When is it ok to ask for a raise?

  1. 0
    Hey all, new to the boards and wanted to know if there are any specific details about nursing when it comes to getting raises.

    Some background info:

    I started my first LVN job in 08/2012 working for a/n pediatric agency. I worked there for 6 months. Due to the low starting pay ($15/hr), no benefits, difficult patient, terrible boss, established co-worker who hogged EVERY weekend for those 6 months and an annoying mother (the patient's, not mine) I decided to switch agencies. I began with a new agency in 02/2013 and everything is much better; 1.50/hr increase, dominion over my schedule, and much friendlier patient family. I've been here only 2 months and realize its too early to ask for a raise, but I would like to know so that I can start planning ahead. -I'm a planner/worrier-

    I live and work in the LA county area, in the gateway cities between east LA and OC. I'm not sure how my current wage stacks up against the LVN average for people in my area with similar work experience.

    I apologize for typos, but Im on my phone and at work . Any input would be greatly appreciated, I apologize for the length but brevity is not really my thing
  2. 5 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    It's OK for you to ask for a raise as soon as you are prepared to be unemployed. There are maybe 200 nurses, countrywide, in every educational realm, that cannot find any job. Hence, the downward presssure on wages. I'm thinking that once Obamacare kicks in, the hiring will escalate. For now, sadly...
  4. 1
    The wages for this type of job having been heading downward in LA County as tough economic times have hit us and the new reality that there is no nursing shortage (in fact it is just the opposite). Some agencies are better than others in that respect.

    Many of these agencies are subject to the ups and downs of the state budget process, so they really tighten their belts in anticipation of cuts and delays in reimbursement for patients on Medi-Cal or Medi-Care.

    Your starting wage of $15/hr as a new grad is low compared to past years, but to me it is significant that your new agency gave you a $1.50 raise after 6 months of experience. That is a good raise percentage-wise so if it were me, I wouldn't think about asking for more for at least 6 months. Your seniority with that agency starts over again, but that is a small price to pay for the improved work conditions.

    How you proceed will be influenced by a couple of things. First would be the acuity level. A client with a trach and vent will usually pay more than one who just has a G-tube, without significant respiratory issues, for example.

    The other factor would be how they perceive your value to their company in all areas that would be covered on a standard evaluation . . .work habits, reliability, professionalism, clinical excellence, attitude, etc. I was actually offered a raise by an agency because I had a really challenging family/patient environment - I was shocked! (pleasantly). This was after a little over a year of employment.

    All of this is so individualized to the employee, employer, budget considerations, etc that it is impossible to give a specific number. Those are just some of the things to think about - good luck, it sounds like you've got a good fit this time with your new agency and client! :-)
    TheCommuter likes this.
  5. 0
    Quote from nursel56
    The wages for this type of job having been heading downward in LA County as tough economic times have hit us and the new reality that there is no nursing shortage (in fact it is just the opposite). Some agencies are better than others in that respect.

    Many of these agencies are subject to the ups and downs of the state budget process, so they really tighten their belts in anticipation of cuts and delays in reimbursement for patients on Medi-Cal or Medi-Care.

    Your starting wage of $15/hr as a new grad is low compared to past years, but to me it is significant that your new agency gave you a $1.50 raise after 6 months of experience. That is a good raise percentage-wise so if it were me, I wouldn't think about asking for more for at least 6 months. Your seniority with that agency starts over again, but that is a small price to pay for the improved work conditions.

    How you proceed will be influenced by a couple of things. First would be the acuity level. A client with a trach and vent will usually pay more than one who just has a G-tube, without significant respiratory issues, for example.

    The other factor would be how they perceive your value to their company in all areas that would be covered on a standard evaluation . . .work habits, reliability, professionalism, clinical excellence, attitude, etc. I was actually offered a raise by an agency because I had a really challenging family/patient environment - I was shocked! (pleasantly). This was after a little over a year of employment.

    All of this is so individualized to the employee, employer, budget considerations, etc that it is impossible to give a specific number. Those are just some of the things to think about - good luck, it sounds like you've got a good fit this time with your new agency and client! :-)

    Eloguently, and well said.
  6. 0
    Quote from SuzieVN
    Eloguently, and well said.
    Thank you!
  7. 0
    In my experience, wage increases are usually granted annually (once a year) by nonunion employers. I personally would wait until you've been with this workplace for one solid year before broaching the topic of a pay raise.

    In addition, the previous posters have mentioned that there's a total glut of LVNs searching for employment in the various counties in southern California, which is doing nothing but pushing the wages downward. If 200+ people are applying for each job opening, employers can basically offer low pay rates because they know there's a line of unemployed nurses who will accept the position with no questions asked.


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