Latest Likes For Jolie

Latest Likes For Jolie

Jolie 24,653 Views

Joined Oct 17, '01. Posts: 9,441 (48% Liked) Likes: 13,266

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  • Sep 21

    I agree with Kday that there is no better place to be than in the Nursery, either well-baby or NICU. What makes it so awesome is that you, the nurse, are the first person to put your hands on and assess a brand new life. You're part cheer-leader for the parents, and part detective (determining whether the baby is indeed OK). You're first assessment of the baby's health is SOOO important!

    In well-baby, you will spend most of your time teaching. That is also a critical part of NICU nursing. You'll learn some advanced skills in the NICU such as IV starts, art. sticks, blood draws, vent management, etc. There is definitely a certain satisfaction that comes with mastering these technical aspects of care, but the low-tech teaching, family support, and yes, rocking are still the best aspects of the NICU.

    Good luck to you. I hope you find what you want!

  • Sep 19

    Quote from Jen4nursing
    So I was just curious on how many nurses have left their jobs due to hostile environments and the boss fires them as soon as they put in their letter of recognition.

    I am in that boat now and I need that reference as that is my only clinical experience. How have you all dealt with bad references?

    I'd like to clarify one point: When you turned in your resignation, were you actually told that the resignation was not being accepted because you were being terminated instead, or did the supervisor accept your resignation and then say that you did not need to complete a 2 week notice but would be taken off the schedule immediately?

    These scenarios are not the same thing.

    It seems unlikely to me (although certainly not impossible) that an employer would fire someone who has attempted to formally resign. Typically a person who voluntarily resigns is NOT eligible for employer-sponsored unemployment payments, while one who is fired may be. From an employer's standpoint, this is a significant expense, and one that most attempt to avoid, if at all possible. So it doesn't make sense from the employer's standpoint to fire someone who is trying to quit, thus opening the possibility of having to pay a significant amount of money to sponsor that employee's unemployment compensation.

    When an employee turns in a resignation, it is customary to offer to work out a "notice" usually 2-4 weeks. Many employers require this for an employee to leave in "good standing" and to receive all benefits owed such as unpaid vacation time. Not all do, and some prefer to have the employee leave immediately. Accepting an employee's resignation and asking that employee to leave immediately rather than work out a 2-4 week notice is NOT the same as firing the employee.

    Whether an employee is eligible for re-hire may or may not have anything to do with how the employment was terminated. I have had to fire employees who were valued and would be willing to rehire them (needed extended LOA in excess of family and medical leave) at a later time. I have also accepted voluntary resignations from employees who were not valued and would not be eligible for rehire. (Poor clinical skills).

    I would suggest clarifying with Human Resources whether your resignation was accepted or whether you were fired. If fired, investigate filing for unemployment compensation while you continue to look for another job.

    Lastly, I agree that it is best to have not only an offer, but have worked out all details of starting a new job before resigning from the old one. Sometimes offers are rescinded due to reference checks, drug screens or even staffing changes that have nothing to do with the candidate.

    Best of luck to you.

  • Sep 19

    Quote from Jen4nursing
    So I was just curious on how many nurses have left their jobs due to hostile environments and the boss fires them as soon as they put in their letter of recognition.

    I am in that boat now and I need that reference as that is my only clinical experience. How have you all dealt with bad references?

    I'd like to clarify one point: When you turned in your resignation, were you actually told that the resignation was not being accepted because you were being terminated instead, or did the supervisor accept your resignation and then say that you did not need to complete a 2 week notice but would be taken off the schedule immediately?

    These scenarios are not the same thing.

    It seems unlikely to me (although certainly not impossible) that an employer would fire someone who has attempted to formally resign. Typically a person who voluntarily resigns is NOT eligible for employer-sponsored unemployment payments, while one who is fired may be. From an employer's standpoint, this is a significant expense, and one that most attempt to avoid, if at all possible. So it doesn't make sense from the employer's standpoint to fire someone who is trying to quit, thus opening the possibility of having to pay a significant amount of money to sponsor that employee's unemployment compensation.

    When an employee turns in a resignation, it is customary to offer to work out a "notice" usually 2-4 weeks. Many employers require this for an employee to leave in "good standing" and to receive all benefits owed such as unpaid vacation time. Not all do, and some prefer to have the employee leave immediately. Accepting an employee's resignation and asking that employee to leave immediately rather than work out a 2-4 week notice is NOT the same as firing the employee.

    Whether an employee is eligible for re-hire may or may not have anything to do with how the employment was terminated. I have had to fire employees who were valued and would be willing to rehire them (needed extended LOA in excess of family and medical leave) at a later time. I have also accepted voluntary resignations from employees who were not valued and would not be eligible for rehire. (Poor clinical skills).

    I would suggest clarifying with Human Resources whether your resignation was accepted or whether you were fired. If fired, investigate filing for unemployment compensation while you continue to look for another job.

    Lastly, I agree that it is best to have not only an offer, but have worked out all details of starting a new job before resigning from the old one. Sometimes offers are rescinded due to reference checks, drug screens or even staffing changes that have nothing to do with the candidate.

    Best of luck to you.

  • Sep 11

    I don't understand how the district can simply "release" themselves from a contractural obligation for full time, teacher-scale employment and salary, unless you agree in writing. I can understand not renewing at the end of the year, but once a contract has been signed and the year has begun, it seems like they should be required to honor it, just as they are doing for the teachers. Isn't that the purpose of a contract?

  • Sep 10

    I don't understand how the district can simply "release" themselves from a contractural obligation for full time, teacher-scale employment and salary, unless you agree in writing. I can understand not renewing at the end of the year, but once a contract has been signed and the year has begun, it seems like they should be required to honor it, just as they are doing for the teachers. Isn't that the purpose of a contract?

  • Sep 10

    I don't understand how the district can simply "release" themselves from a contractural obligation for full time, teacher-scale employment and salary, unless you agree in writing. I can understand not renewing at the end of the year, but once a contract has been signed and the year has begun, it seems like they should be required to honor it, just as they are doing for the teachers. Isn't that the purpose of a contract?

  • Sep 10

    I applaud you all for your no-tolerance stance with this serious safety problem. I had a similar situation several years back and had the principal's backing and blessing to do the same. We were over-ruled by the superintendent who would not "deny a student his right to access a free and appropriate public education!" He vehemently disagreed with our belief that it was the student and his parents who were preventing access, but needless to say, he prevailed.

    We had the student for nearly 1/2 of the school year without valid orders, supplies, or medication on hand. Calls to his mom were returned inconsistently. We had no direct contact information for his dad, and mom refused to allow direct contact with the physician's office.

    One day, purely by coincidence, Dad came to school on business completely unrelated to the student. As soon as the principal realized who he was, he gathered us all in the office to discuss the situation with his son's diabetes management. Needless to say, things got done that day.

    I can't begin to describe the relief I felt to finally not be responsible for something completely out of my control.

  • Sep 10

    At-will employment does not typically involve a contract. Please check the language of your contract regarding its termination. Most contracts spell out the circumstances under which a contract may be broken (by either employer or employee). One example would be for cause: that you have failed to perform adequately or have violated a policy such as excessive absenteeism, which clearly doesn't apply.
    A second example would be that both parties agree to the termination, which doesn't apply either. The third example would be that they have found an equivalent position for you. That may apply IF you are hired for another position within the district, but not until those details are solidified. Lastly, if the contract is terminated against your will (because of budget cuts), they may be obligated to compensate you financially. This is why it is important NOT to agree to anything until you've spoken to a legal advisor.

    Best of luck to you!

  • Sep 10

    I don't understand how the district can simply "release" themselves from a contractural obligation for full time, teacher-scale employment and salary, unless you agree in writing. I can understand not renewing at the end of the year, but once a contract has been signed and the year has begun, it seems like they should be required to honor it, just as they are doing for the teachers. Isn't that the purpose of a contract?

  • Sep 9

    I don't understand how the district can simply "release" themselves from a contractural obligation for full time, teacher-scale employment and salary, unless you agree in writing. I can understand not renewing at the end of the year, but once a contract has been signed and the year has begun, it seems like they should be required to honor it, just as they are doing for the teachers. Isn't that the purpose of a contract?

  • Sep 9

    I don't understand how the district can simply "release" themselves from a contractural obligation for full time, teacher-scale employment and salary, unless you agree in writing. I can understand not renewing at the end of the year, but once a contract has been signed and the year has begun, it seems like they should be required to honor it, just as they are doing for the teachers. Isn't that the purpose of a contract?

  • Sep 9

    I applaud you all for your no-tolerance stance with this serious safety problem. I had a similar situation several years back and had the principal's backing and blessing to do the same. We were over-ruled by the superintendent who would not "deny a student his right to access a free and appropriate public education!" He vehemently disagreed with our belief that it was the student and his parents who were preventing access, but needless to say, he prevailed.

    We had the student for nearly 1/2 of the school year without valid orders, supplies, or medication on hand. Calls to his mom were returned inconsistently. We had no direct contact information for his dad, and mom refused to allow direct contact with the physician's office.

    One day, purely by coincidence, Dad came to school on business completely unrelated to the student. As soon as the principal realized who he was, he gathered us all in the office to discuss the situation with his son's diabetes management. Needless to say, things got done that day.

    I can't begin to describe the relief I felt to finally not be responsible for something completely out of my control.

  • Sep 9

    I applaud you all for your no-tolerance stance with this serious safety problem. I had a similar situation several years back and had the principal's backing and blessing to do the same. We were over-ruled by the superintendent who would not "deny a student his right to access a free and appropriate public education!" He vehemently disagreed with our belief that it was the student and his parents who were preventing access, but needless to say, he prevailed.

    We had the student for nearly 1/2 of the school year without valid orders, supplies, or medication on hand. Calls to his mom were returned inconsistently. We had no direct contact information for his dad, and mom refused to allow direct contact with the physician's office.

    One day, purely by coincidence, Dad came to school on business completely unrelated to the student. As soon as the principal realized who he was, he gathered us all in the office to discuss the situation with his son's diabetes management. Needless to say, things got done that day.

    I can't begin to describe the relief I felt to finally not be responsible for something completely out of my control.

  • Sep 8

    I applaud you all for your no-tolerance stance with this serious safety problem. I had a similar situation several years back and had the principal's backing and blessing to do the same. We were over-ruled by the superintendent who would not "deny a student his right to access a free and appropriate public education!" He vehemently disagreed with our belief that it was the student and his parents who were preventing access, but needless to say, he prevailed.

    We had the student for nearly 1/2 of the school year without valid orders, supplies, or medication on hand. Calls to his mom were returned inconsistently. We had no direct contact information for his dad, and mom refused to allow direct contact with the physician's office.

    One day, purely by coincidence, Dad came to school on business completely unrelated to the student. As soon as the principal realized who he was, he gathered us all in the office to discuss the situation with his son's diabetes management. Needless to say, things got done that day.

    I can't begin to describe the relief I felt to finally not be responsible for something completely out of my control.

  • Sep 7

    I don't understand how the district can simply "release" themselves from a contractural obligation for full time, teacher-scale employment and salary, unless you agree in writing. I can understand not renewing at the end of the year, but once a contract has been signed and the year has begun, it seems like they should be required to honor it, just as they are doing for the teachers. Isn't that the purpose of a contract?


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