate to call out sick. However, just as you would consult a healthcare provider for a physical illness, it is your responsibility to seek appropriate care for your mental health. If you fail to do so, you are just taking time off, which is an abuse of your sick time.

  • Dec 3

    If your physical or mental condition prevents you from performing your job duties, then it is appropriate to call out sick. However, just as you would consult a healthcare provider for a physical illness, it is your responsibility to seek appropriate care for your mental health. If you fail to do so, you are just taking time off, which is an abuse of your sick time.

  • Dec 3

    If your physical or mental condition prevents you from performing your job duties, then it is appropriate to call out sick. However, just as you would consult a healthcare provider for a physical illness, it is your responsibility to seek appropriate care for your mental health. If you fail to do so, you are just taking time off, which is an abuse of your sick time.

  • Dec 3

    If your physical or mental condition prevents you from performing your job duties, then it is appropriate to call out sick. However, just as you would consult a healthcare provider for a physical illness, it is your responsibility to seek appropriate care for your mental health. If you fail to do so, you are just taking time off, which is an abuse of your sick time.

  • Dec 3

    If your physical or mental condition prevents you from performing your job duties, then it is appropriate to call out sick. However, just as you would consult a healthcare provider for a physical illness, it is your responsibility to seek appropriate care for your mental health. If you fail to do so, you are just taking time off, which is an abuse of your sick time.

  • Dec 3

    Muno, you are an intelligent and well-written individual.

    You can't possibly miss the irony of the argument you continually make that our previous catastrophic insurance plan was substandard because it COULD HAVE BEEN discontinued at the insurer's will, when the policies that ACTUALLY HAVE BEEN cancelled are the Obamacare compliant policies we carried in 2015, 2016 and again in 2017.

    Nor your explanation that our pre-Obamacare catastrophic policy did not include hospitalization (it did.) This year, our daughter had emergency surgery and a 3 day hospital stay. We are grateful that her condition was promptly and effectively treated with minimal expense. Because her covered expenses were billed at less than $15,000, our insurance paid nothing. We wrote checks totaling nearly $13,000, and are still battling with the insurance company over the final $300 for oral medications dispensed during her inpatient stay that they say should have been filled at a local pharmacy. So yes, given this scenario, we were much better off pre-Obamacare when we would have paid the first $5000, then cost shared to our OOP max. Pre-Obamacare, we paid about $1000 LESS in monthly premiums than we do now, another $12,000 in yearly savings.

    I'm amused by your repeated questions about my suggestions for making healthcare more affordable. We've done this dance before, so feel free to scroll thru the archives. My ideas haven't changed much over the years.

    My purpose for posting our family's experience is to call attention to the INDIVIDUAL MARKET, which few people, including many posters here understand. Obamacare is failing in virtually every respect, but no-where as fast and furious as in the individual market. The numbers change rapidly, but somewhere in the neighborhood of 60% of Americans who must purchase individual (family) insurance have no choice of policies or insurers. Imagine if every employer in a particular state was forced to drop insurance plans that they and their employees found satisfactory and instead enroll in a single, crappy plan with high costs and few providers. Then imagine that happening over and over again every year, with costs going up and provider lists shrinking until there was no plan left at all. And then imagine that those employees had to fully pay the premiums and out of pocket costs (upwards of $30,000 to $45,000 per year) with after-tax dollars. And then imagine if those employees with college age children attending school away from home had to purchase yet another insurance plan for those young adults because theirs provided no services (other than ER) for out of area care.

    This is what happens when people fail to understand that insurance is not the same thing as healthcare. At this rate, we will soon be among the growing ranks of people carrying very expensive insurance cards in their wallets that they can not afford to use. Or not. As our state insurance commissioner accurately predicts, next year's premiums may well be the breaking point for a majority of non-subsidized individual policyholders. We can no longer afford to pay for everyone else's healthcare before our own.

  • Dec 3

    If your physical or mental condition prevents you from performing your job duties, then it is appropriate to call out sick. However, just as you would consult a healthcare provider for a physical illness, it is your responsibility to seek appropriate care for your mental health. If you fail to do so, you are just taking time off, which is an abuse of your sick time.

  • Dec 2

    If your physical or mental condition prevents you from performing your job duties, then it is appropriate to call out sick. However, just as you would consult a healthcare provider for a physical illness, it is your responsibility to seek appropriate care for your mental health. If you fail to do so, you are just taking time off, which is an abuse of your sick time.

  • Dec 2

    If your physical or mental condition prevents you from performing your job duties, then it is appropriate to call out sick. However, just as you would consult a healthcare provider for a physical illness, it is your responsibility to seek appropriate care for your mental health. If you fail to do so, you are just taking time off, which is an abuse of your sick time.

  • Nov 30

    Quote from moondancer
    Good morning, NICU nurses! I have a question for you...
    I currently work in a NICU where the pharmacy prepares all of our meds, all IV's, TPN, IL, drips, etc. I am looking at a job where, I have been told, the nurse mixes all the drips, meds, etc. I am wondering if you have standard concentrations for dopamine and dobutamine drips? For example...how much dopamine do you mix in to your bag? What is the final concentration?
    I just want to be prepared....if this comes up when talking to the nurse mgr.
    Thanks for your help!

    Except in the case of a dire, unforseen emergency, I firmly believe that all meds, drips and emergency drugs should be prepared and dispensed by pharmacy, not nursing. We are not trained pharmacists and already have enough liability without adding that of preparing meds, especially those which require complex calculations. I would want to know why this unit still adheres to a very old practice of requiring nurses to prepare meds when undoubtedly there are pharmacists available. It might be a red flag that other aspects of unit management are not current, either.

    That said, if this is the unit practice, then there should be policies and procedures which standardize medication preparation and administration. In one unit where I worked, pharmacy prepared a weekly med sheet based on current weight which was taped at each infant's bedside (HIPAA, I know!) listing the baby's dose of each code drug and instructions for preparing common drips.

    I'd definitely raise the issue at an interview and inquire about medication policies and procedures, training for new nurses, etc.

  • Nov 30

    The baby was choking and you relieved an airway obstruction. A comparison would be an adult DNR patient who chokes on a sandwich at lunch. In that case, would you stand by and withhold the Heimlich maneuver? I don't believe you would.

    Intervening to alleviate a witnessed choking episode prevented this baby from experiencing an untimely and excruciating death. I believe that is far different than resuscitating a patient whose natural death is imminent due to a known and non-recoverable condition.

  • Nov 18

    Quote from cyc0sys
    If long 'press on finger nails' are required to complete your professional ensemble and paramount to your emotional well being, you might want to consider becoming a Medical Aesthetician. It would give you a great opportunity to work with patients, in a medical environment, who could benefit from your keen sense of style and fashion while allowing you to maintain your jazzy appearance.
    Frankly, I wouldn't see a medical aesthetician with long fake nails, either. The same infection control concerns apply here as in the in-patient setting.


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