ADN/Associates RN Jobs in Chicago?

  1. 0
    I am considering attending the 2 year Associates/ADN Nursing program at the City Colleges. I already have a bachelor's degree and would like to get my associates RN then earn my MSN while working. (RN-MSN bridge programs) But if finding work as an associates RN in Chicago is unrealistic, that plan would change. It seems that most, if not all of the big hospitals in the area are magnet status and require a BSN for entry level nurses.

    My question is, if that is the case, are new associates level RN graduates able to find jobs in Chicago?

    I would love to hear the thoughts and experiences of new and experienced associates level RNs on finding work in the Chicago area.

    Thanks for your thoughts/insights
  2. 10 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    It is really hard to get a nursing with an ADN in Chicago.
  4. 0
    It depends on the hospital.

    This is what I've found:

    Some are BSN only. Some prefer BSN, but will hire ADN. Some require that an ADN begin a completion within X years of hire and complete within X years. And then there's the "who you know" factor.

    Across the board for ADNs, I have found that if you already have a hospital job as a CNA/PCT or whatever, you are likely to get hired on as a nurse (possibly with the BSN completion stipulation).
  5. 0
    I have experienced that most hospitals are on their journey to magnet status and have stopped hiring ADN nurses. I have heard of them hiring ADN if they were a pct on a floor but not much else. Frankly I can't understand how the community colleges are able to
    Stay in business with their ADN programs. I guess there are enough nursing homes out there that need nurses!
  6. 0
    There is absolutely no requirement for nurses to be BSN by magnet except nurse managers, and the chief nursing officer must have masters. It is simply something hospitals says because job market is bad right now.

    Don't worry about my username, it's old, before I start ripping some things, I'll soon be a BSN and already hold a BS, so I'm not turning this into ADN vs BSN thing. At the end of the day, get the BSN, but:

    Roughly 60% of new nurses are ADN so ADN isn't going anywhere soon. If ADN programs shut down, there would be a massive nursing shortage crisis. (According to NCSBN, in 2012, there were 150,266 US educated that passed the NCLEX. 62,535 were BSN and 84,517 were ADN. The rest were Diploma program or something else)

    I went ADN and ADN-BSN route because I will be far less in debt than if I went to some of these 4 year schools. The ADN program I went to is also arguably the best nursing school in the state too. Better than most of the 4 year institutions in IL.

    And I am employed by a hospital, not a nursing home, but I was a PCT in fairness.

    If you're young and 1st time to college and you have the means to do it, go 4 year route, fine. There is nothing wrong going ADN route though, but in this tougher economy hospitals can pick BSN's if they want. They don't have to pay them a dime more. The magnet thing is total bull. The real truth has more to do with not having to pay for completion.
    Last edit by adnrnstudent on Feb 4, '13
  7. 0
    Quote from adnrnstudent
    There is absolutely no requirement for nurses to be BSN by magnet except nurse managers, and the chief nursing officer must have masters. It is simply something hospitals says because job market is bad right now.

    Don't worry about my username, it's old, before I start ripping some things, I'll soon be a BSN and already hold a BS, so I'm not turning this into ADN vs BSN thing. At the end of the day, get the BSN, but:

    Roughly 60% of new nurses are ADN so ADN isn't going anywhere soon. If ADN programs shut down, there would be a massive nursing shortage crisis. (According to NCSBN, in 2012, there were 150,266 US educated that passed the NCLEX. 62,535 were BSN and 84,517 were ADN. The rest were Diploma program or something else)

    I went ADN and ADN-BSN route because I will be far less in debt than if I went to some of these 4 year schools. The ADN program I went to is also arguably the best nursing school in the state too. Better than most of the 4 year institutions in IL.

    And I am employed by a hospital, not a nursing home, but I was a PCT in fairness.

    If you're young and 1st time to college and you have the means to do it, go 4 year route, fine. There is nothing wrong going ADN route though, but in this tougher economy hospitals can pick BSN's if they want. They don't have to pay them a dime more. The magnet thing is total bull. The real truth has more to do with not having to pay for completion.
    It is my understanding that BSN nurses receive more points than ADN in the magnet process. So where you are somewhat correct there is a requirement for BSN in magnet.

    BSN students just get a more rounded education than ADN students. Not one is less of a nurse than the other but one is more sought after.
  8. 0
    Quote from mc-lovin

    It is my understanding that BSN nurses receive more points than ADN in the magnet process. So where you are somewhat correct there is a requirement for BSN in magnet.

    BSN students just get a more rounded education than ADN students. Not one is less of a nurse than the other but one is more sought after.
    What's your definition of rounded education?
  9. 0
    Think of everything you are learning in your ADN-BSN bridge classes. We learned that the first time around. No need to take another 2 years to learn it.
  10. 0
    Quote from mc-lovin
    Think of everything you are learning in your ADN-BSN bridge classes. We learned that the first time around. No need to take another 2 years to learn it.
    Are u referring to gen eds? I have a BS but in a adn program currently. So I'm just trying to figure out what is left out btw the two?
  11. 0
    Since you already have a BA or BS, consider a MSN entry program. Or, I know there used to be BSN programs for those already with degrees, not sure if they're still around.


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