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Emergency RN, BSN, RN, EMT-B 7,091 Views

Joined May 24, '06. Posts: 570 (65% Liked) Likes: 1,897

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  • Jul 12

    not responding in particular to this op's question, but wanted everyone to note this other case, in which a psychiatric patient was sentenced to five years for assaulting a nurse and giving her serious injury:

    http://www.timesunion.com/local/arti...aw-2251960.php

    typically, if it would have been a police officer, the patient would have been arrested for attempted murder (as had happened in other cases in the past), as he bit and his saliva could have potentially carried the aids virus.

    nurses have traditionally been used as various forms of punching bags, and the usual reaction from employers is to shrug and say "so what?" nurses and nursing needs to get together to help defend ourselves, both legally and physically, even as we're doing our jobs. hospital systems have to wake up to their legal responsibility to employee safety under osha.

    imho, once a patient attacks someone, then continue to treat them, but change their status to "prisoner" with police in attendance. then, once they're medically stable for discharge, they should be transported into and processed by the criminal justice system.

    large hospitals deal with police prisoners all the time. having a patient become one in the midst of his admission isn't so strange. in large cities like new york city, there are what are known as "prisoner wards" which are locked facilities like a psych unit, with corrections officers always in attendance.

    we as a society have to realize that crime and criminality does not stop when the criminal gets a cold. to ignore that facet of their life begets danger not just to nurses, but to society in general.

    support your nursing unions!

  • Jan 31

    Doing it by only working 3 x 12 hour shifts per week, with 6 weeks annual vacation (BSN, 26 years exp, nights); but unfortunately live in bleed through the nose (tax and expenses) New York. If I moved to Texas, I would make ~ 43K but actually have a (calculated) 16% increase in my standard of living.

    So it really isn't all just dollars and cents.

  • Jan 25

    I find it stunningly ironic, that a nurse who makes a living undermining the livelihood efforts of other nurses, is here asking for advice in how to obtain more of such employment. If you want to be a nursing mercenary, that's certainly your choice and right; but I for one would never assist you (or those of your ilk) in such efforts. You're not the only nurse who needs to eat; IMHO, your employment strategy of stabbing your colleagues in the back is akin to cannibalism.

  • Oct 18 '16

    I find it stunningly ironic, that a nurse who makes a living undermining the livelihood efforts of other nurses, is here asking for advice in how to obtain more of such employment. If you want to be a nursing mercenary, that's certainly your choice and right; but I for one would never assist you (or those of your ilk) in such efforts. You're not the only nurse who needs to eat; IMHO, your employment strategy of stabbing your colleagues in the back is akin to cannibalism.

  • Oct 3 '16

    I find it stunningly ironic, that a nurse who makes a living undermining the livelihood efforts of other nurses, is here asking for advice in how to obtain more of such employment. If you want to be a nursing mercenary, that's certainly your choice and right; but I for one would never assist you (or those of your ilk) in such efforts. You're not the only nurse who needs to eat; IMHO, your employment strategy of stabbing your colleagues in the back is akin to cannibalism.

  • Sep 10 '16

    My question is, can a PICC line catheter tip being in the right atrium cause ECG changes?

    Maybe, but generally, it would be limited to rhythm abnormalities secondary to tissue irritation rather than ischemia (ST segment) infarction (troponin) events. If having a line in the RA or RV were that clinically dangerous, then it would negate the use of Pulmonary Artery (Swan-Ganz) catheters. PICC lines can also be used as a poor man's CVP line. That said, there is nominally a danger of perforation (tamponade) events but those are generally historically statistically small in view of the numerous central venous lines that have been inserted. Further, pacing wire tips routinely are placed directly into either the RA or RV, and if untoward events related to line presence were a big risk, that process would not be even possible.

    My two cents? It was good that the nurses were astute enough to have caught the missed pull back, but in the final analysis, it was probably clinically insignificant.



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