Question on Nursing Education

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    I was wondering if anyone knew of an LPN program in NJ that would take credits from an RN program. After completing medical assisting the next logical step seemed to be an RN program. After finishing about 75% of a RN/Associates program I realized I really didn't enjoy the hospital experience. I've since gotten my associates in science and become a certified coder. Now, working as a worker's compensation coordinator for a medical group, I think I might enjoy becoming a nurse case manager for an insurance company. Does anyone have any suggestions for someone who wants as little hospital experience as possible, but loves learning theory and has 8 yrs experience in medical field? Maybe an LPN program that will take my credits. Also, if anyone knows if you can become a CCM as an LPN?
    Joe V likes this.
  2. 6 Comments so far...

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    Check your BON. You might be able to take the NCLEX-PN now. But LPN's are nurses. I'm not sure what you think LPN's do. I was always under the impression that Case Managers were experienced RNs.
    loriangel14 likes this.
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    Thanks for the info, I didn't think to check if I could take the NCLEX-PN now. I know LPNs are nurses, but not all nurses work in hospitals. I was looking to finish a nursing degree quickly, hence the LPN as opposed to RN, In order to work in an office environment or insurance environment. From what I've heard, I think you are right about case management. Hopefully there might be another opportunity in insurance as an LPN, maybe denials.
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    What exactly did you dislike about the hospital experience? Maybe you would enjoy being a school nurse or working in a nursing home. I am a CNA in a nursing home while I am in nursing school and there is a good mix of RNs and LVNs who work there. Most of the supervisors are RNs (unless they have lots, like 40 years, of experience as an LVN). However, most of the nurses that handle MDS (medicare billing and case management) are LVNs. Your experience might fit well in that role, but I would think that you might still need hands on nursing experience. But I could be wrong.
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    I am wondering why you're so set on a LPN program. You have much better chance of working outside the hospital environment as a RN. I have never heard of a case manager having less than a BSN.
    Quote from Jess122686
    I was wondering if anyone knew of an LPN program in NJ that would take credits from an RN program. After completing medical assisting the next logical step seemed to be an RN program. After finishing about 75% of a RN/Associates program I realized I really didn't enjoy the hospital experience. I've since gotten my associates in science and become a certified coder. Now, working as a worker's compensation coordinator for a medical group, I think I might enjoy becoming a nurse case manager for an insurance company. Does anyone have any suggestions for someone who wants as little hospital experience as possible, but loves learning theory and has 8 yrs experience in medical field? Maybe an LPN program that will take my credits. Also, if anyone knows if you can become a CCM as an LPN?
    loriangel14 likes this.
  7. 0
    It seems that an BSN program might be faster if you've already completed most of your courses. You could have your credits transferred to a University. Not all RNs work in the hospital that is just where you do most of your clinicals
    Quote from Jess122686
    Thanks for the info, I didn't think to check if I could take the NCLEX-PN now. I know LPNs are nurses, but not all nurses work in hospitals. I was looking to finish a nursing degree quickly, hence the LPN as opposed to RN, In order to work in an office environment or insurance environment. From what I've heard, I think you are right about case management. Hopefully there might be another opportunity in insurance as an LPN, maybe denials.
  8. 0
    In NJ you CANNOT take the LPN exam unless you graduate from a practical nursing program.

    In additon as nearly all LPN programs are vocational in nature college credits are not used. Generaly you would be 'exempted' from the LPN level A&P and nutrition if you successfully completed those courses at the collegiate level. Otherwise there is no direct correlation between associates level nursing courses and practical nursing courses and clinicals. Scope of practice and depth of information (for example PN students are taught basic ECG's but RN students are generally given more instruction on interpretation and recognition of various rhythms and arrhythmia)

    Practical nursing students are required to do clinicals in the hospital setting in addition to rehabilitation units, long term care, pediatric facilities, OB/maternity units, and psychiatric hospitals/units. (LPN's must complete clinical rotation in general med-surg, pediatrics, geriatrics, maternity/women's health, and psychiatric/mental health nursing plus theory coursework in order to be eligible for the NCLEX-PN exam).

    In addition, as most nursing programs are set up differently with the same end goal it is rare that you can transfer nursing courses from one program to the next (with the exception of an RN who completed an associates or diploma program who is accepted to a RN->BSN completion program). I don't think that I've heard of anyone completing only 75% of a ASN program and successfully transferring into a BSN program, but that's not to say it is impossible. I looked at four BSN programs in NJ, aside from those that offer RN to BSN options, only two programs stated that they would consider accepting a transfer student into the nursing program if they partially completed another nursing program on a case by case basis.

    As others have said, nurse case managers are generally RN's. Nurse case managers generally are required to have several years of clinical experience before being hired as a case manager in an insurance company or elsewhere. In order to become a CCM, a nurse MUST be a registered nurse with a specific amount of documented, paid work experience. A few other professionals are eligible to become case managers such as certified social workers, licensed social workers, etc.

    Most non clinical nursing positions whether administrative or otherwise are relegated to registered nurses who have several years of bedside or other clinical experience. Nursing positions in an office setting, such as a clinic, are available for LPNs or RNs they just don't necessarily pay as well as a hospital position. Not everyone wants to work in a hospital setting, I don't wants to work in a hospital. I'm very happy with my home health nursing position working with medically complex/medically fragile pediatric patients.


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