From Cop to Nurse - page 4

I am currently a cop in my hometown and have been in this career for going on seven years. I was never afforded the opportunity to go to college and until recently never saw the need for me to go. ... Read More

  1. by   Cdhall72
    So, maybe someone can give me some advice. I have been centered around law enforcement my whole life. I have 2 degrees different degrees relating to law enforcement, and I have already been to the police academy (I sent my self through). But while I was looking applying for jobs I figured why not just go back to nursing school so I can use my time wisely. So I did and now I'm finishing up my first semester next week. I'm in a accelerated BS program and I graduate August 2019. Recently I have had a opportunity to work for a agency that I have always to work for. I guess the big difference between me and most of you is that you all worked in law enforcement and I haven't, so I still have this "bug" that wants me a police officer. So my question to you all is should I take the job with the department? Or just stay in school full time? And part time school would not be a option. It's all or nothing either way. Also, would you recommend if I stay in school maybe become part cop after and just be a PRN nurse? Or just give up being a cop all together? I'm looking forward to these responses!
  2. by   Medic_Murse
    Oh my friend, as a former cop (yes, I've had a lot of careers, shut up people!), I'll skip some steps here (program manager, EMT, Paramedic,) now a nurse, there is always room for a cop at the nurses station. Co-workers love me because I don't put up with peoples crap, I'll call people out on their BS (slack ass co-workers), and for those unruly patients? If they want to swing, fine...they are getting subdued and restrained. There is no shock and awe at the fact I got punched, kicked, slapped, etc. Just immediate action, which really takes them by surprise.

    Now before all the rainbow, unicorn, and sunshine warrior nurses come roaring in waving the shame finger, this isn't a daily occurrence, only when the circumstance calls for it. I have more than enough performance evals and commendations to support the fact, I'm not RAMBO every shift.

    So, hell yeah! Come on in, you'll get abused and treated like crap as if you were a cop, but unlike going to court, wasting your entire day, and watching some jackass walk out on a technicality, you'll actually be making a difference and with a constant team that will support you 100% for 12 hours.
  3. by   Cdhall72
    I see how both of these careers can benefit each other in many ways. But my main question is should I just give up on law enforcement entirely? Or should I finish my nursing degree and then possibly go back into law enforcement and be a part time nurse? Im actually thinking about applying for the Tennessee Highway Patrol once I finish nursing school. I guess I just need some motivation to show me that their is light at the end of the tunnel for me. Im just trying to figure out which career I would be better suited for in the end. I kinda of want to know what peoples personal Pro's and Con's are of each career.
  4. by   Medic_Murse
    Quote from Cdhall72
    I see how both of these careers can benefit each other in many ways. But my main question is should I just give up on law enforcement entirely? Or should I finish my nursing degree and then possibly go back into law enforcement and be a part time nurse? Im actually thinking about applying for the Tennessee Highway Patrol once I finish nursing school. I guess I just need some motivation to show me that their is light at the end of the tunnel for me. Im just trying to figure out which career I would be better suited for in the end. I kinda of want to know what peoples personal Pro's and Con's are of each career.
    That depends on if you can make that work. Part time, at least where I have worked, you're required to work two 12 hour shifts a week. So, depending on the police schedule, it might work. The other option is PRN where you're required to work 24 hours a month (again, depending on hospital policy). The hard part with that is, it's difficult to train a new nurse that is PRN and in some circumstances Part time.
  5. by   Cdhall72
    Yes, every department where I live works 12 hour shifts. But it doesn't mean that I will be able to get a job with a department as soon as I graduate. Some departments test 2 times a year, sometimes only once a year. So in theory, I could graduate nursing school and work full time as a nurse for a year or longer before I would have a opportunity to join a department. I guess my major question to you is would it be worth it to go through nursing school just to work as a part time or PRN nurse? The way the world has gotten toward law enforcement its a very dangerous profession. Everyone tells me they wish I wouldn't do it, but I still have this itch that I can't seem to scratch.... Im just torn between two very amazing careers
  6. by   SurfCA40
    Quote from Cdhall72
    Yes, every department where I live works 12 hour shifts. But it doesn't mean that I will be able to get a job with a department as soon as I graduate. Some departments test 2 times a year, sometimes only once a year. So in theory, I could graduate nursing school and work full time as a nurse for a year or longer before I would have a opportunity to join a department. I guess my major question to you is would it be worth it to go through nursing school just to work as a part time or PRN nurse? The way the world has gotten toward law enforcement its a very dangerous profession. Everyone tells me they wish I wouldn't do it, but I still have this itch that I can't seem to scratch.... Im just torn between two very amazing careers
    Whether you're entering law enforcement or nursing, you're going to need thick skin. That being said, I think you need to have a long hard look at your life right now. You wanted to be a cop, but wanted to kill time so you went to nursing school, now you're thinking about being a cop after you finish nursing school, maybe doing both, but not really sure what you want to do. You're all over the place. That's a red flag for a police background check to me. I've been in law enforcement for 8 years and I'm just starting my ABSN program as I transition out of law enforcement. You need to figure out one thing that you want to do, put your effort into that, and do it well. That being said, both law enforcement and nursing are career fields where you really need to have a want to be in that profession and not just do it for the glory, title, or paycheck. Going back and forth and just trying one of these two career fields to see if one sticks or not is a terrible idea. Figure out which one (if either) you want to do and focus on that. Just my two cents.
  7. by   PMFB-RN
    Quote from Medic_Murse
    Oh my friend, as a former cop (yes, I've had a lot of careers, shut up people!), I'll skip some steps here (program manager, EMT, Paramedic,) now a nurse, there is always room for a cop at the nurses station. Co-workers love me because I don't put up with peoples crap, I'll call people out on their BS (slack ass co-workers), and for those unruly patients? If they want to swing, fine...they are getting subdued and restrained. There is no shock and awe at the fact I got punched, kicked, slapped, etc. Just immediate action, which really takes them by surprise.

    Now before all the rainbow, unicorn, and sunshine warrior nurses come roaring in waving the shame finger, this isn't a daily occurrence, only when the circumstance calls for it. I have more than enough performance evals and commendations to support the fact, I'm not RAMBO every shift.

    So, hell yeah! Come on in, you'll get abused and treated like crap as if you were a cop, but unlike going to court, wasting your entire day, and watching some jackass walk out on a technicality, you'll actually be making a difference and with a constant team that will support you 100% for 12 hours.

    Your abilities and skills in dealing with those situations with patients would be even more valuable dealing with unruly physicians.
    In my current unit about half of our RN's are male and nearly all of us are veterans, many with significant deployment experience. This is largely due to the fact that, in this state, veterans (medics & corpsmen) are given advanced standing in nursing programs, and that in this hospital system military time is counted as seniority for retirement purposes. So we attract a LOT of veterans.
    It's always a shock for interns in July when they hit the wards. After dealing with more "normal" nurses on other units they arrive to ours and some of them experience a bit of a culture shock in the physician / nurse dynamics. They quickly learn to speak more professionally and respectfully to nursing staff.
  8. by   Cdhall72
    Quote from SurfCA40
    Whether you're entering law enforcement or nursing, you're going to need thick skin. That being said, I think you need to have a long hard look at your life right now. You wanted to be a cop, but wanted to kill time so you went to nursing school, now you're thinking about being a cop after you finish nursing school, maybe doing both, but not really sure what you want to do. You're all over the place. That's a red flag for a police background check to me. I've been in law enforcement for 8 years and I'm just starting my ABSN program as I transition out of law enforcement. You need to figure out one thing that you want to do, put your effort into that, and do it well. That being said, both law enforcement and nursing are career fields where you really need to have a want to be in that profession and not just do it for the glory, title, or paycheck. Going back and forth and just trying one of these two career fields to see if one sticks or not is a terrible idea. Figure out which one (if either) you want to do and focus on that. Just my two cents.

    I appreciate your feed back and I agree I'm all over the place and wanna have the best of both worlds. The beauty of nursing is once I get my license is pretty easy to keep. You just have to work at least one can a month. But let me ask you this... why do you want to leave law enforcement and start a career in nursing? No hidden agenda behind that question. I just wanted know your reasoning for the switch. Thanks!
  9. by   PMFB-RN
    Quote from Cdhall72
    I appreciate your feed back and I agree I'm all over the place and wanna have the best of both worlds. The beauty of nursing is once I get my license is pretty easy to keep. You just have to work at least one can a month. But let me ask you this... why do you want to leave law enforcement and start a career in nursing? No hidden agenda behind that question. I just wanted know your reasoning for the switch. Thanks!

    That only true once you have a solid knowledge and skill base. New grads are basically helpless and useless. To just maintain by working once a month or so, you'll first need a solid experience base.

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