Interesting facts and observations. - page 4

I am a nursing student and have been working as a Nurse's Aide for just over one year. To date I have helped care for just over 500 patients. A grand total of three (3) have specifically asked... Read More

  1. by   leemacaz
    If I am unconcious, I won't know it anyway...
    I hope that I have not left the impression that I think female caregivers are not competent at their job...I just would prefer a male if I could not take care of myself... less embarrasing to me.. thats all I mean.
  2. by   TraumaNurseRN
    [quote=58flyer;3124661]i guess it would be decision time. it would depend on how bad i needed the treatment,(er=emergency) how long could it wait, is there a follow on shift with males available, and so on. (omg....this is funny....)the only times i have needed emergency care were when i was at a level 1 center anyway, there were always male personnel working at the time. so, it's never presented a problem, except for attitudes of course. heck, if i'm hurt bad enough i won't be in a position to request anything anyway, so i'll just deal with it when i can. i try not to worry myself over what i cannot control.[/quote]

    exactly my point!!! (which is what er should be used for) one thing though....you would not be allowed to wait till the next shift in the ed suite for your preference. you would be discharged and told to follow up with your primary in the next day or so.
  3. by   TraumaNurseRN
    Quote from wymnwise
    Well, that is obvious as women have been forced for generations to suffer nothing but male care.

    I just want to be told the truth, respectfully asked about training, and given some control and choices over providers and situations. When women are available for intimate procedures I prefer them and do not mind the wait in a non-emergency context. I want to be informed of any training and asked specific consent. I may if introduced and properly asked be willing to help train a small group (2 or 3), but not while I am sedated. I do not ever want to be left alone with a male or males while under anesthesia, or at least that was the rule, now I am not willing to be sedated without a family member present. Why? Well, practice exams, bait and switch operations, and repeatedly being left alone with men under anesthesia over objections. My postion is not unreasonable nor irrational. Charges of such is simply abusive.
  4. by   TraumaNurseRN
    Quote from jthewood
    +1....good point.

    That why we feel so unappreciated at times, because without us....who would care for you. So without patients we wouldn't have a job....without us patients would not be cared for.....Cause the DOCS aren't gonna do our work....and doubt if most patients would ever consider doing our job....Let's make it a win win situation here. When a request is made for a same sex caregiver and IT IS OKAY WITH THE STAFFING NEEDS OF THE FACILITY...SURE.....otherwise, patients have to understand that you cannot "demand" certain care and expect it like you are on the lounge floor of the Ritz Carlton....it does not work that way.
  5. by   sharkdiver
    Trauma,

    Not that I disagree with you, but the bottom line is that the patient has the right to refuse care by any caregiver for any reason. If a patient requests a same sex caregiver and the facility can't accommodate for staffing reasons, then they need to explain that to the patient and try to come up with a compromise. If the patient still refuses and the care involved is not essential to the patient's treatment, then simply document and move on. Beyond that, the facility's options are to either discharge them if their condition permits, or transfer them to another facility.
  6. by   58flyer
    Quote from TraumaNurseRN
    That why we feel so unappreciated at times, because without us....who would care for you. So without patients we wouldn't have a job....without us patients would not be cared for.....Cause the DOCS aren't gonna do our work....and doubt if most patients would ever consider doing our job....Let's make it a win win situation here. When a request is made for a same sex caregiver and IT IS OKAY WITH THE STAFFING NEEDS OF THE FACILITY...SURE.....otherwise, patients have to understand that you cannot "demand" certain care and expect it like you are on the lounge floor of the Ritz Carlton....it does not work that way.
    I see you have been busy this AM with the posting :typing. Good morning to you sunshine .

    I know the difference between a hospital and a 5 star motel. But since you brought it up, I bet that hospital stay is a heck of a lot more expensive than a night at the Ritz Carlton. I don't expect to be treated like royalty, but some respect would be nice. In my experience in requesting same sex care it seemed that people would get an attitude about it. I was just asking, I understand if the requested caregiver wasn't available. I would be more inclined to accept care from whoever was available if they were professional about it. But it is hard to trust someone once they display an unprofessional attitude.

    More than once I have accepted the invitation to go elsewhere.

    Peace, my friend:flowersfo.
  7. by   SuesquatchRN
    A male wouldn't get same sex care here. We have one male nurse who works the ED and supervises on nights. You also are not likely to get an RN nights or evenings or a physician unless you're admitted.
  8. by   TraumaNurseRN
    Quote from sharkdiver
    Trauma,

    Not that I disagree with you, but the bottom line is that the patient has the right to refuse care by any caregiver for any reason. If a patient requests a same sex caregiver and the facility can't accommodate for staffing reasons, then they need to explain that to the patient and try to come up with a compromise. If the patient still refuses and the care involved is not essential to the patient's treatment, then simply document and move on. Beyond that, the facility's options are to either discharge them if their condition permits, or transfer them to another facility.
    Exactly my point!
  9. by   TraumaNurseRN
    Quote from 58flyer
    I see you have been busy this AM with the posting :typing. Good morning to you sunshine .

    I know the difference between a hospital and a 5 star motel. But since you brought it up, I bet that hospital stay is a heck of a lot more expensive than a night at the Ritz Carlton. I don't expect to be treated like royalty, but some respect would be nice. In my experience in requesting same sex care it seemed that people would get an attitude about it. I was just asking, I understand if the requested caregiver wasn't available. I would be more inclined to accept care from whoever was available if they were professional about it. But it is hard to trust someone once they display an unprofessional attitude.

    More than once I have accepted the invitation to go elsewhere.

    Peace, my friend:flowersfo.
    I agree.....
  10. by   WithoutTheH
    Quote from Draken
    I am curious how it will affect me in my career, I am good looking and muscular not something you see in straight male nurses. every other male nurse i have met not in the army seemed a little fem but this cannot be the rule can it be?
    Wow. you really just said that eh? I'm 6'0 and a fit guy, and not feminine at all, and neither is any of the other 7 guys in my class (expect the ONE gay guy). But seriously all long as you put on a professional look, it shouldn't affect your working situation at all.

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