Eliminating LPNs - are hospitals doing this? - page 6

Hello All, My mother is an LPN at a major women's and children's medical center in Honolulu. Recently the hospital announced that it may eliminate the LPN position throughout the hopsital in the... Read More

  1. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    It's frustrating at any level to be looked down upon. There are some people that think part of their 'entitlement' upon licensing is to treat others like their peons.

    Extremely frustrating to know you worked very hard to get where you are and there will always be the one that see you as less than zero because you didn't get a college degree. Luckily the floor i work on, everyone recognizes and respects each other, no matter what level or nursing education they have completed. That's the kind of co-workers i like.
  2. by   BBFRN
    So then in that line of thinking, we should get rid of NPs too, right? Or, we should all have NP degrees, since there should be no variation, right? When you stated previously that LPNs should be considered nurse's aides (thus making a correllation between the 2), it appeared that you thought they held the same disciplines. Maybe the LPN scope of practice in your state is narrower than in KY?
    What if there were a compromise, such as having national standards for licensure as opposed to them being different in each state? I could understand that. What I'm not getting, is that you are attempting to define "nurse" and stating at least in part that this could be done by eliminating LPNs and ASNs. Both of whose scopes of practice are varying from state to state.
    If you are saying that this is part of the problem, I agree.
    Do I think BSNs are being dragged down by ASNs and LPNs merely by being lumped in with them- no I don't, seeing the wage margins and employment opportunities of BSNs are the best they've been in years.
  3. by   Nurse89
    Oh, this again...wonder who initiated it all back up again.
    So, now the focus is on eliminating Associates degree NURSES as well as Licensed Practical NURSES? hmm,,, are you suggesting maybe we "keep" the NURSES we have now and initiate this in the future? Or just eliminate all the ADN's and LPN's who are currently Licensed asap? Awaiting your response
  4. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Now i'll unsuscribe this thread, the original subject matter was pertaining to LPN positions being eliminated from facilities, and a question if it was going on in other areas as well. It's strayed, i'm partly at fault for it, but i refuse to continue to read or post along the line of "this is better than that" when that's not the reason why this thread wasstarted in the first place.
  5. by   Nurse89
    I agree, this thread has gone way off topic many many times.
    We might need a forum for "change and all the other topics" that have been posted here.

    I have never posted on this thread because I thought it was inflammatory pretty much all along. So now I, too, have contributed, if only to express my opinion, and to ask...that if it this topic of discussion is so very very crucial and is brought up again and again by the same ppl, what "exactly" do those who feed into this propose should be done?
  6. by   sbic56
    It's too bad that anybody becomes inflamed over this discussion, but I totally understand why. I hated being looked down on when I was an LPN working in a hospital, but receiving such recognition when became an RN was nearly as annoying. It was as if all of a sudden I was a real nurse. So what had I been for those 13 years prior as an LPN then? I learned very little in the RN upgrade program, but I am now making around $7 an hour more for performing in nearly the same capacity as I was as an LPN, so that helped me get over my disgust. Like I said, I went on to get the RN for job security in OB, but I got alot more than that. Peace of mind. Looking back, I say to myself, "What took you so long, girl?!"
  7. by   healingtouchRN
    we don't have LPN's in my CCU but I know I love the one's on our step down floor, we really do have respect for each other. :kiss
  8. by   Nurse89
    Yes, it is too bad that ppl become inflamed, but ppl are ppl. The thread went from one thing to a whole opposite pole so I guess it's expected. I am sorry you were looked down upon when you were an LPN working in a hospital.
    That is not everyone's case... Some others actually look up to the LPN's.. Sorry that was not your case.
    I have posted 3 times to this post (today only) and those will be my last replies lol
    This thread has become ridiculous, IMO
  9. by   ainz
    The original post talked about a hospital's decision to eliminate LPN positions. There are many reasons that a hospital would consider doing this.

    It is always my hope that we can engage in intelligent dialogue to understand things, learn things, share experiences, share different points of view as mature people. I suppose at times that is difficult.

    I do not "look down" on anyone, LPNs, nursing assistants, ADNs, no one. I do not have a general view that all people who are LPNs are inferior in some way.

    The point is this, for the profession of nursing to advance we must clearly define the one path of education to become a "nurse." There is no judgment of others in this statement.

    This is related to the original post in that hospital leaders must consider scopes of practice, costs of various skill mixes, and what type of skill mix they can get the most from. Evidently this hospital felt that by having all RNs there would be no limitations on the nurses' scope in terms of LPN or RN. It is not a personal issue but an issue of what kind of services a nurse can provide.
  10. by   fergus51
    Have you all ever noticed that everyone thinks the level they are at is what should be the minimum to become a nurse?
  11. by   azgirl
    Fergus that is so true.
  12. by   pickledpepperRN
    It is true for many.
    I was a CNA, LVN, ADN, and now a BSN. Grad school- did not finish. Took course work and learned a lot that could have led to a CNS, but I quit.

    The minimum level is what qualifies a person to be licensed as a nurse. An LV/PN IS a licensed nurse.
    A registered nurse IS a nurse.

    The ANA and others have said entry level should be the BSN. Nothing wrong with that except there are less programs now for entry level BSN students. (example the program i attended required an RN license for admission).

    The other obsticle is money. How can a person be a good parent, work to support a family, AND go to school?
    I did but only after my kids were in highschool.

    To me a hospital is making a terrible error if they lay off LVN/LPNs rather than assist them to become RNs.
    Those who want to remain LPNs contribute valuable care to patients. They should be assistive to the RN not assigned total patient care.

    Replacing LPNs with unlicensed personnel is harmful tp patients.
    The public needs to know that.
  13. by   Brownms46
    Originally posted by ainz
    The original post talked about a hospital's decision to eliminate LPN positions. There are many reasons that a hospital would consider doing this.

    It is always my hope that we can engage in intelligent dialogue to understand things, learn things, share experiences, share different points of view as mature people. I suppose at times that is difficult.

    I do not "look down" on anyone, LPNs, nursing assistants, ADNs, no one. I do not have a general view that all people who are LPNs are inferior in some way.

    The point is this, for the profession of nursing to advance we must clearly define the one path of education to become a "nurse." There is no judgment of others in this statement.

    This is related to the original post in that hospital leaders must consider scopes of practice, costs of various skill mixes, and what type of skill mix they can get the most from. Evidently this hospital felt that by having all RNs there would be no limitations on the nurses' scope in terms of LPN or RN. It is not a personal issue but an issue of what kind of services a nurse can provide.
    Good post! I do think it would best for this profession to decide once and for all, what is and isn't the entry level for nursing. Then once done make that the law of the land. But I also feel there should be some assistance given to those who entered in other levels, to obtain the then current entry level.

    This would not only stop the PTB from playing one group against the other, and states from having differing policies on who can do what, and who can't. It would save a whole lot of the current confusion, and maybe even help decrease the so-called " nursing shortage"

    Why keep throwing aside knowledgeable people with experience, and seeking to bring in new inexperience people??? Makes no sense to me at all! I thnk those who have proved they're an asset to nursing, should be given the opportnity to continue in their positions, and not cast aside when the money pockets decide nursing is costing too much. Then maybe we can all fight together for nursing in a concerted voice, without all the class in fighting that continues to hinder our progress.

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