IV Drugs by District Nurses?

  1. Do you think it is a good idea for DN or practice nurses provide IV drugs for community patients? This would to save patients from being unneccessarily admited for relatively minor infections that are not responding to oral antibiotics.

    Your thoughts please.
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   Whisper
    I think it seems like a good idea, however it seems like it could have a lot of teething problems, I mean most DN don't touch meddies, so Iv's would create a lot more work and demands on time.

    I was out with a district nurse the other day and we were talking about this, and she said she would be happy, because she used to do this when she worked abroad, and saw how it could help patients when they didn't have to leave their homes,to go into hospital.

    whisper
  4. by   karenG
    we are working towards having DN's give Iv's at home. there are arguments about maintaining competency at giving the things so have roped in the ambulance service to teach and supervise initially. we like thinking out of the box where I work!

    Karen
  5. by   tony summers
    Karen

    What are looking at being able to treat in the community, what are the restrictions going to be?

    Tony
  6. by   karenG
    Hi Tony

    its not all been decided yet- but looking to give IV abs for a start. will find out how far we've gone and let you know!

    Karen
  7. by   JNJ
    I've been working in the USA for 15 years, but am/was a UK acute, then community RN. The USA has been doing IV drugs in the community for ever. Sometimes the formulations are a little different to make things a little easier for the community nurse e.g. I get IV filgrastim for my post BMT peds. patient in a pressurized bag that can be tucked into the child's clothing and will empty itself without a pump or gravity.

    We also maintain a totally needle free household as there is another child in the home. This can offer challenges in getting appropriate supplies from time to time.

    This child is often admitted for fever and neutropenia for a few days, but we finish the IV Keflex & Vanco. at home after discharge. Of course, she has a PICC line in which helps. It's also fairly common to administer TPN at home to adults and peds.

    I'm not sure how many central lines the UK is leaving in community patients. It might be a great deal of hassle if nearly every IV med. given is a new start in the UK.

    Hope this helps inform your discussions.
  8. by   Lynne H
    Quote from tony summers
    Do you think it is a good idea for DN or practice nurses provide IV drugs for community patients? This would to save patients from being unneccessarily admited for relatively minor infections that are not responding to oral antibiotics.

    Your thoughts please.
    Hi Tony. The delivery of IV drugs to community patients presents no problems provided training and supervised practice is available to all who wish to extend their role in this field..
  9. by   Lynne H
    Quote from Whisper
    I think it seems like a good idea, however it seems like it could have a lot of teething problems, I mean most DN don't touch meddies, so Iv's would create a lot more work and demands on time.

    I was out with a district nurse the other day and we were talking about this, and she said she would be happy, because she used to do this when she worked abroad, and saw how it could help patients when they didn't have to leave their homes,to go into hospital.

    whisper
    Hi There, although we DN's don't 'handle medicines' we still need to know the indications for use and any side effects/complications that could arise and affect the health and well being of our patients. Therefore our knowledge of medicines remains the same as those in the hospital setting
  10. by   Gail-Anne
    We have had a home IV program for many years. Many of our pts administer there own meds at home. Our home care nurses don't start IV's, so if someone is on peripheral, they have to return to hospital for restarts. We use a lot of PICCs, sometimes meds by gravity, sometimes by continous pump, Usually antibiotics. Home care nurses may check-up on first day, or just do weekly checks and PICC drsg changes or sometimes daily visits to change med bag in pump for people not able to do that themselves. It is very cost friendly, compared to people staying in hospital. Also, not many people want to stay in hospital longer than needed. So, lots of options. We use totally "needleless" systems. We have 24hr IVTeam coverage at the hospital people can phone if needed and specific nurse and pharmasist who do the teaching and co-ordinate everything,

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