LPNs Often Fare Better Than Some Degree Earners - page 3

Some readers might be aware that a college bubble is forming in the United States. Since so many people in this day and age have earned college degrees when compared to previous generations, the value of having one has decreased... Read More

  1. 3
    Quote from sidroc
    If you so wish, I would only agree with the poster because she mentions useless degrees like 4 year psych degrees that lead to no jobs. However, the implications of many of the responses have been directed at the BSN program, which leads to the LPN double standard of talking up the LPN's accomplishments, and talking down the acheivement of the BSN.
    you are priceless....please, the floor is yours....I want to hear what you really think....
    Fiona59, BrandonLPN, and tothepointeLVN like this.

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  2. 5
    Who talked down the BSN? In other posts you certainly DID talk down the value of vocational schools. You said the LPNs who came out of these schools are of lesser quality and that you resented being "under" their direction as a CNA. I was defending the LPN role in general and vocational education in particular.
    AheleneLPN, Fiona59, klace84, and 2 others like this.
  3. 3
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    Who talked down the BSN? In other posts you certainly DID talk down the value of vocational schools. You said the LPNs who came out of these schools are of lesser quality and that you resented being "under" their direction as a CNA. I was defending the LPN role in general and vocational education in particular.
    Just ignore him he's just another typical newish poster that comes on AN and only posts vinegar and never offers anything positive to the site. Having opinions is one thing having ONLY opinions is another.
    apaz123, Fiona59, and klace84 like this.
  4. 5
    Nice article,very well said!! While you won't get rich,I'm futher ahead now and I'm proud to be a LPN and working on my BSN in the process..can't complain bout the skills/knowledge I've learned along the way. I think the money is pretty good in MD for LPNs...($22-30)
  5. 3
    I agree with all the posters above, I am able to afford lots of things that I never had and also pay for my RN education out of pocket. Also I kind of know what to expect during RN school so that's kind of like a weight of anxiety off my shoulders. I also fear that I will have to take a pay cut when I become an RN because I will be considered a new RN. I have been an LPN for 3 years and have made mid twenties hourly for the last 2 years. I surely hope I don't have to bump my wage down to early twenties to gt a job as an RN.
    AheleneLPN, Fiona59, and rayshettabrown like this.
  6. 3
    I don't regret getting my LPN either. I am currently going to school for ADN. I think being an LPN helps with RN school. I also have a degree in medical assisting so needless to say I have quite a bit of medical experience. Hopefully after I become an RN I can get a BSN. It doesnt hurt to have as much education as possible.
    shudva, rayshettabrown, and prettymica like this.
  7. 6
    I graduated in 2010 with my BSN. I do not regret it because I did some serious thinking about it ahead of time when deciding to do an LPN, AN or BSN. The reason I chose BSN was because I knew I would never return to school again (I was 38 when I started back) and if I did not do it then, I never would. I have watched and heard through the grapevine that some of my fellow students who graduated with me....some with straight A's throughout the 4 years had already quit nursing because 1. they thought they would make more money than they actual were or 2. it was a lot more work than they thought. Luckily, for me, both my Mom and Dad were LPN's and I already knew what I was in for. So.....being an LPN may be the way to go at least until you get your feet wet and know what you are in for.....you don't waste years or money that way.
  8. 1
    Quote from kath<3
    I graduated in 2010 with my BSN. I do not regret it because I did some serious thinking about it ahead of time when deciding to do an LPN, AN or BSN. The reason I chose BSN was because I knew I would never return to school again (I was 38 when I started back) and if I did not do it then, I never would. I have watched and heard through the grapevine that some of my fellow students who graduated with me....some with straight A's throughout the 4 years had already quit nursing because 1. they thought they would make more money than they actual were or 2. it was a lot more work than they thought. Luckily, for me, both my Mom and Dad were LPN's and I already knew what I was in for. So.....being an LPN may be the way to go at least until you get your feet wet and know what you are in for.....you don't waste years or money that way.
    Agreed, it can be a good way of deciding if nursing is for you.
    Fiona59 likes this.
  9. 0
    I totally agree!
  10. 5
    Well, don't I feel stupid for spending almost $230K on my Ivy-League undergrad education(about 90% was scholarship, but STILL)! Haha. I wouldn't take it back though, because the connections you make attending those types of institutions are priceless. I could go to almost any city in the world and call up someone to "look out for me" if need be. Every job or internship I've had since entering college has been through an alum or Ivy-League "pocket-piece". I don't say that to brag, I say it simply to justify why people may make certain educational decisions. I majored in Government w/a Public Law Concentration. I didn't do so because I like politics, I did it because I was convinced that I wanted to go to law school and that was the closest thing they had to a Pre-Law program. Welp, guess what? I no longer want to be a lawyer and have effectively wasted about two yrs of my life taking those classes. Had the bright idea to become a nurse dawned on me at that time, I would've already had the Second-Degree ABSN pre-reqs out of the way. Now I have to pay for them out of my OWN pocket and I am NOT happy about it. Thankfully, I was able to find a job rather quickly right out of school last yr, so I work full-time now, at a typical entry-level job (mid-40s range), in of all things, finance (which I absolutely hate by the way). I say all of that to say that I agree with the post. There is a general push to gain 4yr degrees as opposed to learning a trade, and because of this, the corporate job market is cutthroat. I'm a strong advocate for education,so I wouldn't go so far as to encourage people NOT to obtain degrees, but it is true, there are LPNs making exactly what it took me 4yrs of many sleepless nights, boring lectures, and useless papers to make. At the end of the day, degrees don't pay bills, wages do.
    livelikegold, shudva, Fiona59, and 2 others like this.


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