Male/NAVY/RN - page 2

Hello all, I'm 22yrs of age and going to school right now for my RN. I'm taking my pre-reqs and in the beginning of my educational path for my BSN. I still have a lot to go. Well over this past year... Read More

  1. by   gcollins83
    I'm in an interesting predicament and I thought this might be a good thread to add to. I graduated with a degree in biology a couple of years ago with the intent on pursuing med school (which waned upon reaching graduation, not from the interest in the field, but rather from the cost/time commitment necessary to attend). I'm currently looking at the military to give me a boost in a career and I'm interested in pursuing nursing. As of now, I would have to enlist (corpsman, so long as it's offered... I scored a 99 on the ASVAB, so I think it will be an option) and then compete for a position through the medical enlisted commissioning program. I'm a little uncertain as to how this might work since I have yet to take A&P and nutrition (I know I know, I was a microbiology nut, somehow I never took those classes, lol).

    So the nitty gritty, does anyone have experience with this sort of transition? Will I have the flexibility once enlisted to take the A&P courses necessary for enrollment? It also looks as if I will need to sign a commission for 6 years. I suppose that is about the time it will take to finish a regular enlistment plus using the GI Bill for a BSN anyway, but I feel that the experience I receive as a Navy Nurse may give me a bit more standing once I do decide to leave the service and pay a bit better while I'm in (and hopefully work as a traveling nurse).

    Any advice?

    Cheers,

    Greg
  2. by   SoldierNurse22
    An aside to the original poster--I would advise you on the strongest possible terms that you NOT join the Navy just for 30 days of leave, benefits, and the chance to travel. The military, especially in its current state, is not something you join so that you can have cool benefits and a flashy title in front of your name. Be prepared to deploy as a nurse and to put in your due time training like any other sailor. I can only speak from the Army side of the house, but joining the military just for the perks is a really bad idea, no matter what branch you go with.
    Best of luck in your decision-making process! Feel free to PM me if ya like.

    MJ
    2LT, ANC
  3. by   VentcSN
    If you are almost done with your prereqs just go for nursing school and apply for the Nurse Candidate Program. I graduate BSN this December 2011 and I am in the NCP scholarship. After reading all this comments from Navy Nurses, It made me want to be a Navy Nurse even more. First you must ask yourself if you want it. Go for it for the right reasons. Its hard work going through nursing school and trying to get into the Navy Nurse Corps. I am training myself now for ODS next year and also trying to finish up last semester of my BSN. I was pretty much in your shoes and I understand what your going through. I know the navy looks for motivated and strong individuals. If there is a will, there is a way. Goodluck to you and to your endeavors. I cant wait to graduate and pass my NCLEX but most of all, I cant wait to be a Navy nurse.
  4. by   jeckrn
    Quote from SoldierNurse22
    An aside to the original poster--I would advise you on the strongest possible terms that you NOT join the Navy just for 30 days of leave, benefits, and the chance to travel. The military, especially in its current state, is not something you join so that you can have cool benefits and a flashy title in front of your name. Be prepared to deploy as a nurse and to put in your due time training like any other sailor. I can only speak from the Army side of the house, but joining the military just for the perks is a really bad idea, no matter what branch you go with.
    Best of luck in your decision-making process! Feel free to PM me if ya like.

    MJ
    2LT, ANC
    Could not agree more. Your life will be miserable if these are the reasons you are joining. There is a reason why the military give these benefits and that is because of the whole package of being in the military.
  5. by   jeckrn
    Quote from gcollins83
    i'm in an interesting predicament and i thought this might be a good thread to add to. i graduated with a degree in biology a couple of years ago with the intent on pursuing med school (which waned upon reaching graduation, not from the interest in the field, but rather from the cost/time commitment necessary to attend). have you looked into a acelaraed bsn program.

    i'm currently looking at the military to give me a boost in a career and i'm interested in pursuing nursing. as of now, i would have to enlist (corpsman, so long as it's offered... i scored a 99 on the asvab, so i think it will be an option) and then compete for a position through the medical enlisted commissioning program. i'm a little uncertain as to how this might work since i have yet to take a&p and nutrition (i know i know, i was a microbiology nut, somehow i never took those classes, lol). since you will not know what command and where you will be stationed until you complete your training this is a hard question to answer.

    so the nitty gritty, does anyone have experience with this sort of transition? will i have the flexibility once enlisted to take the a&p courses necessary for enrollment? as above depends on what you end up doing and when you deploy.

    it also looks as if i will need to sign a commission for 6 years. not sure where you got this but all first time enlistments/commission's are for 8 years, all active or a companation of active & reserves.

    i suppose that is about the time it will take to finish a regular enlistment plus using the gi bill for a bsn anyway, but i feel that the experience i receive as a navy nurse may give me a bit more standing once i do decide to leave the service and pay a bit better while i'm in (and hopefully work as a traveling nurse).

    any advice?

    cheers,

    greg
    good luck but i would avoid the enlisted route, most services offer a loan repayment & accession bonuses for nurses. you need to check with a health care recruiter, not a enlisted one, to find out what they are offering at this time.
  6. by   allgod
    Quote from DanznRN
    MaleRNstudent21-

    Hello, my name is LT Dan D'Aurora and I have been a nurse in the Navy for 9+ years, I happen to be male. I personally disagree with the term "male nurse," I'm a nurse just like everyone else, again personal opinion. As for being anurse in the Navy goes, I love it and will continue to love it. If you have specific questions, please let me know. When I was in nursing school I worked every weekend as a nursing assistant, probably the best experience I ever had. I wish you good luck in what you are attempting to do, if I can be of any help please let me know.

    LCDR(s) Dan
    @DanznRN I just have a quick question, what are the chances of a new grad RN to being accepted into the nurse corp with the navy? What are the requirements for the new grad Rn? and how long is the process from applying to knowing the decision? thank you so much for your time.

    Corey
  7. by   Oldlove
    Hi there Corey,
    You asked about the chances of getting into the navy nurse corps. Look at it this way, not trying = zero percent chance. Generally though, the goal of the navy is to make sure they have a good mix of new grads and experienced nurses. However, experience is always a plus, so if you find yourself in a holding pattern, go for ICU/ER/MED-SURG, etc... Good luck.
  8. by   allgod
    @oldlove thank you for the info! =D

close