Content That GooeyRN Likes

Content That GooeyRN Likes

GooeyRN (8,725 Views)

Joined Nov 27, '05. Posts: 1,735 (18% Liked) Likes: 751

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  • May 17 '13

    It's just so employers can boast. I have no interest.Do what works for you.

  • May 17 '13

    Good for you! There is absolutely nothing wrong with that! Believe me, it doesn't matter what kind of nurse you are, there will always be people who think you should go on and further your education. I have a BSN and am always getting informed I should get NP degree. I don't want to be a NP! I'm happy right where I am. I am saddened by what is happening to the LPN's in our hospital and many others lately! I have the greatest respect for all the LPN's, PCT's, etc that I work with and I don't look down on anyone just because their job is different. Everyone helps make the day go smoother if they do their job! Don't ever let anyone make you feel bad for realizing your dream!

  • May 17 '13

    It seems these days that everyone is pushing, if you've got your LPN, get your RN. If you've got your ADN, get your BSN or MSN. What if everyone wants to "move up"? Who would be left doing the work? I always wonder why hard working people can't be valued for what they provide rather than reminded they could become something else (better- in someone's opinion). Good for you for working for what you got, and enjoying what you have.

  • May 17 '13

    I am a happy LPN. I got my LPN late in life, because circumstances were all in place for me to do so. I was interested in increasing my clinical skill set. It was a perfect plan.

    When I was younger, I graduated from High School with a goal in life of popping out babies and baking bread with a husband that would work. (To all you younger readers, this was a viable option in my day). I successfully raised kids, and when school time came, I was interested in something more. I was not an ideal student in high school, and took the local EMT course to perhaps do a little call, raise a few kids......even had the white picket fence. Then, family was ill and my parents sent me to CNA certification, and I spent some time with family taking care of them. Humbling, for sure.

    I wouldn't call myself a "book smart" kind of a person. But show me, and I was right on it. To travel for an RN course of study, after many years out of school, and not the most ideal learner of abstract things read in books that then have to transpose to real life, was not on the table. My kids were reaching college age. It was their time. I took a job as a CNA at the local hospital. Life was good and I liked what I did.

    Times change and so do values. The economy took a nose dive, I live in a geographically remote area, and it became obvious pretty quickly that I needed to go to an alternate level if I was going to be financially responsible in part to keep a roof. What work did for me was to give me a feeling of independence that I never knew. I could take care of things myself. It was liberating and enlightening.

    I took 18 months of my life, made it work, went to a pilot LPN program in our area that seemed to come out of the blue, and continued to work in a different capacity in the same hospital I was employed at as a CNA. It allowed me a bit more pay, to focus on clinical skills that I love so much, and to be a different part of the same team.

    Being an LPN is a good thing. It focuses on parts of nursing that may be most applicable to where you are in life. I have great admiration for RN's of every caliber. It is amazing to be able to increase your education to the highest level possible and I don't for a moment think that continuing one's education is a bad thing.

    But for me, and many others like me, being an LPN is what we want to do. That is the end goal. It is what is comfortable, what the priority is, what the dream was and was realized. And that is ok. So no, not every LPN wants to continue on to become an RN. Some are happy right where they are.

  • Dec 14 '11

    Med/Surg is a fantastic place to start! Dead end?!? ...I'm not sure where you heard that, but it's the exact opposite! In fact, most places require 1-2 years of Med/Surg as a prereq. Good luck in your new job!

  • Dec 14 '11

    A dead end??? It is the opposite completely. Do two solid years in M/S and you can transfer to almost anywhere else with that as a good, solid foundation.

  • Dec 14 '11

    I can just add my two bits from my own experience. I had been away from nusing for six years. Because of my child's health, I began having to school her at home (a full time job). I kept my license up by renewing every two years, did the CEU's etc... After six years, I took the refresher course required in Texas, and then began to apply. I was very nervous; I didn't think I was hirable, but I just kept taking steps in faith. I now have my dream job - hospice! When I look back, I can't believe how fast the 6 years flew by - I don't regret missing one day of nursing over spending time with my kids. I have one graduating this year - the days are long... but the years are short. The prn idea is great - it just didn't work for me. I needed the weekends to rest and enjoy family. I wish you the very best. I just wanted to let you know that it is not the end of the road for your nursing if you choose to stay home with your kids. Best of luck in your decision process. Now.... go give those little ones a hug!

  • Dec 14 '11

    How about a PRN position on the weekends?

  • Dec 13 '11

    I think you did the right thing. Assuming that there was no way that you could have gotten the resident anything
    stronger for pain to get him/her through the night. But, morphine and ativan needed to be ordered, Hospice needed to intervene... those things may not have happened, or happened quick enough, without a hospital visit. I say good job.

  • Dec 13 '11

    Quote from TheCommuter
    I strongly suspect that your DON was upset about the financial aspects surrounding the transport to the hospital.
    I would like to add to this. . .

    Midnight census is important in LTC facilities due to the monetary aspects. If the resident is not physically present in the LTC facility at midnight due to taking up a bed at a local ER, the LTC facility cannot charge the resident for that day even though their nursing home bed is being held in anticipation of a return (a.k.a. bed hold).

    Your DON possibly has money on her mind, which is probably why she is upset over the transport to the hospital. However, I'll reiterate that you did the right thing for your resident.

  • Dec 13 '11

    You did the right thing...Even if this patient had an order not to send to hospital, the patient has the right to participate in his care and make health care decisions, including the decision to seek attention for pain management...It sounds like he wanted to go and you were absolutely right in helping him make this happen...DNRCC means "no code" not "no care"...Your DON either does not have the medical knowledge to realize what is best for the patient or she just doesn't care...You did a great job

  • Dec 13 '11

    Let me understand: the DON is questioning a physician's order?

  • Dec 12 '11

    Quote from PMFB-RN
    I just opened this discussion to see what was so important about the subject line to merit three exlamations points. As I suspect nothing at all.
    Yeah what was the point of this reply? Just to prove you're nasty? Would you treat people in person like this? I find it funny how people on message boards think they can say whatever they want because they are essentially anonymous.. Also, really, if you had nothing to contribute the post was only a few sentences. I'm sure it did not waste more than 15 seconds of your day..

    As for OP I have no suggestions other than those caps stink at really cleaning the hair, so I'd think actually washing with real shampoo would feel better for the pt.

  • Dec 12 '11

    I am a nurse, and now a patient this week. Trust me - the difference a shower/bath/hair washing makes in how you feel DOES merit three exclamation points. KUDOS to the OP for bringing this up!

  • Dec 12 '11

    Same reason you use "consistent with" instead of "looked like". This rn does laugh sometimes when reviewing this rn's charting.


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