What nuring specialty is more marketable as a legal nurse consultant? - page 2

I have been under the impression that med/surg experience is the most valuable. Am I right?... Read More

  1. by   Rose_RN,MSN
    I am going to say that it depends on what you want to specialize in...Personally, I see geriatrics as the area with the highest growth rate due to our 'aging' population. Also, I have experience in Med-Surg/Telemetry, LTC and Home care...so, I've seen several sides of the coin...I am in the process of begining the CLNC program. I think any field/fields will come in handy...because at the base of it all is making prudent nursing decisions and being able to document properly.
  2. by   sirI
    Quote from Havin' A Party!
    Hi, Siri!

    Do believe your situation may be a bit different from that of someone just starting out. You've got years of clinical experience, advanced credentials, LNC expertise, and multiple resources and contacts in the biz... attorneys and other LNCs. And, as a result of all the above, tremendous personal confidence.

    Someone new at this "game" is likely to be interviewed intensely by the representing attorney on their first meeting. In the process, he'll be seeking to obtain a solid feeling from the person before him that she's qualified and knowledgeable in the area he needs her assistance in now... since she's a totally an unknown quantity to him (or to everyone, for that matter) as a brand new LNC.

    IOW, if she can't relate to the specifics of the area of litigation he'll be quizzing her on relating to his current case, that warm fuzzy connection isn't gonna happen. End result: no contract.

    Her telling him that she has contacts with other LNCs in the focus area won't be very convincing in her early career, IMHO. Once she's established, as you are, his trust of her professionalism will be based on the previous work she's put forth.
    Hello, Havin' A Party,

    We all are critiqued during interview. Yes, if the LNC cannot "carry" the conversation, chances are she/he will not be utilized and an opportunity missed. But, we as nurses who go into this program, for the most part, should know how to properly "pass" the interview, just on our resume'/CV alone.

    Now, during the interview, at least in my experience, there is no conversation/investigation regarding medical/nursing knowledge. The attorney really doesn't know what type of nursing/medical questions to ask of the LNC for he/she has zero experience in that area. The questions normally are , "what can you do for me", "how much do you charge", "why should I even need an LNC", ......????? The expertise to actually review a case and report the case comes later when the attorney needs the LNC. Then, when the LNC turns in the final product, the attorney usually gets a feel then what that particular LNC can/cannot provide. That's rather scary, too. For the attorney-client and the LNC. If that attorney is not impressed and cannot properly litigate that case because the LNC did not understand the gravity of the case and/or not know how to prepare the case, well.........

    Really, if the LNC is properly prepared with the answers to all of the attorney's questions about the LNC profession, possesses a professional-looking resume'/CV, has professional-looking tools of the trade (business cards, marketing tools, etc. ) and, dresses the part, most attorneys will be impressed and desire that LNCs services.

    And, yes......experience carries much weight in the preparation of the final product.

    Thank you for the kind words, Havin' A Party. I apprecitate that. :imbar
    Last edit by sirI on Feb 4, '06
  3. by   mpnt
    I have been a CLNC for several years and recently left a plaintiff's law firm after 17 years to return to school full time for my MSN in clinical systems management. To answer the questions regarding what type of experience is necessary or the best type of nursing experience for a nurse interested in entering the field of LNC - I would say that it really doesn't matter as long as you have some clinical experience. Clinical experience is important in order to understand the delivery of healthcare, its outcomes, and who are all the players in our very complicated health care system.

    However, what is absolutely essentially is RESEARCH skills to find the most relevant and VALID medical and nursing literature/evidence specific to a case, the ability to critically think and appraise the evidence in order to support a case, and excellent written and oral communication skills.

    I would also recommend the Legal Nurse Consulting Principles and Practice text from the AALNC - it is informative and has information regarding reseaching and analyzing a case and also has examples of forms necessary to do a case medical chronology, etc.

    Good luck....
  4. by   sirI
    Quote from mpnt
    i have been a clnc for several years and recently left a plaintiff's law firm after 17 years to return to school full time for my msn in clinical systems management. to answer the questions regarding what type of experience is necessary or the best type of nursing experience for a nurse interested in entering the field of lnc - i would say that it really doesn't matter as long as you have some clinical experience. clinical experience is important in order to understand the delivery of healthcare, its outcomes, and who are all the players in our very complicated health care system.

    however, what is absolutely essentially is research skills to find the most relevant and valid medical and nursing literature/evidence specific to a case, the ability to critically think and appraise the evidence in order to support a case, and excellent written and oral communication skills.

    i would also recommend the legal nurse consulting principles and practice text from the aalnc - it is informative and has information regarding reseaching and analyzing a case and also has examples of forms necessary to do a case medical chronology, etc.

    good luck....
    hellom mpnt and welcome to allnurses.com and the legal nurse forum

    great to have you. and, wonderful words of wisdom.

    do you plan to continue work as legal nurse consultant?

    i wish you luck in your pursuit of the msn.

    please come back and share more of your wisdom.

    enjoy the forums.
  5. by   peblz521
    In my experience over the past 4 years, attorneys seem to be most impressed with my background in Neuro and Trauma ICU along with orthopedics. But I agree with the postings I have seen as to not turning something down due to lack of a lot of experience in the field. I worked on an extremely interesting and complex brachial plexus birth injury involving doctors in the military, which in turn made it a federal court case. I do not have any "nursing" experience in that area, but I tell you what, it wasn't difficult to learn. Any LNC worth her salt is going to be exceptional at research and have an intense desire to learn. This area (Legal) of my nursing career has been so rewarding in that I have learned so much more during the research and studying phase of each case and I am so astonished at how little I feel like I really knew working as a nurse in ICU and on the floor. Probably some of this is due to the fact that in my research phase of each case, I read "medical" peer-reviewed literature and study the diseases intensly. Good luck to anyone who wants to get into this area of nursing, it's a blast!
  6. by   sirI
    Quote from peblz521
    in my experience over the past 4 years, attorneys seem to be most impressed with my background in neuro and trauma icu along with orthopedics. but i agree with the postings i have seen as to not turning something down due to lack of a lot of experience in the field. i worked on an extremely interesting and complex brachial plexus birth injury involving doctors in the military, which in turn made it a federal court case. i do not have any "nursing" experience in that area, but i tell you what, it wasn't difficult to learn. any lnc worth her salt is going to be exceptional at research and have an intense desire to learn. this area (legal) of my nursing career has been so rewarding in that i have learned so much more during the research and studying phase of each case and i am so astonished at how little i feel like i really knew working as a nurse in icu and on the floor. probably some of this is due to the fact that in my research phase of each case, i read "medical" peer-reviewed literature and study the diseases intensly. good luck to anyone who wants to get into this area of nursing, it's a blast!
    hello, peblz521 and welcome to allnurses.com and the legal nurse forum

    you hit the nail on the head. excellent post. so glad to have you with us. and, we look forward to seeing more of your posts. enjoy!

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