2011 passers, no experience. ANY suggestions or anything we can do to start our prof - pg.2 | allnurses

2011 passers, no experience. ANY suggestions or anything we can do to start our prof - page 3

2011 passers, no experience. ANY suggestions or anything we can do to start our proffesion. i'm really confused and clueless.:confused: please any nurse here who has a job tell there story on how... Read More

  1. Visit  dodoy profile page
    0
    I have to agree with Summerstarsky with regards to giving yourself an edge by getting your feet wet in the real hospital setting. At some point, you'll realize doing volunteer work somehow presents to you the real world of nursing, because it is totally different with your clinicals. Responsibilities are bigger, and hence the liability. Not that I'm in favor of volunteerism (sometimes the boundaries blur, and it turns to exploitation) . What I'm just trying to say is that it broadens your abilities and capabilities as a nurse compared to what you were when you're still a fresh grad. Got that? You know very well that "Orientation programs for new hires" aren't very common here. That's where the importance of volunteer work enters.

    Again, I'm saying that, somehow doing volunteer work isn't too bad at all, but then again, I'm not totally in favor of it (especially when it turns to exploitation). Oh well, what a conundrum! I don't want red flags. =p

    To answer your query, attending trainings and seminars has been the common pathway for new grads. As mentioned by some posters (which I myself agree), it gives you the edge. However, being a registered nurse already, it means that you are given the permission to work as a nurse in the Philippines as stated in the law. I suggest you lodge as may applications as you can on hospitals which are hiring staff nurses (not volunteer work), then try to upgrade yourself while waiting. In this waiting period, try to formulate some plan B just in case you receive no response.

    *Just a tip. In the part where you will be sending out your resumes, try to make your resume stand out from the rest. In the hospital where I work, I frequently see the resume of the walk in applicants, and they are all almost the same. Objectives searched, copied and pasted straight from the internet, sample cover letters slightly edited. You name them. Make it an individualized/personal document, and try to back the things you wrote up in there when an interview is conducted.

    Hope this helps! I wish you all the best in your nursing career! God Bless you!

    P.S.
    I'm not trying to be a moderator here and I mean no harm to you matty2011, but may I suggest you try posting here with pure English, and spell them right. It spells some professionalism.
  2. Visit  kamae profile page
    0
    I can relate.. I'm a 2009 BSN graduate here in the Philippines and have no clinical job experience whatsoever. I worked as a front desk officer in a hotel just so I could feel how it is to work with salary. Then I resigned and decided to give nursing a chance. I trained for 3 months in a dialysis center and then got some extra training/seminars. I also pursued a master's degree in nursing.

    My advice is you should definitely equip yourself with training, seminars and maybe some extra units from a masters program. Then just send your applications to every health institution in sight. Try also to send your application to companies who might be in need of a company nurse. Training/Volunteering in hospitals or health institutions is a good idea because there is a chance they might hire you if they're impressed with your performance. I also read about military nursing here: http://allnurses.com/philippine-nurs...046-page2.html.

    I'm leaving this November for Canada on a 2-year student visa. Hopefully, things go well and I'll be able to stay and work as a nurse or practical nurse. If you can, try the student visa route. Canada has a nice program for international students to stay and work after graduation. You might want to look into that. If I found about it earlier after graduation, I would have applied earlier.

    Hope this helps.
  3. Visit  ned1968 profile page
    0
    Hi Kamae,

    what course are you taking in Canada? did you get an agency to process your papers?or did you process it by yourself?TIA
  4. Visit  Silverdragon102 profile page
    0
    Quote from kamae
    I can relate.. I'm a 2009 BSN graduate here in the Philippines and have no clinical job experience whatsoever. I worked as a front desk officer in a hotel just so I could feel how it is to work with salary. Then I resigned and decided to give nursing a chance. I trained for 3 months in a dialysis center and then got some extra training/seminars. I also pursued a master's degree in nursing.

    My advice is you should definitely equip yourself with training, seminars and maybe some extra units from a masters program. Then just send your applications to every health institution in sight. Try also to send your application to companies who might be in need of a company nurse. Training/Volunteering in hospitals or health institutions is a good idea because there is a chance they might hire you if they're impressed with your performance. I also read about military nursing here: http://allnurses.com/philippine-nurs...046-page2.html.

    I'm leaving this November for Canada on a 2-year student visa. Hopefully, things go well and I'll be able to stay and work as a nurse or practical nurse. If you can, try the student visa route. Canada has a nice program for international students to stay and work after graduation. You might want to look into that. If I found about it earlier after graduation, I would have applied earlier.

    Hope this helps.
    Not sure what you are doing as a student however you must have so many hours experience in the last (usually) 5 years to register with one of the provincial colleges and meet requirements and you will be asked work experience in the last 5 years
  5. Visit  kamae profile page
    0
    Quote from Silverdragon102
    Not sure what you are doing as a student however you must have so many hours experience in the last (usually) 5 years to register with one of the provincial colleges and meet requirements and you will be asked work experience in the last 5 years
    Thanks. I called CNO and they told me that if I am able to prove my BSN degree in the Philippines (But I must have graduated in the last 5 years) then I will be eligible to take the Practical Nursing licensure exam. But they'll only be registering me once I have a status of having a work visa. I asked if work experience will be an issue, they told me that in my case, they will only be assessing my education (since I am a BSN graduate) and it is considered equivalent to PN. But the story changes if I graduated more than 5 years ago, that's when they will ask for work experience. At least that's what the customer rep told me. I also called saskatchewan and that is what they told me as well, except the customer rep said that they will issue a license if I pass the exam and it is up to whatever immigration status I have for me to be able to use my license to find a job. I don't know about other provinces though. With that, I have decided to change my course since I realized I no longer need the PN program to qualify for an examination. I'm still in the process of looking for a medical-related course.
  6. Visit  Ar-en profile page
    0
    Hi so we just had our IVT at fabella, but not yet finish with our completion, anyway im having a dillema on whether to take acls, cus I want to be practical especially, that all the trainings are on-hold. So i think it might not be ideal to take the acls now cus for one, its expensive and I personally think its mot really needed now. SO WHAT DO YOU THINK?
  7. Visit  Summerstarsky profile page
    1
    Quote from Ar-en
    Hi so we just had our IVT at fabella, but not yet finish with our completion, anyway im having a dillema on whether to take acls, cus I want to be practical especially, that all the trainings are on-hold. So i think it might not be ideal to take the acls now cus for one, its expensive and I personally think its mot really needed now. SO WHAT DO YOU THINK?
    I actually felt the same way back when I was in your situation, I've decided not to take it at the moment since its a bit costly plus the fact that it has expiration (talking about the license). Though it is, without a doubt, a plus factor that you can brag about in your resume but if you are on a tight budget, I suggest that you take it if it's already needed once you get hired. I had a friend who only took hers when she got in to a private hospital and they required her to have one, of course she's responsible for paying for it. That's just my opinion
    Ar-en likes this.
  8. Visit  Ar-en profile page
    0
    Quote from kamae
    I can relate.. I'm a 2009 BSN graduate here in the Philippines and have no clinical job experience whatsoever. I worked as a front desk officer in a hotel just so I could feel how it is to work with salary. Then I resigned and decided to give nursing a chance. I trained for 3 months in a dialysis center and then got some extra training/seminars. I also pursued a master's degree in nursing.

    My advice is you should definitely equip yourself with training, seminars and maybe some extra units from a masters program. Then just send your applications to every health institution in sight. Try also to send your application to companies who might be in need of a company nurse. Training/Volunteering in hospitals or health institutions is a good idea because there is a chance they might hire you if they're impressed with your performance. I also read about military nursing here: http://allnurses.com/philippine-nurs...046-page2.html.

    I'm leaving this November for Canada on a 2-year student visa. Hopefully, things go well and I'll be able to stay and work as a nurse or practical nurse. If you can, try the student visa route. Canada has a nice program for international students to stay and work after graduation. You might want to look into that. If I found about it earlier after graduation, I would have applied earlier. !

    Hope this helps.
    thanks kamae!. Wow good for you congrats kamae. Actually my friends and I are planning to go to australia once we have our experiences and equipt with the skills and knowledge to perform as a staff, but that will be a long time ), anyhoo the "program" dunno how to call it, but our program is to be a trainee there at australia with allowance, apartment and all that. But still the position for being a staff nurse will still depend on your performanc there are no assurance that you'll be absorb. My friend told me we will be student there, student as a trainee in the hospital. Sorry if its too confusing . Anyway good luck and GOD bless in canada


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