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Jolie 27,323 Views

Joined Oct 17, '01. Posts: 9,494 (48% Liked) Likes: 13,519

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  • Feb 28

    If you have any questions after reviewing the IDPFR website, please contact your school of nursing. At the risk of sounding like a COB, it bewilders me that colleges and universities apparently fail to prepare their graduates for basic professional tasks such as job searches, applying for NCLEX and initial licensure, meeting continuing education requirements, endorsing licenses and maintaining licenses. If this was covered, and you didn't realize that it would one day apply to you, an advisor at your school should be able and willing to guide you. If this was never covered, then shame on them!

  • Feb 27

    In our district, the nurse's decision to call 911 is respected. A call to parents follows immediately. If the parents arrive before the child is transported by EMS, they can interveve and decline the transport, assuming responsibility themselves. Unless documentation is in place in advance, grandparents can't do that. Granny's job should have been to comfort & calm the child. If she wasn't doing that, I would have sent her out of the office so I could focus my attention on the child.

  • Feb 27

    Having precepted students in the OR, I can assure you that no one expected you to be involved in patient care, but they DID expect you to be aware of safety issues. When you felt ill and woozy, it was your immediate responsibility to alert someone and/or remove yourself from the room. Remaining in the room, closing your eyes and trying to compose yourself may have resulted in you falling, fainting, vomiting or who-knows-what else, compromising safety and infection control. The last thing the OR staff needs is to be forced to attend to an observing student who failed to take responsibility for him/herself.

    Feeling ill may have been unavoidable. Remaining in the room was your choice, and it was one you should not have made. You were correctly criticized for that.

  • Feb 23

    If you have any questions after reviewing the IDPFR website, please contact your school of nursing. At the risk of sounding like a COB, it bewilders me that colleges and universities apparently fail to prepare their graduates for basic professional tasks such as job searches, applying for NCLEX and initial licensure, meeting continuing education requirements, endorsing licenses and maintaining licenses. If this was covered, and you didn't realize that it would one day apply to you, an advisor at your school should be able and willing to guide you. If this was never covered, then shame on them!

  • Feb 23

    If you have any questions after reviewing the IDPFR website, please contact your school of nursing. At the risk of sounding like a COB, it bewilders me that colleges and universities apparently fail to prepare their graduates for basic professional tasks such as job searches, applying for NCLEX and initial licensure, meeting continuing education requirements, endorsing licenses and maintaining licenses. If this was covered, and you didn't realize that it would one day apply to you, an advisor at your school should be able and willing to guide you. If this was never covered, then shame on them!

  • Feb 23

    If you have any questions after reviewing the IDPFR website, please contact your school of nursing. At the risk of sounding like a COB, it bewilders me that colleges and universities apparently fail to prepare their graduates for basic professional tasks such as job searches, applying for NCLEX and initial licensure, meeting continuing education requirements, endorsing licenses and maintaining licenses. If this was covered, and you didn't realize that it would one day apply to you, an advisor at your school should be able and willing to guide you. If this was never covered, then shame on them!

  • Feb 22

    Quote from teachable
    ...At least then there's an explanation even if their assumption about what is going on is inaccurate.

    I don't blame anyone but myself. I do think that the surgeon was a bit of a jerk insisting over and over that I handle and touch the organ just for the experience when it's clear I was trying to learn not to be woozy from the sight of surgery for the very first time ever. We hadn't even covered this material, so I didn't know what to expect.
    You state that you don't blame anyone but yourself, and in the very next sentence, you blame the surgeon for insisting that you touch a surgical specimen and for not knowing that you were woozy, even though you had not informed anyone that you felt ill, and you tried to conceal your queasiness.

    Please take responsibility for your actions, mistakes, misjudgments, etc., or you can expect next semester to follow a similar path.

    Good luck to you.

  • Feb 22

    Having precepted students in the OR, I can assure you that no one expected you to be involved in patient care, but they DID expect you to be aware of safety issues. When you felt ill and woozy, it was your immediate responsibility to alert someone and/or remove yourself from the room. Remaining in the room, closing your eyes and trying to compose yourself may have resulted in you falling, fainting, vomiting or who-knows-what else, compromising safety and infection control. The last thing the OR staff needs is to be forced to attend to an observing student who failed to take responsibility for him/herself.

    Feeling ill may have been unavoidable. Remaining in the room was your choice, and it was one you should not have made. You were correctly criticized for that.

  • Feb 22

    Quote from kgregoRN11
    Hi everybody! I have been a postpartum nurse for the past year and a half, and I absolutely love it. Not only do I love my job, but I love where I work and the people that I work with. However, I do find myself getting a little bored sometimes looking at the same old breast or perineum. I sometimes think that I am less of a nurse because I only do mother/baby nursing. I don't start IV's, take care of really sick patients, or exercise my critical care nursing skills I learned in nursing school. I mean there is the occasional PPH or PIH, or TTN in baby's, but I bascially take care of healthy patients. Does anyone else feel this way in mother/baby nursing? Should I switch positions even though I love my job to be more challenged as a nurse? Just wondering what people think...
    Please don't take my answer the wrong way. It is meant to be lighthearted, not critical.

    Just get over it!!!

    I think all nurses have the feeling at one time or another that they are "losing skills, not doing REAL nursing," etc. and it is always unjustified.

    Every area of nursing is highly specialized and requires a unique knowledge base and skill set. To believe that one area of nursing is easier or less valuable than another is to be seriously misinformed. If you need proof of that, simply ask a seasoned trauma nurse to attend a C-section and do baby care. (And watch him/her run like the wind!) Or ask a mother-baby nurse to attend to a patient experiencing a psychotic episode, and watch her bolt.

    We all have strengths, weaknesses, preferences, and experience that draw us to a certain area of care where we "fit". We best serve our patients and ourselves when we acknowledge that and choose jobs that are compatible with these characteristics. I am an excellent NICU nurse (if I do say so myself), but would make a terrible med-surg nurse, because the patient population does not interest me. I would still have a good skill set and knowledge base, but would not enjoy my job, and that would hold me back from being and doing my best.

    I had a brief crisis, believing that I was "losing my skills" about 5 years into my nursing career. It led me to take an LDRP job where I dusted off my adult assessment and patient care skills. I enjoyed it, but was still drawn back to my home in the NICU. The experience was valuable in that it gave me a better perspective on the pregnancy complications that produce NICU babies, and a better understanding of mothers' post-partum needs.

    It also didn't hurt that I left a job in a dysfunctional NICU to go to work in a very well-run LDRP. So I got the best of both worlds: a quality unit on which to work where I could expand my experience. That was much different from leaving a job that I liked to try an entirely different area of care simply to validate my worth as a nurse.

    So, my very long-winded advice to you is not to leave a job and unit you like simply to prove that you are a REAL nurse. If you truly have a strong desire to learn another area of care, then research your options and find a well-run unit on which to work and learn. It would also be a good idea to stay on prn at your current job so that if you find your new job does not meet your expectations you can go back.

  • Feb 22

    I'm glad to read a few posts reassuring you that your experience on this unit is not normal or acceptable.

    As some posters have indicated, "dark humor" is not unusual in healthcare, or any high-stress occupation. It is a coping mechanism, and as long as it is utilized in private, with trustworthy co-workers, it harms no one and serves to protect our mental health. But I don't think that is really the issue here. I think what you are overhearing represents an extremely poor attitude towards a patient population that is not respected by many of your co-workers, along with abysmal leadership that tolerates all kinds of unprofessional behavior in the name of staffing a unit with a horrible reputation that can't attract or keep quality staff.

    I can imagine that you were excited to be hired into L&D as a new grad. It represents a "dream job" that few are able to find without experience or connections. I can only imagine what you were promised in terms of orientation, mentoring and support, especially since most nursing education programs offer limited L&D clinical experience. It appears that promised training won't be forthcoming unless you clearly and firmly demand it, and even then, maybe not.

    I've been out of the hospital setting for almost 20 years, but even back in the dark ages of the 1990's, national standards of care (per NAACOG and per NRP) called for 2 fully independent RNs in the delivery room at the time of birth, one dedicated to mom one to baby. Someone will correct me if I am wrong, but I doubt that those standards have loosened with time. So, leaving you to attend a newborn by yourself was wholly inappropriate and in violation (I believe) of accepted standards of care.

    I suspect that this was not simply a matter of a single bad day of staffing, but rather a long-standing pattern of slipshod training, care and standards that is not likely improve, nor is it a setting that will ever be conducive to your learning. Please have a pointed conversation with your manager and decide for yourself if this is an environment in which you can grow.

  • Feb 22

    Having precepted students in the OR, I can assure you that no one expected you to be involved in patient care, but they DID expect you to be aware of safety issues. When you felt ill and woozy, it was your immediate responsibility to alert someone and/or remove yourself from the room. Remaining in the room, closing your eyes and trying to compose yourself may have resulted in you falling, fainting, vomiting or who-knows-what else, compromising safety and infection control. The last thing the OR staff needs is to be forced to attend to an observing student who failed to take responsibility for him/herself.

    Feeling ill may have been unavoidable. Remaining in the room was your choice, and it was one you should not have made. You were correctly criticized for that.

  • Feb 22

    Having precepted students in the OR, I can assure you that no one expected you to be involved in patient care, but they DID expect you to be aware of safety issues. When you felt ill and woozy, it was your immediate responsibility to alert someone and/or remove yourself from the room. Remaining in the room, closing your eyes and trying to compose yourself may have resulted in you falling, fainting, vomiting or who-knows-what else, compromising safety and infection control. The last thing the OR staff needs is to be forced to attend to an observing student who failed to take responsibility for him/herself.

    Feeling ill may have been unavoidable. Remaining in the room was your choice, and it was one you should not have made. You were correctly criticized for that.

  • Feb 22

    Quote from teachable
    ...At least then there's an explanation even if their assumption about what is going on is inaccurate.

    I don't blame anyone but myself. I do think that the surgeon was a bit of a jerk insisting over and over that I handle and touch the organ just for the experience when it's clear I was trying to learn not to be woozy from the sight of surgery for the very first time ever. We hadn't even covered this material, so I didn't know what to expect.
    You state that you don't blame anyone but yourself, and in the very next sentence, you blame the surgeon for insisting that you touch a surgical specimen and for not knowing that you were woozy, even though you had not informed anyone that you felt ill, and you tried to conceal your queasiness.

    Please take responsibility for your actions, mistakes, misjudgments, etc., or you can expect next semester to follow a similar path.

    Good luck to you.

  • Feb 21

    Having precepted students in the OR, I can assure you that no one expected you to be involved in patient care, but they DID expect you to be aware of safety issues. When you felt ill and woozy, it was your immediate responsibility to alert someone and/or remove yourself from the room. Remaining in the room, closing your eyes and trying to compose yourself may have resulted in you falling, fainting, vomiting or who-knows-what else, compromising safety and infection control. The last thing the OR staff needs is to be forced to attend to an observing student who failed to take responsibility for him/herself.

    Feeling ill may have been unavoidable. Remaining in the room was your choice, and it was one you should not have made. You were correctly criticized for that.

  • Feb 21

    Having precepted students in the OR, I can assure you that no one expected you to be involved in patient care, but they DID expect you to be aware of safety issues. When you felt ill and woozy, it was your immediate responsibility to alert someone and/or remove yourself from the room. Remaining in the room, closing your eyes and trying to compose yourself may have resulted in you falling, fainting, vomiting or who-knows-what else, compromising safety and infection control. The last thing the OR staff needs is to be forced to attend to an observing student who failed to take responsibility for him/herself.

    Feeling ill may have been unavoidable. Remaining in the room was your choice, and it was one you should not have made. You were correctly criticized for that.


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