Content That LTCangel Likes

Content That LTCangel Likes

LTCangel 4,404 Views

Joined Nov 8, '05. Posts: 85 (49% Liked) Likes: 137

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  • Sep 18 '15

    Although yelling at a patient is unprofessional, I can sympathize that LTC is tough, especially when you're a brand new nurse being thrown into it with poor orientation. My first few years I started doing LTC / Sub-acute and I was thrown into it, pretty much sink or swim walking off the plank. Take this as a learning experience and focus on moving forward. Since you are fairly new you may be a candidate for the new grad programs that many hospitals offer. I suggest trying that route to get your foot in the door in a hospital and get to watch a preceptor show you some skills. Good luck! Just remember that time moves on, so try to put one foot in front of the other and don't do it again.
    If you feel that way, just take a 2 min break (hide in bathroom) to emotionally recover then start over.

  • Aug 5 '15

    But full moons honestly make the freaks come out at night. They don't call em lunatics for nothing!

  • Aug 5 '15

    Anyone who has ever worked psych or geriatrics during a full moon just knows....

  • Aug 5 '15

    Here's a sentence that I personally would like to become taboo..."It's so much easier on night shift because all the patients really do, is sleep". Seriously day shift! Seriously?

  • Aug 5 '15

    Quote from SubSippi
    I was never superstitious before I became a nurse. Now I keep a lucky rock in my pocket at work, and will jump down someone's throat if they use the "q" word. I also don't schedule myself during a full moon, if I can avoid it.

    Confirmation bias is a hard thing to overcome!!

    Outside the hospital, I'll step on cracks and walk under ladders all day long.
    Full moons are the worst. The. Worst.

  • Aug 5 '15

    We laugh about these at work often..
    Never say the name of a problematic or demanding patient - You are sure to be their nurse during your shift and they are ready to be difficult

    Never say how well behaved or "easy going" someone is.. They will become possessed by some unseen demon and will be projectile vomitting pea soup before you take the next breath.

    If someone said they had an easy day or complain that it's too quiet - they should be beaten with sticks and stones - after the back to back admissions, codes, and natural disasters have occurred of course.

  • Aug 5 '15

    I hate when my coworkers say "Wow, we don't have many cases on our board today". Because you KNOW that each patient after that is going to be a total handful both medically and emotionally. Thank the good Lord for lots of lots of drugs!

  • Aug 5 '15

    I was never superstitious before I became a nurse. Now I keep a lucky rock in my pocket at work, and will jump down someone's throat if they use the "q" word. I also don't schedule myself during a full moon, if I can avoid it.

    Confirmation bias is a hard thing to overcome!!

    Outside the hospital, I'll step on cracks and walk under ladders all day long.

  • Aug 5 '15

    Keep it to yourself, don't let it happen again, and in the future, if a patient tells you they can not afford their medication, then you need to have conversation with social work to go and see this patient so that arrangements can be made.

    There are any number of patients who know that "I can't afford my medication" means that the nurse has to do something about that. Which means they stay longer until social work can get to them. Which means that they can get their medications for free. Which is low on their priority list.

    I would be more concerned that this patient could come back with an exacerbation, and say "welllll I TOLD the nurse I couldn't afford my medication!!"

    It is a duty to act statement. Otherwise, I wouldn't open a can of worms with your manager. Learn and move on.

  • Aug 5 '15

    I've been known to voice my displeasure when posters claim that their belief in God makes them a superior nurse, compared to us "heathens" or think it's acceptable to proselytize at work. I didn't see any of that in your post, OP.


    Quote from nursebri15
    In nursing, I find love, I find meaning, I find old souls to touch my life everyday,
    If only for a short while...
    You are the reason I work, the reason I smile...
    I was actually touched by what you wrote. You sound like a dedicated nurse who finds joy in her work and life. I'm sure that your attitude and caring is appreciated by the geriatric patients under your care.

  • Jul 14 '15

    I eat bad and non-compliant when it comes to my health. I.E. I'm anemic , doc ordered more labs and vitamin D
    I have not taken the vit d or had my labs drawn.

  • Jul 13 '15

    Quote from DawnJ
    I recently spent some time in LTC and was sad to see an attitude of "I'll do this (bedchange, bath, etc) because if I don't someone will complain" rather than "I'll do this XXXX because it is best for the person and will make them more comfortable." I get that CNA type actitivies are hard, heavy, messy, repetitive....but many seem to have lost the concept of the resident as a person and seem to see them as an object and/or annoyance.
    I get where you're coming from, but I think the system of most LTC facilities forces the CNAs to act this way. Management doesn't rewardthem for being caring and compassionate. They reward them for performing tasks and making sure arbitrary regulations are met. And in this economy the aides work under the constant threat of dismissal. I'd be more worried about pleasing management and covering my butt, too.

  • Feb 3 '15

    Your resident is perfectly right to be upset. Frankly I think your facility treated her terribly. Maybe since I'm not a nurse yet I'm naive or something, but it seems to me to be plain stupid to put someone on contact precautions in a room with someone who is not.

  • Feb 3 '15

    Nope wouldn't happen in my facility. If a patient has VRE the only roommate they can be paired with is another patient that has VRE.

  • Feb 3 '15

    In my opinion.... as an MDS/staffing coordinator, I would NEVER put the resident with VRE in a room with another resident. Your infection control nurse should be consulted prior to admitting anyone neediing precautions BEFORE they are admitted. If you do not have an Infection control nurse, then check with your DON before as well. the CDCis a good resource on this issue as well.


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