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Jolie 28,865 Views

Joined Oct 17, '01. Posts: 9,537 (48% Liked) Likes: 13,756

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  • 8:42 pm

    Quote from JKL33
    Jolie,

    What would you have liked them to do? I note your bias for allowing written work and reading, so long as it isn't on a phone.

    Let's be specific here. In a dark room on the night shift, what is acceptable? So far I'm hearing that using a small light in order to read a book-not-on-phone is okay. Anything else?

    What did the staffing agency sitters do that you approved of?

    We're not talking about anyone lying down on a bench. We're talking about what a good employee should do in a dark, quiet room in the night, when s/he needs to stay awake/alert.
    In my opinion, work-related tasks are fine. Paperwork, reading, policy & procedure review, use of a laptop or tablet to do continuing education or on-line coursework, etc. Having a beverage and/or snack is fine too, if it is possible for the staff member to consume it without placing his/her own health at risk (a clean place to eat without threat of infection control issues.) I also believe it is imperative that the other staff members on the unit offer frequent breaks, or at least pop their heads in the room to check on the sitter. My sister and I were more than willing to cover for breaks, but hospital policy did not allow it, which I do understand. I guess my point is that the sitter is working and needs to conduct him/herself in a professional manner, despite being confined for long periods in a single room. Scrolling on one's phone is not considered professional in the patient-care setting, and I don't see this as an exception.

    We had some wonderful sitters and some lousy ones, which undoubtedly is typical. The first 48 hours or so were difficult for our loved one who was experiencing delirium and trying to climb out of bed, pull out lines, etc. We were genuinely concerned for safety, fearing a fall. I am not a physically large person, nor do I have experience working with confused adults. There were times when I had to raise my voice to get the sitter's attention as my loved one was climbing over the bedrails and I couldn't keep her in bed myself. Once the sitter appeared to be sleeping. Once she was so engrossed in her phone that she didn't notice what was going on right in front of her, or was simply trying to ignore the situation and leave me to handle it. Hours passed without seeing a nurse, I think in large part because they assumed the sitter had the situation handled. When I requested a visit with the nursing supervisor at 0230, I was met with attitude. You asked what the "good sitters" did. In a word, they did their jobs. They interacted with our loved one. Talked calmly to her. Tried to distract her. Were on their feet when she was trying to get out of bed or trying to pull on lines. Spoke to us and offered their suggestions of how we could be helpful. Communicated with the staff when warranted to ask for additional assistance, evaluation by the nurse, etc. The sitters who worked really hard on our loved one's behalf were almost all agency staff. The ones who presented themselves poorly and did little other than take up space were hospital employees. It left us with the impression that "sitter" was a code for "night off with pay."

    Perhaps this is a little too fresh in my mind for me to be objective. The care at this Big City Magnet Medical Center left much to be desired.

    But old-fashioned as I may be, it seems that during an 8 hour shift (sitters were limited to 8 hours at this facility), it is not too much to ask a direct caregiver to keep his/her phone away from a patient's bedside.

  • 6:18 pm

    Quote from JKL33
    Jolie,

    What would you have liked them to do? I note your bias for allowing written work and reading, so long as it isn't on a phone.

    Let's be specific here. In a dark room on the night shift, what is acceptable? So far I'm hearing that using a small light in order to read a book-not-on-phone is okay. Anything else?

    What did the staffing agency sitters do that you approved of?

    We're not talking about anyone lying down on a bench. We're talking about what a good employee should do in a dark, quiet room in the night, when s/he needs to stay awake/alert.
    In my opinion, work-related tasks are fine. Paperwork, reading, policy & procedure review, use of a laptop or tablet to do continuing education or on-line coursework, etc. Having a beverage and/or snack is fine too, if it is possible for the staff member to consume it without placing his/her own health at risk (a clean place to eat without threat of infection control issues.) I also believe it is imperative that the other staff members on the unit offer frequent breaks, or at least pop their heads in the room to check on the sitter. My sister and I were more than willing to cover for breaks, but hospital policy did not allow it, which I do understand. I guess my point is that the sitter is working and needs to conduct him/herself in a professional manner, despite being confined for long periods in a single room. Scrolling on one's phone is not considered professional in the patient-care setting, and I don't see this as an exception.

    We had some wonderful sitters and some lousy ones, which undoubtedly is typical. The first 48 hours or so were difficult for our loved one who was experiencing delirium and trying to climb out of bed, pull out lines, etc. We were genuinely concerned for safety, fearing a fall. I am not a physically large person, nor do I have experience working with confused adults. There were times when I had to raise my voice to get the sitter's attention as my loved one was climbing over the bedrails and I couldn't keep her in bed myself. Once the sitter appeared to be sleeping. Once she was so engrossed in her phone that she didn't notice what was going on right in front of her, or was simply trying to ignore the situation and leave me to handle it. Hours passed without seeing a nurse, I think in large part because they assumed the sitter had the situation handled. When I requested a visit with the nursing supervisor at 0230, I was met with attitude. You asked what the "good sitters" did. In a word, they did their jobs. They interacted with our loved one. Talked calmly to her. Tried to distract her. Were on their feet when she was trying to get out of bed or trying to pull on lines. Spoke to us and offered their suggestions of how we could be helpful. Communicated with the staff when warranted to ask for additional assistance, evaluation by the nurse, etc. The sitters who worked really hard on our loved one's behalf were almost all agency staff. The ones who presented themselves poorly and did little other than take up space were hospital employees. It left us with the impression that "sitter" was a code for "night off with pay."

    Perhaps this is a little too fresh in my mind for me to be objective. The care at this Big City Magnet Medical Center left much to be desired.

    But old-fashioned as I may be, it seems that during an 8 hour shift (sitters were limited to 8 hours at this facility), it is not too much to ask a direct caregiver to keep his/her phone away from a patient's bedside.

  • Jun 21

    Quote from JKL33
    Jolie,

    What would you have liked them to do? I note your bias for allowing written work and reading, so long as it isn't on a phone.

    Let's be specific here. In a dark room on the night shift, what is acceptable? So far I'm hearing that using a small light in order to read a book-not-on-phone is okay. Anything else?

    What did the staffing agency sitters do that you approved of?

    We're not talking about anyone lying down on a bench. We're talking about what a good employee should do in a dark, quiet room in the night, when s/he needs to stay awake/alert.
    In my opinion, work-related tasks are fine. Paperwork, reading, policy & procedure review, use of a laptop or tablet to do continuing education or on-line coursework, etc. Having a beverage and/or snack is fine too, if it is possible for the staff member to consume it without placing his/her own health at risk (a clean place to eat without threat of infection control issues.) I also believe it is imperative that the other staff members on the unit offer frequent breaks, or at least pop their heads in the room to check on the sitter. My sister and I were more than willing to cover for breaks, but hospital policy did not allow it, which I do understand. I guess my point is that the sitter is working and needs to conduct him/herself in a professional manner, despite being confined for long periods in a single room. Scrolling on one's phone is not considered professional in the patient-care setting, and I don't see this as an exception.

    We had some wonderful sitters and some lousy ones, which undoubtedly is typical. The first 48 hours or so were difficult for our loved one who was experiencing delirium and trying to climb out of bed, pull out lines, etc. We were genuinely concerned for safety, fearing a fall. I am not a physically large person, nor do I have experience working with confused adults. There were times when I had to raise my voice to get the sitter's attention as my loved one was climbing over the bedrails and I couldn't keep her in bed myself. Once the sitter appeared to be sleeping. Once she was so engrossed in her phone that she didn't notice what was going on right in front of her, or was simply trying to ignore the situation and leave me to handle it. Hours passed without seeing a nurse, I think in large part because they assumed the sitter had the situation handled. When I requested a visit with the nursing supervisor at 0230, I was met with attitude. You asked what the "good sitters" did. In a word, they did their jobs. They interacted with our loved one. Talked calmly to her. Tried to distract her. Were on their feet when she was trying to get out of bed or trying to pull on lines. Spoke to us and offered their suggestions of how we could be helpful. Communicated with the staff when warranted to ask for additional assistance, evaluation by the nurse, etc. The sitters who worked really hard on our loved one's behalf were almost all agency staff. The ones who presented themselves poorly and did little other than take up space were hospital employees. It left us with the impression that "sitter" was a code for "night off with pay."

    Perhaps this is a little too fresh in my mind for me to be objective. The care at this Big City Magnet Medical Center left much to be desired.

    But old-fashioned as I may be, it seems that during an 8 hour shift (sitters were limited to 8 hours at this facility), it is not too much to ask a direct caregiver to keep his/her phone away from a patient's bedside.

  • Jun 21

    Having recently been at the bedside of a family member requiring 1:1 sitter care for safety, I agree with Beth's response above.

    The appearance of a staff member assigned to the bedside being on his/her phone leaves a poor impression on the family members and others involved in the patient's care. Despite knowing that I am a nurse and my sister is a physician, and that one or the other of us was present 100% of the time, we were informed that a staff member had to be there as well. I certainly understand the legalities of that, but to say that it's necessary and then allow that person to be distracted by a phone seemed contradictory and unprofessional. We also noted that some sitters laid down on a bench in the room, making no effort to even appear alert or awake.

    I understand how difficult and fatiguing it is to be in constant attendance at the bedside. Frequent breaks are needed for the sitter, and there should be allowances made for written work, reading, etc. While our loved one needed a darkened, restful environment, it was possible for us to use a small, focused light to read and work that didn't shine on our loved one's eyes. The same would have worked for the sitters. Ironically, in our experience, the sitters who were staff members were the "worst offenders." Those that came from an outside staffing agency conducted themselves in a professional manner.

  • Jun 18

    Quote from Brady29
    That's what I don't understand. This facility disposes of meds that were not given.

    That's not right. As a previous poster mentioned, meds can be repackaged. To discard a perfectly usable dose of medication simply because it wasn't given in "order" is to show a total lack of regard for patients' financial rights.

  • Jun 18

    Quote from Brady29
    That's what I don't understand. This facility disposes of meds that were not given.

    That's not right. As a previous poster mentioned, meds can be repackaged. To discard a perfectly usable dose of medication simply because it wasn't given in "order" is to show a total lack of regard for patients' financial rights.

  • Jun 18

    Quote from JKL33
    Jolie,

    What would you have liked them to do? I note your bias for allowing written work and reading, so long as it isn't on a phone.

    Let's be specific here. In a dark room on the night shift, what is acceptable? So far I'm hearing that using a small light in order to read a book-not-on-phone is okay. Anything else?

    What did the staffing agency sitters do that you approved of?

    We're not talking about anyone lying down on a bench. We're talking about what a good employee should do in a dark, quiet room in the night, when s/he needs to stay awake/alert.
    In my opinion, work-related tasks are fine. Paperwork, reading, policy & procedure review, use of a laptop or tablet to do continuing education or on-line coursework, etc. Having a beverage and/or snack is fine too, if it is possible for the staff member to consume it without placing his/her own health at risk (a clean place to eat without threat of infection control issues.) I also believe it is imperative that the other staff members on the unit offer frequent breaks, or at least pop their heads in the room to check on the sitter. My sister and I were more than willing to cover for breaks, but hospital policy did not allow it, which I do understand. I guess my point is that the sitter is working and needs to conduct him/herself in a professional manner, despite being confined for long periods in a single room. Scrolling on one's phone is not considered professional in the patient-care setting, and I don't see this as an exception.

    We had some wonderful sitters and some lousy ones, which undoubtedly is typical. The first 48 hours or so were difficult for our loved one who was experiencing delirium and trying to climb out of bed, pull out lines, etc. We were genuinely concerned for safety, fearing a fall. I am not a physically large person, nor do I have experience working with confused adults. There were times when I had to raise my voice to get the sitter's attention as my loved one was climbing over the bedrails and I couldn't keep her in bed myself. Once the sitter appeared to be sleeping. Once she was so engrossed in her phone that she didn't notice what was going on right in front of her, or was simply trying to ignore the situation and leave me to handle it. Hours passed without seeing a nurse, I think in large part because they assumed the sitter had the situation handled. When I requested a visit with the nursing supervisor at 0230, I was met with attitude. You asked what the "good sitters" did. In a word, they did their jobs. They interacted with our loved one. Talked calmly to her. Tried to distract her. Were on their feet when she was trying to get out of bed or trying to pull on lines. Spoke to us and offered their suggestions of how we could be helpful. Communicated with the staff when warranted to ask for additional assistance, evaluation by the nurse, etc. The sitters who worked really hard on our loved one's behalf were almost all agency staff. The ones who presented themselves poorly and did little other than take up space were hospital employees. It left us with the impression that "sitter" was a code for "night off with pay."

    Perhaps this is a little too fresh in my mind for me to be objective. The care at this Big City Magnet Medical Center left much to be desired.

    But old-fashioned as I may be, it seems that during an 8 hour shift (sitters were limited to 8 hours at this facility), it is not too much to ask a direct caregiver to keep his/her phone away from a patient's bedside.

  • Jun 18

    Quote from Brady29
    That's what I don't understand. This facility disposes of meds that were not given.

    That's not right. As a previous poster mentioned, meds can be repackaged. To discard a perfectly usable dose of medication simply because it wasn't given in "order" is to show a total lack of regard for patients' financial rights.

  • Jun 16

    Quote from JKL33
    Jolie,

    What would you have liked them to do? I note your bias for allowing written work and reading, so long as it isn't on a phone.

    Let's be specific here. In a dark room on the night shift, what is acceptable? So far I'm hearing that using a small light in order to read a book-not-on-phone is okay. Anything else?

    What did the staffing agency sitters do that you approved of?

    We're not talking about anyone lying down on a bench. We're talking about what a good employee should do in a dark, quiet room in the night, when s/he needs to stay awake/alert.
    In my opinion, work-related tasks are fine. Paperwork, reading, policy & procedure review, use of a laptop or tablet to do continuing education or on-line coursework, etc. Having a beverage and/or snack is fine too, if it is possible for the staff member to consume it without placing his/her own health at risk (a clean place to eat without threat of infection control issues.) I also believe it is imperative that the other staff members on the unit offer frequent breaks, or at least pop their heads in the room to check on the sitter. My sister and I were more than willing to cover for breaks, but hospital policy did not allow it, which I do understand. I guess my point is that the sitter is working and needs to conduct him/herself in a professional manner, despite being confined for long periods in a single room. Scrolling on one's phone is not considered professional in the patient-care setting, and I don't see this as an exception.

    We had some wonderful sitters and some lousy ones, which undoubtedly is typical. The first 48 hours or so were difficult for our loved one who was experiencing delirium and trying to climb out of bed, pull out lines, etc. We were genuinely concerned for safety, fearing a fall. I am not a physically large person, nor do I have experience working with confused adults. There were times when I had to raise my voice to get the sitter's attention as my loved one was climbing over the bedrails and I couldn't keep her in bed myself. Once the sitter appeared to be sleeping. Once she was so engrossed in her phone that she didn't notice what was going on right in front of her, or was simply trying to ignore the situation and leave me to handle it. Hours passed without seeing a nurse, I think in large part because they assumed the sitter had the situation handled. When I requested a visit with the nursing supervisor at 0230, I was met with attitude. You asked what the "good sitters" did. In a word, they did their jobs. They interacted with our loved one. Talked calmly to her. Tried to distract her. Were on their feet when she was trying to get out of bed or trying to pull on lines. Spoke to us and offered their suggestions of how we could be helpful. Communicated with the staff when warranted to ask for additional assistance, evaluation by the nurse, etc. The sitters who worked really hard on our loved one's behalf were almost all agency staff. The ones who presented themselves poorly and did little other than take up space were hospital employees. It left us with the impression that "sitter" was a code for "night off with pay."

    Perhaps this is a little too fresh in my mind for me to be objective. The care at this Big City Magnet Medical Center left much to be desired.

    But old-fashioned as I may be, it seems that during an 8 hour shift (sitters were limited to 8 hours at this facility), it is not too much to ask a direct caregiver to keep his/her phone away from a patient's bedside.

  • Jun 15

    You have been "awarded" a $4K subsidized loan for the upcoming semester and need $7.5K more. That 's $11,500 in loans for one semester of school. At that rate, you may owe as much as $50,000 by the time you graduate. That's just not reasonable, based upon job prospects, earning potential, cost of living and desired lifestyle upon graduation. Ask your school for a 1-2 year deferral of enrollment and get busy paying your debt from your first degree and saving towards your next one.

    Otherwise, in 2-3 years, we can expect you to post about how you were forced to take a job you didn't want because you had massive student loan payments to make, and now are overwhelmed by a terrible work environment, living in a crummy apartment to save on rent, driving an unreliable, unsafe car because you can't afford a new one, and you would like to start a family, but don't know if this is a good time to do so.

    We read posts like this every day. Please don't be the next one.

  • Jun 15

    I won't attempt to answer your question, because like the posters before me, I simply can't.

    Congratulations on your accomplishments, and my heartfelt best wishes that you and your boyfriend are able to work together to overcome the challenges in your relationship.

    Not to be negative, but to be realistic: This is only the beginning. When you graduate, there will be a new set of challenges: NCLEX, job search, adapting to the full-time workplace, changes in childcare needs, financial and housing decisions, etc. Please anticipate these, and work to find healthy ways to address them, possibly via counseling.

    My very best to you.

  • Jun 15

    While your presence on the BON website may never die, you can excuse yourself from the professional duties of an RN simply by not working in nursing.

    Many states' mandatory reporting laws apply to circumstances you encounter in the course of your professional duties, not your everyday life. While I would advise you to familiarize yourself with your state's requirements, there is a good chance that simply not working as an RN (regardless of whether your license is active or not) would eliminate your legal obligation to report suspected abuse/neglect. NOTE: I am not commenting on the ethical or moral aspect of this, only your legal obligation.

    Some states mandate all competent adult citizens to report suspicions of abuse/neglect. If you live in one of these states, your obligation exists whether you are a nurse or not, so giving up your livelihood would not remove this legal obligation.

    Some states require continuing education and/or current work hours for license renewal. If you choose not to comply, you would simply make your license inactive at the next renewal period.

    Other than having your name on the BON website and complying with mandatory reporting laws, I am not aware of any burdensome professional obligations that would justify surrendering a license in good standing. Can you share exactly what you mean?

  • Jun 15

    I won't attempt to answer your question, because like the posters before me, I simply can't.

    Congratulations on your accomplishments, and my heartfelt best wishes that you and your boyfriend are able to work together to overcome the challenges in your relationship.

    Not to be negative, but to be realistic: This is only the beginning. When you graduate, there will be a new set of challenges: NCLEX, job search, adapting to the full-time workplace, changes in childcare needs, financial and housing decisions, etc. Please anticipate these, and work to find healthy ways to address them, possibly via counseling.

    My very best to you.

  • Jun 14

    Quote from JKL33
    Jolie,

    What would you have liked them to do? I note your bias for allowing written work and reading, so long as it isn't on a phone.

    Let's be specific here. In a dark room on the night shift, what is acceptable? So far I'm hearing that using a small light in order to read a book-not-on-phone is okay. Anything else?

    What did the staffing agency sitters do that you approved of?

    We're not talking about anyone lying down on a bench. We're talking about what a good employee should do in a dark, quiet room in the night, when s/he needs to stay awake/alert.
    In my opinion, work-related tasks are fine. Paperwork, reading, policy & procedure review, use of a laptop or tablet to do continuing education or on-line coursework, etc. Having a beverage and/or snack is fine too, if it is possible for the staff member to consume it without placing his/her own health at risk (a clean place to eat without threat of infection control issues.) I also believe it is imperative that the other staff members on the unit offer frequent breaks, or at least pop their heads in the room to check on the sitter. My sister and I were more than willing to cover for breaks, but hospital policy did not allow it, which I do understand. I guess my point is that the sitter is working and needs to conduct him/herself in a professional manner, despite being confined for long periods in a single room. Scrolling on one's phone is not considered professional in the patient-care setting, and I don't see this as an exception.

    We had some wonderful sitters and some lousy ones, which undoubtedly is typical. The first 48 hours or so were difficult for our loved one who was experiencing delirium and trying to climb out of bed, pull out lines, etc. We were genuinely concerned for safety, fearing a fall. I am not a physically large person, nor do I have experience working with confused adults. There were times when I had to raise my voice to get the sitter's attention as my loved one was climbing over the bedrails and I couldn't keep her in bed myself. Once the sitter appeared to be sleeping. Once she was so engrossed in her phone that she didn't notice what was going on right in front of her, or was simply trying to ignore the situation and leave me to handle it. Hours passed without seeing a nurse, I think in large part because they assumed the sitter had the situation handled. When I requested a visit with the nursing supervisor at 0230, I was met with attitude. You asked what the "good sitters" did. In a word, they did their jobs. They interacted with our loved one. Talked calmly to her. Tried to distract her. Were on their feet when she was trying to get out of bed or trying to pull on lines. Spoke to us and offered their suggestions of how we could be helpful. Communicated with the staff when warranted to ask for additional assistance, evaluation by the nurse, etc. The sitters who worked really hard on our loved one's behalf were almost all agency staff. The ones who presented themselves poorly and did little other than take up space were hospital employees. It left us with the impression that "sitter" was a code for "night off with pay."

    Perhaps this is a little too fresh in my mind for me to be objective. The care at this Big City Magnet Medical Center left much to be desired.

    But old-fashioned as I may be, it seems that during an 8 hour shift (sitters were limited to 8 hours at this facility), it is not too much to ask a direct caregiver to keep his/her phone away from a patient's bedside.

  • Jun 14

    Having recently been at the bedside of a family member requiring 1:1 sitter care for safety, I agree with Beth's response above.

    The appearance of a staff member assigned to the bedside being on his/her phone leaves a poor impression on the family members and others involved in the patient's care. Despite knowing that I am a nurse and my sister is a physician, and that one or the other of us was present 100% of the time, we were informed that a staff member had to be there as well. I certainly understand the legalities of that, but to say that it's necessary and then allow that person to be distracted by a phone seemed contradictory and unprofessional. We also noted that some sitters laid down on a bench in the room, making no effort to even appear alert or awake.

    I understand how difficult and fatiguing it is to be in constant attendance at the bedside. Frequent breaks are needed for the sitter, and there should be allowances made for written work, reading, etc. While our loved one needed a darkened, restful environment, it was possible for us to use a small, focused light to read and work that didn't shine on our loved one's eyes. The same would have worked for the sitters. Ironically, in our experience, the sitters who were staff members were the "worst offenders." Those that came from an outside staffing agency conducted themselves in a professional manner.


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