Navy Reserve Nursing Navy Reserve Nursing | allnurses

Navy Reserve Nursing

  1. 9 Hello to all out there in the all nurses community. As suggested by my login I am a Navy Nursing Program Manager. What that means is that I function at a HQ level - above the recruiters and below the board. I decided to get on here because I am noticing there are so many answers and discussions regarding military nursing, and they can tend to be very confusing when multiple people answer and confuse the branch, desired affiliation, and actual question. I am on here to try and help out both my recruiters and my potential peers. My goal is to try and check this at least one a week on Monday nights, and more often if I can. Ask anything you wish. What I ask in return is that you ask a specific question with as much detail as possible. My fellow recruiters do an amazing job given that I update information constantly and this changes their lives from day to day as it sometimes does yours. Give me a chance to explain what you are most confused on, but in the end it is the recruiter you will be working with and through if you choose this life as your path. Once I figure out how to blog I am going to try that also. Let me know if there is a specific topic or post you would like and I can try that too. Best wishes to all, and I hope this helps :-) Ciao, Ciao
    LT, NC, USN
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  2. 62 Comments

  3. Visit  RN1023 profile page
    #1 0
    Hi. I am considering joining the Navy Nurse Reserves Corp. I have been doing some research online, but I am not ready to contact a recruiter. I am currently a med-surg nurse with my BSN and am in school for my MSN in education. I have no prior military experience, but I would very much like to help our troops.

    What at opportunities exist for reserve nurses (ie bedside, training of staff,)?

    What is really happens during the 12 day training in Rhode Island? I read somewhere about having to roll around a sandbox with pigeon poo. How are the drill instructors? I read that they are constantly in your face.

    Do all nurses receive the same rank or is degree a factor in rank?

    How many years is the commitment? I read that it's 8 years if you have no military experience, but then I also read it's 3 years for nurses.

    Do you pick your weekends each month? What are these weekends like?

    Do you pick your 2 weeks each year? What are these 2 weeks like?

    If deployed, do you have options as to where you go?

    I heard that deployed navy reserve nurses are used to fill vacancies for active duty staff who have been deployed overseas. Is that a typical deployment?

    Thank you very much for your time. I truly appreciate it.
  4. Visit  PsychGuy profile page
    #2 1
    Awesome. Thank you for taking the time to do this. Some back story: When I finished my BSN and got my RN license two years ago (am a nontrad student/career changer) I met with an officer/health professions recruiter for USNR. We talked a few times, I submitted all the paperwork (yes, all of it), and no one has been clear if the recruiter resigned her commission (was 0-3) or changed billets. I got busy with life, the ball was dropped, and I never heard from anyone again. I could add more to it, but that's unnecessary.

    Next May (2015), I will graduate with my MSN and take (and pass) the ANCC board to become a psychiatric-mental health nurse practitioner. By that time, I will have worked three years as a full-time RN with my BSN (and another BS). In 2012, the Lt. mentioned that the psych NP was in huge demand with the navy and there only a handful of psych NPs in the entire navy. She mentioned that even in the reserve the opportunities to promotion to captain would likely be present. Also, by that time I should come is as an 0-2 with time in toward 0-3 or 0-3 iteslf according to what information I was given surrounding constructive credit.

    1. Are you able to corroborate any of that? Is the need still present? Literature suggests mental health providers/prescribers are at an all time high both in the civilian sector and military realm.

    2. Are there still any financial incentives to choosing the navy or navy reserve specifically? I realize that there is no shortage of nurses applying to get in, however, psych NPs are in short supply so maybe. Sign on bonuses, loan repayment, etc?

    3. The prospect of monthly drill, at this stage, seems exciting, and I want to participate. At my nearest duty station in my landlocked country, it's been described that Saturdays would generally consist of determining fitness for PT, immunizations, and other force readiness with Sundays death by PowerPoint. Do you know if this is generally the case particularly since my specialty is/will be psychiatry? Also, the Lt. originally described that my own continuing medical education and even practice could count in place of monthly drill if needed. Still true?

    4. I spoke recently to a petty officer in another state covering my region for health professions recruitment, and he explained the options to take an active duty billet fairly well. I'm open to that, and I think my soon to be wife is as well particularly in the more interesting places to live. Can you fill me in on what areas could I likely deploy to for active duty? Basically, where are the psych NPs? My summer station would apparently be Pensacola, FWIW.

    Also, are there other training opportunities for the APNs in the navy? I started out a long time ago as a paramedic, and my interests don't lie solely in mental health, although getting to this point has been an interesting and surprising evolution, so is training also available for combat trauma, TNCC, ACLS other military medicine related topics, and things beyond "knife and fork school?"

    That all addresses USNR mostly, as that's been and still is my chief interest, but recently I've began looking at active duty options so if this mostly extrapolates to that realm as well let me know. I realize those are very specific questions, but it's the stuff I'd like to know that no one has been able to tell me. I've filled out all the papers before and have access to all of the timeline information. I'm curious about the board review though.

    Let it be said, I want to provide military nursing to be a military member and officer. I've respected and wanted military commitment for a long time, but I'm red-green color blind which DQ'd me from most of the things I was interested in doing previously in life (surface warfare, aviation, even intel). I don't feel like it's an issue as a nurse, and no one else has made any hiccups in my research about it being an issue so perhaps now I can finally contribute something.
  5. Visit  Haubie profile page
    #3 0
    To add to RN1023's question about rank: Does prior enlisted service help towards starting at a higher initial rank?

    Also, are their fewer opportunities for reserve nursing now that we have less troops deployed?

    Thanks!
  6. Visit  NavyNurseCorpsPM1 profile page
    #4 1
    Hello RN1023. I will try to answer as much of this as I can, but I am Active Duty, so some of the questions I am going to have to find the answers to. I encourage everyone thinking about joining to Google and read the OPNAV 1120.7A April 20 2012 so that they have some basic info.
    In order:
    1. Reserve nurses have the opportunities that they seek out. There are training opportunities, deployment opportunities, and assignment opportunities, but it takes interaction with the assigned NOSC (thier station of assignment). If all anyone wants to accomplish is the minimum 2 weeks, 1 weekend a month, and required points per year then they certainly have that option as well, although I do not recommend this for advancement and training. Specific offereings vary from month to month and depending on support we are providing to worldwide issues.

    2. During the training you are required to learn how to be a sailor in a very short amount of time. 2 weeks is all the time that the instructors have to instill the minimum amount of guidance and preparation, so there is a lot of loud voiced education when you have a group of people who sometimes fail to see the point of making thier bed a certain way. I urge you to watch the UTexas speech given by Admiral William H McRaven (its on YouTube). He very poignantly explains why all of the tedious and mundane tasks you are asked to do during training are not so tedious and mundane. Yes there is goose poop, not pigeon poop, and it is because they are EVERYWHERE!! You must also expect to perform a lot of physical activity in that time.

    3. Not all nurses recieve the same entry rank for Reserves. Degree, prior commissioned time and work experience are a factor. Again...OPNAV 1120.7A. Absolutely no double dipping, so you cannot get work time during school time.

    4. 8 years. 3 are in the SelRes (active reserve) and 5 then in the IRR (inactive reserve). A person my elect to do all 8 in the SelRes but 3 is the minimum.

    5. I do not know...I will have to find out.

    6. Again...I do not know I will find out.

    7. Yes and No. If you go into JO Apply the system that holds all of the billets and send in a request, it is possible to be picked for the assignment. Realize you may be going against 25 other people if there is one assignment to Germany for instance. So in this way you have some control. When we respond to natural disasters, or mobilize for some other unknown then it is possible that you may not have much notice. We go and respond when and where we are needed, and sometimes those needs do not function on our time.

    8. Sometimes. Sometimes they are the ones who get sent forward. It all depends on the mission and need, and that changes and shifts day to day. This is not me being cryptic...this is me trying to explain why one of the main mottos of all military is Semper Gumby...Always flexible.

    Please ask away for any additional questions that may come up. In addition to the OPNAV please google Navy PA116 to read over.

    Ciao Ciao

    LT, NC USN
  7. Visit  NavyNurseCorpsPM1 profile page
    #5 0
    Hello PsychGuy,

    Again, I am not a recruiter, but rather serve as thier flow point and provide them with information.
    In order:
    1. There is indeed still a need for MHNP in the United States Navy Reserves. This need will still be present for FY15

    2. I do not discuss any sort of monetary compensation. Bonus eligibility changes from day to day, and is guided by many things. Only our approved Bonus Shop can provide the exact amounts, and these are only guaranteed when presented a quota and an actual commissioning takes place...prior to that time anything change.

    3. CEU's are on our own time and do not fulfill any requirements except your requirement to maintain your credentials. Monthly drills are a requirement if you expect to remain competative within your peer group and meet your required goals for the reserve corps. The duties you will fill can be addressed by the NOSC you would affiliate with...my suggestion is to contact the reserve center you woud want to be gained at and ask what thier drill cycles are like.

    4. Active duty billets are assigned as need of the Navy dictates. The big 3 (Portsmouth, Bethesda, and Balboa) are always a consideration. Sometimes smaller commands if the commissioned person has enough experience to be on thier own. Overseas may even be an option, but no duty station can be guaranteed by anyone other than a detailer, and you do not negotiate with a detailer until after you have completed the selection process and are awaiting commissioning documents.

    Extras--

    Training opportunities are available, but you have to ask and be willing to wait. There are a lot of those who have been in for years and still waiting to go to specific trainings. We reserve our combat courses for those who are deploying or staging to deploy.

    TNCC, ACLS, Concious Sedation, PALS - all are offered for the active duty and most are required. I do not know about the reserve side.

    I will not discuss the board review process beyond that it is made up of Senior Nurse Corps leaders, and that they provide final input for rank, sub-specialty codes, and acceptance into the Active or Reserve side.

    Medical screening will determine if you meet medical waiver requirements. The Manual of Medicine is what the Navy follows, and this to a T.

    Hope this helps, and please let me know if there are more questions!

    Ciao Ciao
    LT, NC USN
  8. Visit  NavyNurseCorpsPM1 profile page
    #6 0
    Haubie, hello and hope this finds you well.

    No, only commissioned time counts, and that credit is guided by the OPNAV 1120.7A chart.

    Yes and No. Our mission changes, but Congress is who really decides if we can no longer bring in the numbers that we used to. Right now we just need Reserve applicants in certain areas.

    Hope this helps!!!

    Ciao Ciao

    LT, NC USN
  9. Visit  PsychGuy profile page
    #7 0
    It seems like the screws are tightened down more than when I first spoke with another lieutenant about some of these matters. It puts some things into context that makes weighing USNR against say USAR easier. Thanks for the information.

    Quote from NavyNurseCorpsPM1
    Hello PsychGuy,

    Again, I am not a recruiter, but rather serve as thier flow point and provide them with information.
    In order:
    1. There is indeed still a need for MHNP in the United States Navy Reserves. This need will still be present for FY15

    2. I do not discuss any sort of monetary compensation. Bonus eligibility changes from day to day, and is guided by many things. Only our approved Bonus Shop can provide the exact amounts, and these are only guaranteed when presented a quota and an actual commissioning takes place...prior to that time anything change.

    3. CEU's are on our own time and do not fulfill any requirements except your requirement to maintain your credentials. Monthly drills are a requirement if you expect to remain competative within your peer group and meet your required goals for the reserve corps. The duties you will fill can be addressed by the NOSC you would affiliate with...my suggestion is to contact the reserve center you woud want to be gained at and ask what thier drill cycles are like.

    4. Active duty billets are assigned as need of the Navy dictates. The big 3 (Portsmouth, Bethesda, and Balboa) are always a consideration. Sometimes smaller commands if the commissioned person has enough experience to be on thier own. Overseas may even be an option, but no duty station can be guaranteed by anyone other than a detailer, and you do not negotiate with a detailer until after you have completed the selection process and are awaiting commissioning documents.

    Extras--

    Training opportunities are available, but you have to ask and be willing to wait. There are a lot of those who have been in for years and still waiting to go to specific trainings. We reserve our combat courses for those who are deploying or staging to deploy.

    TNCC, ACLS, Concious Sedation, PALS - all are offered for the active duty and most are required. I do not know about the reserve side.

    I will not discuss the board review process beyond that it is made up of Senior Nurse Corps leaders, and that they provide final input for rank, sub-specialty codes, and acceptance into the Active or Reserve side.

    Medical screening will determine if you meet medical waiver requirements. The Manual of Medicine is what the Navy follows, and this to a T.

    Hope this helps, and please let me know if there are more questions!

    Ciao Ciao
    LT, NC USN
  10. Visit  StudentNurse'15 profile page
    #8 0
    Hi NavyNurseCorpsPM1
    I'm currently in nursing school and will be graduating May 2015. However, I will only have an associates degree. I will still have 12-14 months before I graduate with a BSN, so July-September 2016. I love the idea of joining the Navy as a nurse on the active duty side. How early should I contact a recruiter? When I begin my BSN classes can I apply for the Nurse Candidate Program? Do I need any specific kind of nursing experience? What is the initial officer training like when you join, is it like boot camp? What kind of opportunities are there to further my education and become an NP or PA? My husband is a corpsman in the Navy Reserve, will there be any issues with me joining as well? Thanks in advance for all your help!
  11. Visit  jj1ski profile page
    #9 0
    Hi StudenNurse'15,
    I'm not trying to step on any toes here but may I suggest that you tag along with your husband to a drill weekend and speak with some of the reserve nurses in his unit? They could give you multiple opinions on OCS and opportunities to further your education. I'm sure the LT here can answer your questions but it's always good to be able to have an in person discussion with someone in the position that you are interested in.

    -Justin (nursing student and current Navy reserve LT SWO)
  12. Visit  NavyNurseCorpsPM1 profile page
    #10 0
    StudentNurse15…hello and I will try to answer all of the questions, but let me clear up a small bit of confusion that jj1ski may have created. IF you are asking all of these questions with regard to the ACTIVE side of the house, then going to a RESERVE unit to ask questions will not benefit you. They go to DCO school (2 weeks) and not ODS (5 weeks)…two very different things. We do different jobs and have different expectations. You should only go to a RESERVE center if your intention is to join the RESERVES. If it is ACTIVE you are interested in then you can arrange with a recruiter to speak to someone. They will most likely contact me and then I will get in touch with who best would fit your needs and scope of questions. Don't mind the caps…I find a lot of people responding to questions on this site mix up the two, so I just want to be super clear about what you are asking and what I am in turn answering. Here goes for the questions in order:

    1. Earlier is better. There is no reason you cannot pop in to ask the recruiters questions and express interest. It is their job to be out there for potential applicants. Now, that being said let me temper some expectations. For you, you are already out of the NCP window if you maintain the current path. You cannot apply to NCP without a current acceptance letter to a CCNE or ACEN accredited program, and right now you will. If you have that already then you need to get in touch with a recruiter immediately!! If you wait, your projected graduation date puts you as an FY16 grad and we will only be accepting qualified (meaning meets all requirements and physically qualified) applications this year. When you finish your ASN…if that is required prior to knowing your acceptance for the BSN, then we will be well beyond that window. If not the case and you have the BSN acceptance now, then as already stated…get in touch with a recruiter immediately!! We begin accepting theses kits starting Aug 1. America's Navy - A Global Force for Good™ : Navy.com is where to start or you can google Navy Recruiting Districts and try to find out which one would cover your area. If this is in any way confusing let me know.

    2. No experience is needed for NCP because we know you are in school, but again, we only accept certain year groups each fiscal year (Oct 1 - Sept 30) and if you miss your window then your only option becomes to try and apply Direct Accession and that is only if we are accepting applications. If you were going to opt for DA then you do not need experience if you are intending to apply for acceptance immediately after graduation. In your case however, you would need to have the application ready to be finished to correlate with your current projected graduation as you will have to be credentialed. Basically, once you graduate you must be credentialed…be that a day or a year, so having everything ready to go minus that piece would serve you well. Again, assuming you meet all other criteria.

    3. I did not attend ODS. I attended what is known as NSI (8 weeks) because I am prior enlisted and earned my commission through a program that the Navy offered internally. Some of my co-workers attended, and I observed the ODS class while in Newport, RI. 5 weeks of learning how to be an officer is what it boils down to. A LOT of physical activity, and a LOT of trying to get you ready for your new military role. Is there yelling? Yes. Is there a lot of inspection and bed making? Yes. Is there goose poop? Oh Lord Yes. You can go online and read up about it at this link...Officer Training Command, Home of Navy OCS - ODS - Program Overview
    DO NOT go out of shape, and know that the RUN is the ONLY option for PRT while at ODS. No waivers are granted for this school and the PRT requirements.

    4. I urge you to think long and hard about what kind of career you want in Healthcare. If you want to be a Nurse, then go full force, all out, and when you get down the road there are lots of opportunities for NP and extra trainings on the active side. They are down the road though, and you have to be in it for a longer haul if you want the NC to pick up the tab. That said, if you want to be a PA, then do not be a nurse in the USN Nurse Corps. There will be no opportunity for you travel down that road short of doing your time and getting out to pursue it on your own. You also do not want to be unhappy, so if PA is your passion then focus on PA. If it something maybe for later you could do that, but there is no Nurse to PA route.

    5. Not that I know of. Prior existing relationship. You will NEVER be stationed in the same direct Chain of Command though, and if you are you better rectify it quick because if someone else catches the error you both will have a lot of questions to answer, and your career will suffer the most. This means you will not deploy together as this would be one of those instances, and if stationed at the same command it will be to different floors/units/directorates. I know he is reserve, but medical is much more likely to run into this than if it were a completely separate community. Just make sure everyone knows up front, and of course no kissing and canoodling while in uniform :-)

    Hope this at least starts to clear the water. Let me know if something is more muddy or if you have different questions. Good Luck!

    Ciao Ciao,

    LT, NC, USN
  13. Visit  TeleJenny profile page
    #11 0
    Thank you for taking the time to answer all of our questions, NavyNurseCorpsPM1,

    I have a few questions of my own as well. :-)

    Some background: I am a 31 yro new BSN RN graduate, fourth month into my first job as a telemetry nurse. Telemetry is not what I plan to do the rest of my life; I'd love to get into ICU and then become a CRNA. Talked to a recruiter in Jacksonville, FL when I was in school about the Nurse Candidate Program and since I was in an Accelerated BSN program that lasted one year I was told I wasn't eligible for participation in NCP. Thus, I set my sights on becoming a Navy Nurse through the Direct Accession route.

    1. Is there a specific amount of nursing experience needed to be considered or competitive for the Direct Accession program? One website I read said that the Reserves requires 3 years of experience, but I could not find any information pertaining to Active Duty experience requirements.

    2. I know that critical care, OR/periop and L&D were really needed when I last asked about what the Navy is seeking in DA nurses. Is this still true, and do I have a chance applying as a telemetry nurse?

    2. How difficult or competitive is it to get into the Direct Accession Program? And what must I possess or do to be considered a top candidate? (ie. GPA requirement, leadership activities, etc.)

    3. How difficult is it to gain employment as a Reserve Navy Nurse, compared to completing the Active Duty process? Do you know how many positions are open in either capacity (I'm not sure if I am eligible to apply for 2015 any longer, perhaps only 2016 at this point)?

    4. How difficult would it be to transfer from being a Reservist to Active Duty? I have heard from others on this site that it is next to impossible.

    5. Finally, I have a metal plate that was surgically attached to my right humerus as part of a fracture reduction surgery. The metal hardware has in no way affected my mobility or physical abilities in the 12 years that I have had it. Do you think this is something I can get a medical waiver for, or will this be looked upon as a disqualifying factor in my package?

    I appreciate you taking the time to read and answer my questions, LT. Thank you again!
  14. Visit  NavyNurseCorpsPM1 profile page
    #12 1
    Hello TeleJenny and I hope this finds you well. I have to be brief because I am studying for an exam at the moment, but I wanted to answer your questions as best I can. I will do so in order, and if it brings up new questions, please fire away!!

    1. No…you will get no credit towards rank until you work beyond the 6mo point and then we give 1/2 year for every year…they break it down into y/mo/day. Google the OPNAV 1120.7A as it is our current instruction and the breakdown is in it. Direct Accession requires no time…you will need to be credentialed, and you would be 1910 (MedSurg) as far as the Navy recognizes. If your goal is to apply this FY (FY15) that begins Oct 1, 2014, then your package needs to be fully complete by that first week in October. If not your best bet is going to be next FY (FY16). We take 1900 (Professional/brand new grad) and 1910 regularly, but the rest vary depending on the needs. I have no insight into that as of right now…it is above my head and I have no input into these numbers. When I do know I post it to the recruiters immediately so they know what to tell potential applicants.

    2. You do have a chance…sometimes it is better, sometimes it is not…it all depends on what the mix is that we need a the time, but you will not know if you do not apply and try.

    2b. (2 was listed twice) You must get your application in early, and you must fill it out completely and give us everything we ask for. Your personal statement should focus on why Navy AND why Navy Nurse…you become both and officer and a Nurse, not just one or the other, so tell me why you want to be both. Your GPA will help, but its the references and Interviews you will do that will really show us what others think of you both personally and professionally. It is a complete person concept, so you really want to emulate the whole package. Any recruiter can provide you with the checklist we use to help you in getting things together.

    3. Reserves is just as if not more competitive. The main difference is that in the Reserves you will stay in the area that you affiliate in. For you that would be Med Surg. We do not train you to become anything else as we rely on you to fill a Med Surg role if we need with little training because you should be working as one. FY16 is your only option for Med Surg Reserves at this time.

    4. You cannot do it. Contrary to what anyone else will tell you, I am being VERY CLEAR when I say…you either go Reserve or Active. We do not, at this time, nor in the foreseeable future have any availability to RECALL (the term used) a Reservist to permanent Active duty. If we were to ever exercise this option it will be directed through my shop and we only do it for something we deem critical. We tell EVERYONE who inquires about this that Reserve is not a way to go Active.

    5. N3M is our determining shop for all medical waivers. What will happen is that you will fill out a pre-screen questionnaire and then MEPS will need to see all of your documentation regarding the surgery and post-ops. I cannot say for sure one way or the other, but our medical team is phenomenal when deciphering what truly should or should not keep you from serving. The Navy follow the Manual of Medicine, so if they do tell you that it is not in your best interest, please believe that that is truly what they have in mind.

    Hope this helps for now…let me know what other issues I may have created or questions I may have brought up. Don't forget to Google the Instruction I mentioned, and have a wonderful and peaceful weekend.

    Ciao Ciao,

    LT, NC, USN

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