Latest Comments by Psychcns

Latest Comments by Psychcns

Psychcns 10,531 Views

Joined Feb 10, '06. Psychcns is a Psych APRN. She has '30' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Psychiatric Nursing'. Posts: 811 (41% Liked) Likes: 715

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  • 0

    This is an awful experience. It does sound like PTSD and there are some effective therapies, i.e. EMDR. Continue talking about it with your EAP/ private counselor and friends. Processing an event like this sounds very difficult. Give yourself all the time and support you need. Best wishes.

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    Good for you looking into this! You could call insurance companies and ask about quotes. How about talking to malpractice attorneys for how you could protect your license and assets if sued? Have you tried calling the place that offers training to only MD's to seen what it would take to let you in. Maybe a letter of reference for example. Also
    Ask Your BON. You might also check if OK with your state board of medicine and what kind of extra training is recommended. Or other professional organizations. Best wishes.

  • 1
    ICUman likes this.

    Boston is nice but likely an over saturated market. Cape Cod probably uses travelers in summer since it is a vacation area. New England has beautiful areas and depressed areas. Ask your recruiter who is hiring. Northampton, Amherst and the Berkshires are nice. Fall is beautiful I in New England.

  • 1
    JustKeepDriving likes this.

    My understanding is that residents are paid- though not as much as they will make later on. One of the missions ( maybe the primary mission) of the teaching hospitals is to train residents. I also think hospitals get a lot of money from Medicare to do this. I would think attendings in teaching hospitals Are well compensated. How does a hospital become a "teaching hospital". The ones I am familiar with served "the underserved" which automatically gave the med students and residents a lot of patients to learn from. I never quite understood how nursing programs and clinicals were formulated and why. The old diploma schools were richer, I am told.

  • 0

    The nursing "fluff" courses could probably be condensed to one course and meet accreditation requirements. The big take away from research and evidence based practice is how to evaluate research and how to apply to individual situations. More science is always good. Genetics is huge and likely will have big impact on patient care.

  • 0

    Psych guy says it well. Physicians have statuary authority to do everything medically and NP's are relegated to what our NP leaders and lobbyists have been able to get as our scope of practice and this varies state by state. My practice looks a lot like a psychiatrist and my outcomes are good. I have had very good experiences consulting with psychiatrists on difficult patients. I think this is where they are most valuable. I have worked some places where psychiatrist had responsibilities appropriate for the depth and intensity of their superior education. Other places they are doing the same job as me since patient contact is what is reimburse able. I think either our salaries will go up or theirs will come down. Also interesting to consider the future effect of the global economy. No one makes close to US physician salary.

  • 0

    Each state will tell you what you need to write after your name.

  • 1
    LadyFree28 likes this.

    Go for it! There are a lot of roles in nursing. A lot of information on all nurses. There are ways to not become physically and mentally exhausted. I still think it is a great profession after 30 years experience.

  • 0

    Could you transfer the patient to a methadone maintenance program. It sounds like she is a drug abuser and needs more monitoring.

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    I went to a clinically focused program. I was immersed in clinical work before and after I got my degree. When I got my degree my state had just started prescriptive
    Authority. For my first prescribing jobs I found places that gave a lot of support and supervision.
    At my program I think everyone, faculty and students,saw the fluff courses as things to get through.
    I never felt unprepared as a practitioner. Early on I needed more support.
    I think as others have said that more could be done with undergrad and grad education. Lots of ways the knowledge can be divided. Lots of ways education will improve.

  • 0

    OP
    she asked for instances where you were not trained properly! Just give her that. She didn't ask for all the things wrong with the unit. For now focus on learning and doing correct procedures. It is more important now that attend to all detail. You may be stirring up people against you. I think you should still look around for another job.

  • 1
    ICUman likes this.

    5 miles from my house in major teaching hospital area. Psych specialty. Good reputation. Affordable.

  • 2
    ShortShell and LadyFree28 like this.

    The director will listen to the preceptor and her supervisor. They are the ones you have to please. This is politics.
    When you look for a new job do not say anything bad about this facility. If you can leave it off your resume do. If you have to put it on, it is better to have resigned than be fired and "it was not a good fit for me " is the usual neutral reason to give for leaving.
    And that you love the work job is huge. Just be prepared for interviews. Best wishes.

  • 0

    I think they meant any pain meds stronger than Tylenol which was part of the standing orders. I always referred for eval to the medical docs covering. Or ER if indicated.

  • 0

    Maybe ask your supervisor/preceptor to speak up on your behalf. Otherwise you now know a little more than you did before and there are other jobs..


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