Life of a Military Nurse 2013

  1. 0
    Im a male student nurse graduating in Dec of 2015. Im curious to know what is life like as a military nurse?Hvae you ever had time to sightsee on your deployments? Have you had the chance to form bonds and meet people? (friends, potential mates ) lol

    Army Nurses- How long were your deployments for? Does the Army accept new nurses with no experience like the AF. If so in what specialty? Do they normally give you your choice of deployment location? How long is ypur first contract and how long does it take to be promoted?
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  3. 7 Comments so far...

  4. 3
    Sightsee on deployments? Are you kidding? If your deployment is at least a year you do get mid-tour leave, but I don't recommend touring Afghanistan. Army nurses typically deploy for nine months - no mid-tour leave for me, but I will happily trade the leave for the shorter deployment. This is no vacation.
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    Nothing is guaranteed in the Army or in any branch for that matter. If you go in, you go in to serve--leave your preferences at the front door. You will be put where you are needed and work where you are told, like it or not.

    There's a phrase you should get used to if you want to join: "Needs of the Army". The Army will put you where it needs you when it needs you there. You have very little say in the matter.

    That isn't to say you won't occasionally get what you'd like...for instance, a good assignment. However, that isn't something you should plan on.

    I have made some great friends. I have met some really not-so-pleasant people. Just like civilian side, it's a mixed bag. Unlike civilian side, you can't quit.

    Most branches are no longer accepting RNs without experience. If they do, it's rare and very strange. The application process is highly, highly competitive. You don't get accepted into a specialty as a new RN. If you get placed in one, you may not stay there. (reference: Needs of the Army).

    Choice of deployment location? Ha! That's a good one. Unless you're talking about assignment location, in which case they SHOULD give you one of your top 3 picks. But again, not guaranteed. (Please refer back to "Needs of the Army").

    Typically, the first contract is 8 years, 4 of them active and the last 4 either in the reserve or IRR.

    Promotion times vary. It's 18 months from 2LT to 1LT and variable from 1LT to CPT--average of about 36 months from what I understand. The promotion time is lengthening because we are overstrength, especially as we prepare to drawdown.

    Your pay will be a fixed salary that does not vary based on shift/holiday/night diff/etc. It is also noteworthy that you are looking at joining in a time where budget constraints and sequestration will be a real issue. If you aren't willing to work overtime (60+ hours/week) without any compensation, I strongly suggest you reconsider.
    Last edit by SoldierNurse22 on Jun 28, '13
    nurse2033 and miasmom like this.
  6. 1
    Choice of station? HaHa! I dreamed of Hawaii. Puerto Rico. Close to home at that time Fort Ord and Presido of San Franscio was open. Life long friendships yes. Hoping to get a mini reunion soon. Met my EX while stationed in Colorado. Find out on TV your going to Persian Gulf when was you be a civilian in a couple months, leaving Germany. See I wanted warm and tropical. Got cold and kept in for needs of the Army. Pray you get a good CO or one of you gets a PCS soon.
    Last edit by miasmom on Jun 30, '13 : Reason: typo
    SoldierNurse22 likes this.
  7. 0
    Quote from SoldierNurse22

    Most branches are no longer accepting RNs without experience. If they do, it's rare and very strange. The application process is highly, highly competitive. You don't get accepted into a specialty as a new RN. If you get placed in one, you may not stay there. (reference: Needs of the Army).
    .
    I just wanted to add that the Navy and AF are still accepting new graduate nurses. From everyone I've talked to, depending on the route you take, will determine how much of a chance you have being accepted into it. Army is the only branch I know of that has almost completely shut off new grads.
  8. 0
    Quote from RayJordan
    I just wanted to add that the Navy and AF are still accepting new graduate nurses. From everyone I've talked to, depending on the route you take, will determine how much of a chance you have being accepted into it. Army is the only branch I know of that has almost completely shut off new grads.
    Technically speaking, all branches "accept" new grads, to include the Army. There are various routes in, with ROTC being the most guaranteed (though not necessarily to active duty).

    It's still a matter of getting accepted in as a new grad, which is difficult no matter what route you take through any branch, Navy and AF included.
  9. 0
    It's super competitive right now but you're graduating in 2 years, who knows what it will be like then? It might not be as competitive for nurses in 2015/2016 because the civilian side is starting to pick up a little. At that point, the branches will no longer have their pick of only experienced nurses. You can also look in student programs, not sure if those are still around but they typically pay for the majority if not all of your tuition plus it's a guaranteed commission (assuming you graduate and pass NCLEX of course).

    I'm not sure what's happening on the regular Army side, but I know as of earlier this year the Army Reserves wanted 6 months of RN experience but the Guard accepts new grads (at least California does). This always changes though.
  10. 0
    According to my research and communication with AD recruiters, they are accepting very little nurses this FY and they want 2+years exp at least.


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