New grad RN panic attacks

  1. 1
    I graduated nursing school in spring 2013 and moved out to Nevada to get acute care experience and I am currently working on a surgical orthopedics unit. I've been working for three months now, just finished my orientation period, and am frustrated beyond belief with my job, my co-workers, everything. Nothing in nursing school prepared me for what it would be like to be a 'real' nurse. The surgeons are rude to the nurses, the nurses gossip about each other and are all 20 + years older than I and aren't friendly or answer my questions when I ask. The patients are all demanding a hilton like experience - I feel more like a drug dealer/waitress than a nurse who is helping people in need. All this in addition to moving to a new location where I don't know anyone is making me having what feels like endless bouts of panic attacks. I dread going to work, I found myself wishing that truck would hit me so I wouldn't have to go in to work. I get nauseous and light-headed and I'm exhausted 24/7 and just hate the direction my life is at right now. I don't want to hate my job, I don't know how to make it better. I absolutely loved my nursing preceptorship in the ER -- enjoyed going each day. Everyone worked well together, the docs, nurses, techs, all to help the patients achieve the best outcomes and then send them on their way (either upstairs to a unit or home). I don't know if nursing just isn't for me or if it's just the environment i'm in. If it's the environment, how do I survive getting my 'experience' so I can go on to other jobs?
    KimberlyRN89 likes this.
  2. 978 Visits
    Find Similar Topics
  3. 6 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Believe it not Panda, the environment doesn't sound that bad. It's more likely reality shock.
    Exercise and a sense of humor will get you through the waiting period until you can make your move to the ER.

    I would not share this with anyone at work. Please talk to your doctor though.
  5. 0
    Hang in there for 6 months, then transfer to the ER. And, please, do talk to your doctor! I don't think the environment you work in sounds very normal, but then again, I haven't ever worked in acute care. I started in LTC. (((HUGS)))
  6. 0
    Awww, keep your head up! I'm a fairly new nurse too! In NYC there's no shot at starting in a hospital and when all I had was my ASN I couldn't get into anything clinical based. I took a job doing community assessment for a medicaid managed long term care. I am so far away from what my expectations were, most days I feel so sad and lost! We just need to keep working hard and get our experience. I have to believe the doors will start to open. Don't let others discourage you, you worked hard to get where you are! Good luck!
  7. 0
    Been there,done that,
    I see you have 30 years experience in case management. I would love to pick your brain. I posted a topic earlier, http://allnurses.com/general-nursing...-i-910767.html
    I know it's a little on the long side, but if you could spare some time, I would be FOREVER grateful! If not no worries, thank you any way!
  8. 0
    Been there,done that,
    I see you have 30 years experience in case management. I would love to pick your brain. I posted a topic earlier, http://allnurses.com/general-nursing...-i-910767.html
    I know it's a little on the long side, but if you could spare some time, I would be FOREVER grateful! If not no worries, thank you any way!
  9. 0
    Hang in there! I came from Ca to NV to work in acute care because after 3years still unable to get into a hospital. I had a lot of the same feelings as you. I wld want to throw up before work everyday. I felt like I was putting my license at risk and no one had time to show me anything or answer any questions. The 6th month point was when I started feeling ok and had a idea what was going on. I actually started picking up extra shifts! Which I never thought was possible. And then I was able to make my transfer to my dream department. Nursey! It was kinda like boot camp. Was very hard but made me a better nurse.


Top