Medical assistants and LPNs - page 15

HI all, I have just finished a medical assisting program and im now looking for a job. I have noticed alot of job openings for lpn but nothing for medical assistants. I was wondering first of... Read More

  1. by   AngelaLPN08
    WOW, this was quite interesting reading material. I had two MA's in my LPN class, they were working a doctors office and were happy that they knew how to do some of the skills that we were learning. However here in South Dakota I have never seen a MA position open, however I don't look for it either. It seems like a crazy fine line between skills, this that and the other thing. I don't know what South Dakota laws are, but I was allowed to pass oral medication after 20 hours of a class, and this included narcotics too. It is kind of scary now that I reflect because a Nurse was responsible for me as a Medication Aid and I honestly knew nothing about some meds, what needed BP's, Pulses. I was virtually in charge of my wing since there was 1 nurse but she was on the other wing and rarely came to see me.
    I also as an LPN can not do IV push meds in South Dakota. But that's why in nursing school they always stressed to know what the Nurse Practice Act in your state is BEFORE starting in a diffrent state!
    In the end we are all in the medical field and need to do our job to the best of our ability and training. Never step out of your comfort zone regardless of what your title may be. We always need to look at the safety of our patients.
    Best of luck to you all!
    Angela
  2. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from 411
    you might want to check around on that one there are many things a ma can do that an lpn cant do experience is the big key word here i have been through the exact same training that the lpn in my office has been through and even more when my patients call they want to speak to the "nurse" around here this would be me all orders are taken from my dr and documented lpn and ma are interchangeable
    The skills may be interchangable within that particular setting, however, in a hospital, nursing home, skilled facility or wherever else, the roles dramatically differ.
  3. by   kat7ap
    Quote from 411
    you might want to check around on that one there are many things a ma can do that an lpn cant do experience is the big key word here i have been through the exact same training that the lpn in my office has been through and even more when my patients call they want to speak to the "nurse" around here this would be me all orders are taken from my dr and documented lpn and ma are interchangeable
    I'm not going to bother debating between LPN and MA any more, but you need to be very careful about calling yourself a nurse. Unless you went to nursing school and passed the NCLEX for LPN/LVN or RN, you are NOT a nurse. In many states it is a protected title and you can get into big trouble for calling yourself a nurse if you are not.
  4. by   AnnemRN
    Quote from 411
    you might want to check around on that one there are many things a ma can do that an lpn cant do experience is the big key word here i have been through the exact same training that the lpn in my office has been through and even more when my patients call they want to speak to the "nurse" around here this would be me all orders are taken from my dr and documented lpn and ma are interchangeable
    It's been addressed on this site many times in the past, an MA is not interchangeable with an LVN. I don't know where you get your information, but it is illegal for an MA to present themselves as a "nurse" to patients. A nursing license is "the big key", not experience. Please call your state's BON and ask them if representing yourself as a nurse is okay under the law.
  5. by   iwanna
    MAs are taught skills in outpatient setting. They go to school longer than LPNs do.(if for degree program) I have gone through Medical Assistant Program and have ASB degree. The schooling was longer because I was trained in front and back office. However, I was in state of shock at the pay after I graduated. So, I continued on to attempt my RN. Well, I made it quite far in RN program, but transferred into LPN program after failing a med-surg class. But, going through Medical Assistant's Training and Nurses training, there is a huge difference. Yes, MA can do a lot of what LPN can do in office. In fact, up until now, I could not figure out why they would hire LPNs in drs. office. (MOA is much cheaper) But, now in state of PA, LPNs are able to take drs. orders. Only RNs were able to do that before this year.
  6. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from iwanna
    MAs are taught skills in outpatient setting. They go to school longer than LPNs do.(if for degree program)
    This is not necessarily accurate. LPNs have the option of completing their associate of applied science degree in practical nursing at many local community colleges. An associate degree, whether in medical assisting or practical nursing, takes about the same amount of time. Therefore, neither healthcare worker went to school longer if they are both degreed.
  7. by   tothepointeLVN
    At the school I'm at MA goes for 8 months but only come for 4 hours a day versus 12 months for LVN and 7-8 hours a day
  8. by   VM85
    well now, i think ill change the stmosphere and focus on the original posters question.....Angela,i may not be answering this fully but obviously from the last replies, location plays a factor. What I was taught was that an LPN was a nurse and an MA was an assistant...but I have seen ads that do say MA/LPN but i think either that they have positions open for both or they are waiting to see what experience and/or qualifications the applicant has and see if they can hire the MA rather than the LPN if the experience could work, due to lower costs. The erason I chose to go to school for an lpn was one so i could advance to an rn while working and this is current info since I just got accepted.....An MA is trained in a quick oer veiw of all the areas that an LPN concentrates on but they also spend time learning office and filing tasks as well. SOmeone may be able to train you as one of the previous posters also said....i dont think one is better than the other but i do agree that from an outsiders position...anLPN is an actual nurse while a MA is an assistant to the doctor or Rn....just different training in different areas. You could call and ask when an ad is posted for a job and see if thats what they are looking for to clarify andthat would be probably the best thing to do for eacha nd every place because some places may say no others may be open to the idea, provided your experiences and qualifications.....goodluck!!!! I know alot of people feel strongly about these topics so Im sorry if I have stepped on anyones toes....I am not be 100% correct but thats my answer to the best of my knowledge!
  9. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from victoriam85
    well now, i think ill change the stmosphere and focus on the original posters question.....
    The original poster has not visited these forums since 3/5/2007, so she has probably had all of her questions answered many moons ago. It is safe to conjecture she's no longer reading these posts.

    Yes, this is a very old thread. . .

close