Latest Likes For Jolie

Latest Likes For Jolie

Jolie 22,668 Views

Joined Oct 17, '01. Posts: 9,425 (48% Liked) Likes: 13,200

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  • Jun 23

    With experience as a nurse manager and in Human Resources, I will tell you not to bother with your former employers. First of all, it is not a priority for them and they are not likly to respond to your request in a timely manner. Secondly, it is highly unlikely they have the certificates you need.

    I was responsible for maintaining records for my unit staff verifying that they were current on BLS, NRP, ACLS state licensure and other hospital required yearly courses. I maintained records of the expiration dates of their "competencies" but did not keep CEU certificates for the same reason that the BON doesn't want them...I would have drowned in paper. It was the employees' responsibility to maintain their own file to be produced (to me or to the BON) upon request.

    Be prepared for a license suspension until the CEUs are complete, as well as a fine an possible monitoring of your license in the future.

  • Jun 23

    With experience as a nurse manager and in Human Resources, I will tell you not to bother with your former employers. First of all, it is not a priority for them and they are not likly to respond to your request in a timely manner. Secondly, it is highly unlikely they have the certificates you need.

    I was responsible for maintaining records for my unit staff verifying that they were current on BLS, NRP, ACLS state licensure and other hospital required yearly courses. I maintained records of the expiration dates of their "competencies" but did not keep CEU certificates for the same reason that the BON doesn't want them...I would have drowned in paper. It was the employees' responsibility to maintain their own file to be produced (to me or to the BON) upon request.

    Be prepared for a license suspension until the CEUs are complete, as well as a fine an possible monitoring of your license in the future.

  • Jun 23

    I encourage you to consider that providing supplemental oxygen in and of itself will not reduce the baby's work of breathing.

    Grunting, retracting and nasal flaring are all indicators that an infant is working too hard to move air in and out of the lungs. While the oxygen saturation may temporarily hold in the "OK" range of 93-95%, the baby is likely to decompensate and supplemental oxygen alone won't be sufficient to rescue the baby at that point.

    The least invasive means of supporting a baby who is working hard to breathe is prone positioning with the head of bed elevated. Bracing the sternum and ribcage against a firm mattress lessens the work of breathing, and may buy you time to set up a high flow cannula or CPAP at the bedside. It is best to intervene with these measures before the baby is completely exhausted and needs intubation and ventilation.

  • Jun 23

    I encourage you to consider that providing supplemental oxygen in and of itself will not reduce the baby's work of breathing.

    Grunting, retracting and nasal flaring are all indicators that an infant is working too hard to move air in and out of the lungs. While the oxygen saturation may temporarily hold in the "OK" range of 93-95%, the baby is likely to decompensate and supplemental oxygen alone won't be sufficient to rescue the baby at that point.

    The least invasive means of supporting a baby who is working hard to breathe is prone positioning with the head of bed elevated. Bracing the sternum and ribcage against a firm mattress lessens the work of breathing, and may buy you time to set up a high flow cannula or CPAP at the bedside. It is best to intervene with these measures before the baby is completely exhausted and needs intubation and ventilation.

  • Jun 21

    I encourage you to consider that providing supplemental oxygen in and of itself will not reduce the baby's work of breathing.

    Grunting, retracting and nasal flaring are all indicators that an infant is working too hard to move air in and out of the lungs. While the oxygen saturation may temporarily hold in the "OK" range of 93-95%, the baby is likely to decompensate and supplemental oxygen alone won't be sufficient to rescue the baby at that point.

    The least invasive means of supporting a baby who is working hard to breathe is prone positioning with the head of bed elevated. Bracing the sternum and ribcage against a firm mattress lessens the work of breathing, and may buy you time to set up a high flow cannula or CPAP at the bedside. It is best to intervene with these measures before the baby is completely exhausted and needs intubation and ventilation.

  • Jun 17

    I'm not looking to excuse anyone who may have failed to follow basic safety guidelines, or nail anyone who played no role in this terrible mistake. But if 30 years of nursing have taught me nothing else, they have taught me that catastrophic errors are rarely, if ever, singly the fault of the poor soul who happens to be the last link in the chain of care delivery.

    We know very little, but I highly doubt that 2 credentialed nurses could possible read a blood bag together and fail to notice that the name, patient ID, room #, blood type and Rh, ordering physician, etc. were incorrect. This makes me wonder if multiple units were sent to the same nursing station at the same time, checked, then inadvertently switched. Or whether there may have been a labeling error. Or a mix-up in the pre-transfusion labwork that improperly identified the patient's blood type. Or two patients with the same name, or, or or any of a thousand possible scenarios.

    My heartfelt prayers to the patient, family and staff.

    A sober reminder of the possible complications of treatments we may take too much for granted.

  • May 25

    Were you upfront with your manager when you interviewed for your position? Did she know that you were transferring with the intention of gaining enough experience to apply to school, or did she believe that you had a long-term interest in the unit?

    If the former is the case, go ahead and ask for the recommendation. If the latter is the case, go ahead and ask, but don't be surprised if you get a less-than-glowing reaction and recommendation.

  • May 5

    What do your state and school district allow to be dispensed without a provider's order and/or parental consent? Makes no sense to keep anything on hand in a classroom that might lead to compliance issues with the regulations that guide your practice as well as policy and procedure.

    Vinyl gloves. Soap. Water. Bandaids. Maybe individual packets of petroleum jelly.

    Anything else will probably cause more trouble than it's worth.

  • May 3

    Tell them they can have their ammonia inhalers when they stop ostracizing kids from school for a single nit.

    You'll need them for the increased incidence of fainting

    Honestly, I've never used one. Do they really work?

  • May 3

    Tell them they can have their ammonia inhalers when they stop ostracizing kids from school for a single nit.

    You'll need them for the increased incidence of fainting

    Honestly, I've never used one. Do they really work?

  • May 3

    What do your state and school district allow to be dispensed without a provider's order and/or parental consent? Makes no sense to keep anything on hand in a classroom that might lead to compliance issues with the regulations that guide your practice as well as policy and procedure.

    Vinyl gloves. Soap. Water. Bandaids. Maybe individual packets of petroleum jelly.

    Anything else will probably cause more trouble than it's worth.

  • May 2

    Quote from Farawyn
    They do. They are magic.
    On the fainter or the lice? Maybe we're on to something

  • May 2

    Tell them they can have their ammonia inhalers when they stop ostracizing kids from school for a single nit.

    You'll need them for the increased incidence of fainting

    Honestly, I've never used one. Do they really work?

  • May 2

    Quote from Farawyn
    They do. They are magic.
    On the fainter or the lice? Maybe we're on to something

  • May 2

    Quote from Farawyn
    They do. They are magic.
    On the fainter or the lice? Maybe we're on to something


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