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Jolie 29,632 Views

Joined Oct 17, '01. Posts: 9,572 (48% Liked) Likes: 13,836

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  • Aug 22

    Quote from dienw
    NCLEX pass rates are a poor way to evaluate a school. The NCLEX pass rate only tells you what percentage of their graduates pass the NCLEX. What you really need to know is what percentage of the people who originally enroll pass the NCLEX. Attrition rates in for-profit schools are generally high. If 95% pass the NCLEX but only 75% of the students who start actually graduate, that's not very good. Many schools, both for-profit and taxpayer funded schools give exit exams to manipulate the pass rate percentages. If you don't do well on the exit exam, you aren't allowed to graduate. This prevents weaker students from taking the NCLEX.

    The other thing you want to know is how many students graduate on time, not just graduate. The accrediting agencies consider on-time graduation to be 150% of the scheduled program duration. If you take 6 semesters to complete a 4 semester program, technically you are considered an on time graduate.
    This! Thank you for an excellent post.

  • Aug 19

    We can't possibly predict the outcome of this investigation. Are you the "classmate's friend?"

  • Aug 19

    [QUOTE=OhioRN0916;9514805
    We do do not allow family members to be with patients at this point in their surgery due to HIPPA laws...[/QUOTE]


    The others have already answered your question, but this part of your post bothers me. There is no HIPAA regulation that prevents patients from having authorized loved ones present during their care. There are only healthcare providers who either fail to understand HIPAA, or who simply don't want to be bothered with visitors and invoke HIPAA improperly for their own convenience.

  • Aug 17

    Pregnancy is not your employer's business unless and until you require consideration for your or your baby's safety and well-being.

    When you reasonably anticipate the need for modifications (such as not being exposed to X-rays, chemo, or other teratogenic agents) speak confidentially to your supervisor. Until then, it is entirely your choice.

    Best of health to you!

  • Aug 13

    With all due respect, Muno, I would appreciate your not assuming that you know my family's coverage status better than I do.

    I am well aware of the coverage of our previous and current plans, and the limitations of both. Nursing has not been my only career. I have extensive professional experience related to health insurance.

    We were forced to give up an affordable catastrophic plan tailored to our family's needs, which dovetailed nicely with our savings habits,financial situation, and risk-tolerance. Since then we have had THREE different Obamacare-compliant plans, because insurers keep pulling out. This year, our 4 family members are covered by 3 different plans, since not a single option remains in our state that will provide anything other than ER care for our daughters when they are at college out of state.

    Our fixed costs (premiums, deductibles, and OOP maximums) have tripled in 3 years, while our coverage has essentially disappeared for everything but a yearly well visit per family member. (Even with very high cost estimates, that care would run us no more than a few thousand dollars per year.) So we are paying $18K per year for 4 doctor's visits. One doesn't have to be very bright to understand that is non-sensical and non-sustainable. And next year's estimates are for premiums alone to rise to $30K.

    We are reasonably well-off financially, but that will be our breaking point.

    Please, fellow posters, raise your hands if you would be willing to spend $30K to insure a married couple and one daughter, who will still need a second insurance policy to cover her at school. Keep in mind that policy will have a $15K deductible, so we will be out $45K before it covers anything beyond routine preventive healthcare. It will NOT be considered catastrophic coverage, because Obamacare won't allow that at our age, and will not be eligible for coordination with a pre-tax spending account, nor can pre-tax dollars be used to pay those astronomical premiums.

    Would you sign up for that? I don't intend to. Unlike many families, I can afford to pay tens of thousands of dollars towards my healthcare, if need be, and I am willing to do so. But I'm not willing to pay tens of thousands in premiums and then still have to pay tens of thousands for my family's care.

    While I pray for a reasonable resolution, I almost hope our state ends up without an insurer in the individual market. Then there is at least a small chance that we will once again be able to purchase truly catastrophic coverage free from the mandates and non-competitive practices that have (predictably) led to the failure of Obamacare.

    Again, I understand that precious few who are not self-employed can relate to this mess, but what is happening now in the individual market will eventually spill over into group plans, so it is in everyone's interest, regardless of the source of their insurance coverage to educate themselves to the catastrophic (no pun intended) effects of this disastrous law.

  • Aug 13

    Quote from HvnSntRN
    When I worked in Mother-Baby Care, we were not permitted to leave a drowsy mother alone with her newborn in the bed with her. If we set her up to breastfeed, we had to go in and check on them after 30 minutes. We didn't allow them to co-bed, but the baby was in a cot near the bed. We had pot lights installed above each bed so the mother could see her baby's complexion and become more easily oriented to her surroundings if she woke up (or was woken up) during the night.

    These are interesting precautions, but what would they have prevented in this situation?

    Checking on a baby every 30 minutes is about 25 minutes too long to prevent a suffocation.

    The mother in this case wasn't "co-sleeping" with her baby, she was sitting up to feed, and if she was exhausted to the point of falling asleep and smothering the child, I doubt that extra lighting would have mattered much.

    I agree this is a tragedy and my prayers are with all those suffering.

  • Aug 12

    Quote from HvnSntRN
    When I worked in Mother-Baby Care, we were not permitted to leave a drowsy mother alone with her newborn in the bed with her. If we set her up to breastfeed, we had to go in and check on them after 30 minutes. We didn't allow them to co-bed, but the baby was in a cot near the bed. We had pot lights installed above each bed so the mother could see her baby's complexion and become more easily oriented to her surroundings if she woke up (or was woken up) during the night.

    These are interesting precautions, but what would they have prevented in this situation?

    Checking on a baby every 30 minutes is about 25 minutes too long to prevent a suffocation.

    The mother in this case wasn't "co-sleeping" with her baby, she was sitting up to feed, and if she was exhausted to the point of falling asleep and smothering the child, I doubt that extra lighting would have mattered much.

    I agree this is a tragedy and my prayers are with all those suffering.

  • Aug 12

    If you are offered a position of interest to you, take it, work hard, learn all you can, and hold your head up high when and IF you are required to resign due to your husband's service to our country.

    While I don't condone people taking jobs they have no intention of sticking with, your situation is different. You are motivated to do an excellent job for your employer for the time available to you. Furthermore, you have no real knowledge of when those orders may come. The last thing you want is to decline a job offer and find out 6 months from now that your husband's superiors have decided to keep him in his present job for another year.

    Thank you for your concern for your potential employers, but no decent person in their right mind would hold a future job change against you.

  • Aug 11

    Please make an appointment with an advisor from the nursing program you wish to attend. Ask that person to help you schedule prerequisite classes and coach you on making a successful application to the nursing program when the time comes. Many programs admit students on a semi-annual or yearly basis, so not being accepted as an incoming freshman will not prevent you from being considered at other times.

    Good luck!

  • Aug 10

    Please make an appointment with an advisor from the nursing program you wish to attend. Ask that person to help you schedule prerequisite classes and coach you on making a successful application to the nursing program when the time comes. Many programs admit students on a semi-annual or yearly basis, so not being accepted as an incoming freshman will not prevent you from being considered at other times.

    Good luck!

  • Aug 10

    If you are offered a position of interest to you, take it, work hard, learn all you can, and hold your head up high when and IF you are required to resign due to your husband's service to our country.

    While I don't condone people taking jobs they have no intention of sticking with, your situation is different. You are motivated to do an excellent job for your employer for the time available to you. Furthermore, you have no real knowledge of when those orders may come. The last thing you want is to decline a job offer and find out 6 months from now that your husband's superiors have decided to keep him in his present job for another year.

    Thank you for your concern for your potential employers, but no decent person in their right mind would hold a future job change against you.

  • Aug 10

    If you are offered a position of interest to you, take it, work hard, learn all you can, and hold your head up high when and IF you are required to resign due to your husband's service to our country.

    While I don't condone people taking jobs they have no intention of sticking with, your situation is different. You are motivated to do an excellent job for your employer for the time available to you. Furthermore, you have no real knowledge of when those orders may come. The last thing you want is to decline a job offer and find out 6 months from now that your husband's superiors have decided to keep him in his present job for another year.

    Thank you for your concern for your potential employers, but no decent person in their right mind would hold a future job change against you.

  • Aug 10

    Please make an appointment with an advisor from the nursing program you wish to attend. Ask that person to help you schedule prerequisite classes and coach you on making a successful application to the nursing program when the time comes. Many programs admit students on a semi-annual or yearly basis, so not being accepted as an incoming freshman will not prevent you from being considered at other times.

    Good luck!

  • Aug 10

    If you are offered a position of interest to you, take it, work hard, learn all you can, and hold your head up high when and IF you are required to resign due to your husband's service to our country.

    While I don't condone people taking jobs they have no intention of sticking with, your situation is different. You are motivated to do an excellent job for your employer for the time available to you. Furthermore, you have no real knowledge of when those orders may come. The last thing you want is to decline a job offer and find out 6 months from now that your husband's superiors have decided to keep him in his present job for another year.

    Thank you for your concern for your potential employers, but no decent person in their right mind would hold a future job change against you.

  • Aug 10

    Please make an appointment with an advisor from the nursing program you wish to attend. Ask that person to help you schedule prerequisite classes and coach you on making a successful application to the nursing program when the time comes. Many programs admit students on a semi-annual or yearly basis, so not being accepted as an incoming freshman will not prevent you from being considered at other times.

    Good luck!


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