Latest Comments by coff51

coff51 865 Views

Joined: Sep 27, '01; Posts: 8 (0% Liked)

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    If the aide had refused to accept every assignment that was unsafe--she'd never work. Mind you a written statement that acknowledges that fact and states she's taking the assignment against her better judgement may cover her in the event of problems. IF superiors are notified of her reluctance to take the load. But even that gets old, to keep documenting and have it thrown into a file soon forgotten. I still say that the administrations only understand $$$ in their wallets--and if it means cutting corners in patient care or sending an overworked aide up the river to save their necks, they'll do it. Besides, they've got the insurance companies in their back pocket also, to provide them w/ plenty of clients who may be aware of the situation, but are restricted from their policies to go anywhere else! Oh, Grandma, it's not what it used to be...

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    This story is totally sad and totally unfair to be sure--but then I'm told that if life was fair, Elvis would be alive and all the impersonators would be dead... We continue to witness these horror stories and see the real culprits-- the administrations, the powers that be -- get away with MURDER ! The blame continues to be shifted by them to the unwary, the dedicated, and the helpless. Then when the inevitable finally does occur, they certainly don't have any support for these "criminals" whose only crime was trying to do too much for too many. The answer?? Regrettably, there is none. Not while the CEO's/Administrative gurus have the deadly combination of unregulated money income and no conscience or compassion for the sick and the weak. We have to continue to be vigilant in watching our backs---and when we get past petty differences and competitiveness---watch each others.

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    jfpru---oncology is a most rewarding and bittersweet experience, but do be aware that it has the pitfalls and drawbacks to many nurses that don't ,---through no one's fault, mind you--- possess that particular kind of fortitude to withstand the sadness and grief that is enevitable when those patients become so close, like other family members. I left our AIC - ambulatory infusion center after 4 years when depression took the best of me. I'm thankfull for the things I learned, the friends I met, the co-workers and staff, but I realize now how ill-suited I was for that position. If you're someone whose alphabet begins w/ "P", for Perfection--- know that oncology teaches you in a very basic, human way of how very imperfect this life for some people, and that every patient brings w/ them a spouse, children, parents, etc.--or worse sometimes no one at all. Not to mention, they got younger and younger as I didn't. But they touch your life like no one else can, and linger in your memory long past the time of their last visit. Now, I worked w/ many doctors and nurses that coped with all that magnificently, they were godsends to the patients and everyone around them--including me. Thank God that we, as a professional group have so many different avenues of nursing that we can choose from,we don't have to feel discouraged or guilty that you can't excel in them all... and you won't know until you try... You just may be the one they need.... kathye

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    I'm certainly aware of the backbiting and illspiritedness among us---a profession that tends to eat their young. Yikes! I also realize that supervisors are urged, nay, required to write up very innocuous events that have nothing to do w/ your expertise or conduct.(i.e. parking in the visitor parking lot in order to get to started on time --to which i'd reply "make sure the spelling is right:C-O F-F-...... " or reminders of suspension risks for coming in late "well, how many times would I have to be late to get FIVE days off? I'd really like to have quality time w/ my family..."--- the way I saw it, I'd be happy to get any extra hands to work even 1/2 hour late...) I know we all have work to do and could pass up these little tete' a tete's @ change of shift. , but just experience the support and cooperation you get from that aide or collegue that serves as your extra ears, eyes and hands, when you express recognition of their job well done. It's contagious, not achieved overnite- but neither is the bitterness that breeds bitterness. Oh, and one more thing...please don't leave your sense of humor @ home!! thanks for the rant...kathye

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    Twenty-six years ago the head nurse explained to us "new recruits" that incident reports were a learning tool to help weed out bad habits or bring to your attention something that shouldnt happen again. And truth be known , used in that way was a very effective device---once you were confronted in that way, you'd tend to remember not to do THAT again. But what really balanced it all out was, she encouraged us - more importantly- to write up our fellow workers for some of the wonderful "above-and-beyond-the-call-of-duty" things that so many of us do everyday, which usually go undocumented and forgotten. Positive reinforcement of outstanding work yeilds more of the same, whether the group is made up of children, plumbers or nurses. Not to mention an enhanced feeling of comaraderie and friendlier atmosphere on the division. I can truthfully say that I loved my job all those years. NURSING, ya gotta love it.

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    nrskarenrn--- thanx for the article AND unwritten reminder that we must take care of ourselves ---that suffering in silence is surely not in one's best interest . we must keep chipping away at the wrongful claim and stigma that seeking help for our most precious commodity, our MIND---- since oftentimes that is all we are left with in the late autumn of ou lives--- should not be seen as a WEAKNESS, but as taking good care of our mental health in much the same way that we regard our headaches, gall bladders,insulin requirements and other physical diagnoses... surely we realize that in modern life it is tough enough to keep our serotonin receptors in tip top shape. but with an insult such as this ---of such massive proportions---its very diffcult to stay on top of our game without some well deserved attention being payed to our psyche. much can be said for the certain advances the psych field in the last 30 yrs. and if you think you're immune to emotional upsets---maybe you're the exact client that would be ever so surprised at what modern treatment---medicine or not--- could enable you to conquer and thus be an ever so valuable support person for your loved ones and strangers waiting to benefit from your healthy attitudes and total regard for all our body systems---seen---and unseen. PEACE....

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    Gee...you know we let terrorism attack our embassies in Africa...then the S.S. Cole... all with many lives being lost...these people don't understand anything but violence, there is no bargaining with them. How long will it take us to give them a hint??



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