Is anyone an L.P.N. in the Army?

  1. 0 Hi, I was wondering if anyone was an L.P.N. in the Army? I want to know about Basic, the EMT Training now they are making people go through before they can go to the L.P.N. Program, and the L.P.N. Program.. Also, what's is it like being an L.P.N. in the Army?

    Thanks.
  2. Visit  wonder profile page

    About wonder

    Joined Jan '04; Posts: 9.

    56 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  BarbPick profile page
    0
    LPN's are technician level. Corpsmen.
  4. Visit  wonder profile page
    0
    Thanks, for replying. But, what do you mean by Corpsmen?
  5. Visit  BarbPick profile page
    0
    Like a nurse tech. Do basic patient care, draw labs, on a level of a non commissioned officer. Nurses are ususally Lieutenants and higher. Corpsmen are like EMT's in the trenches, or even parametics. They are usually called specialists.
  6. Visit  patrick T profile page
    1
    Because of the increased deployments and acuity of patients that medics have to work on in these areas, the army has increased the length of time it takes to be a medic. the AIT training at Fort Sam in Texas was increased by a couple of weeks and the lectures and the clinical labs are reflected also. In addition the Army combined the two MOSs of 91B medical specialist and 91C practical nurse in the new MOS 91w Healthcare Tech. The practical nursing program at Ft Sam is still open but now if you have a LPN/LVN license it you will still be considered a 91W with an additional skill Identifier.. Myself im sorta different though, I work in the army national guard as a 91W and i was on active duty as a medic also before i got into the Guards, but on the civillian side of the world i have my RN, BSN but i chose to stay enlisted. If you have any questions at all email me at Patrick1rn@aol.com I was active duty for 6 yrs and been in the reserves for 7 yrs so i know alittle about whats going on the military.,,

    Hope that helps

    Patrick thibeault RN, BSN
    newleaf2012 likes this.
  7. Visit  patrick T profile page
    0
    ok so you want to know about basic training.. Its a lot of fun, you get to learn how to be a soldier and you get to learn the basic fundamental skills of being a soldier like marching, doing alot of army workouts, alot of basic combat training skills with the basic weapon systems and alot of rifle marksmenship and alot of pushups. The drill Sgts will be in your face screaming at you breaking you down first till it hurts and after a couple of weeks they will build you up. You learn and learn and relearn all the basic common tasks that a new soldier needs to know in order to make it on the battlefield. Basic teaches the basics in other words

    91w school teaches the fundamental medical/trauma skills that a medic needs to know in order to treat patients on the battlefield and in the clinical setting. remember that it is a building block, if you have a good NCO Medic, he or she will improve upon your training as will a good MD or RN or PA...
  8. Visit  armygirl profile page
    0
    Hi,

    I am very curious as to why you decided to stay enlisted dispite having your BSN. It seems like it would be a lot better to become an officer as a Nurse. What am I missing?

    ArmyGirl

    Quote from patrick T
    Because of the increased deployments and acuity of patients that medics have to work on in these areas, the army has increased the length of time it takes to be a medic. the AIT training at Fort Sam in Texas was increased by a couple of weeks and the lectures and the clinical labs are reflected also. In addition the Army combined the two MOSs of 91B medical specialist and 91C practical nurse in the new MOS 91w Healthcare Tech. The practical nursing program at Ft Sam is still open but now if you have a LPN/LVN license it you will still be considered a 91W with an additional skill Identifier.. Myself im sorta different though, I work in the army national guard as a 91W and i was on active duty as a medic also before i got into the Guards, but on the civillian side of the world i have my RN, BSN but i chose to stay enlisted. If you have any questions at all email me at Patrick1rn@aol.com I was active duty for 6 yrs and been in the reserves for 7 yrs so i know alittle about whats going on the military.,,

    Hope that helps

    Patrick thibeault RN, BSN
  9. Visit  Jailhouse RN profile page
    3
    BarbPick, I hate to tell you that you have no clue what you are talking about. I was an LPN in the Army for ten years. An LPN in the US Army is designated as a 91C-20, 30 or 40. depending on the NCO grade. These NCOs have skills equal to or better than most civilian RNs (I am an RN). They also are responsible to have the training to set up a Batalian Aide Station and run it. This may have to be done in the heat of a firefight or during peace time. The 91C has many skills such as advanced triage, IV therapy, surgical assistant (first assist), assessment skills far beyond those of any civilian trained LPN, set up and maintain ventilators, ATLS, ACLS, PALS in some cases. The 91C is expected to be able to use these critical skills in any environment. All that besides having superior soldier skills. As with any branch of service you are a soldier first. Lastly a 91C NCOIC (Non-Comissioned Officer in Charge) you are expected to be able to teach any or all of your acquired skills. I personally taught trauma and triage. That is what it takes to be an LPN in todays Army. 91Cs ARE NOT NOR WERE THEY CORPSMEN. Calling a 91C a Corpsmen will really piss him / her off. Not that long ago their rank was not Sgt. but Warrent Officer, equal to any LT or Cpt. I hope this helps with any misunderstandings about an Army LPN.
    Last edit by Jailhouse RN on Apr 15, '04
    wejuststandhere, Mr_Tom, and Fiona59 like this.
  10. Visit  Amberf profile page
    0
    Quote from Jailhouse RN
    BarbPick, I hate to tell you that you have no clue what you are talking about. I was an LPN in the Army for ten years. An LPN in the US Army is designated as a 91C-20, 30 or 40. depending on the NCO grade. These NCOs have skills equal to or better than most civilian RNs (I am an RN). They also are responsible to have the training to set up a Batalian Aide Station and run it. This may have to be done in the heat of a firefight or during peace time. The 91C has many skills such as advanced triage, IV therapy, surgical assistant (first assist), assessment skills far beyond those of any civilian trained LPN, set up and maintain ventilators, ATLS, ACLS, PALS in some cases. The 91C is expected to be able to use these critical skills in any environment. All that besides having superior soldier skills. As with any branch of service you are a soldier first. Lastly a 91C NCOIC (Non-Comissioned Officer in Charge) you are expected to be able to teach any or all of your acquired skills. I personally taught trauma and triage. That is what it takes to be an LPN in todays Army. 91Cs ARE NOT NOR WERE THEY CORPSMEN. Calling a 91C a Corpsmen will really piss him / her off. Not that long ago their rank was not Sgt. but Warrent Officer, equal to any LT or Cpt. I hope this helps with any misunderstandings about an Army LPN.
    Actually, I just got out of the Army not too long ago. I was a 91B (medical specialist). At the time, there was a separation between 91B and 91C (LPN). However, as of mid-February 2001, they were indeed merged to the mos 91W. 91C's were converted to 91W and obtained an identifier. The 91W school is 10 weeks long after basic training, and trains a person to be an EMT with minor bedside nusing skills. You would become a 91W10 upon graduation, until the rank of E-5 (sergeant) at which point you would become 91W20 (this is the designation for any MOS as you gain rank.), E-6 91W30, so on and so forth. I would NOT enter the Army now as a 91W, but I know friends that have entered and received an identifer. However, even if you have the identifier, it's no guarantee that you'll enter a unit where you would have a good experience to put your Lpn skills to work.

    If you're looking to receive only LPN training, you may be better off looking into civilian schools. If you're looking for meaningful technical healthcare education in the military, I would advise looking into the Air Force. Not only do they have a healthcare tech program that is worthwhile, they have a better overall quality of life than the Army (my husband is Air Force). I've read (on these boards, actually) that after MOS graduation, you must complete two healthcare-related tests at your first duty assignment. This combined with (I think it's one year?) bedside patient care experience, allows you to challenge some state board exams for Lpn, such as California. I hope this helps, and best of luck to you.

    Edit
    As a side note, I continued with the Army reserves as a 91D, Surgical Technologist. In the military hospitals I've worked in, I've never heard of an Army LPN being allowed to first assist (though I have heard of them occasionally scrubbing in). Attaining first assist requires 1) Passing the CST (Certified Surg Tech) licensing exam, 2) Completing not only a certain amount of surgeries scrubbed in, but a high number of surgeries scrubbed in as first assist after you've passed the CST. 3) Passing the First Assist licensing exam. RN's are frequently sent through extra courses to become a scrub nurse, but even they require certification (and a great deal of knowledge on both ends about wound types/healing, sutures, A&P, surgical specialties, etc.)
    Last edit by Amberf on Apr 16, '04
  11. Visit  Amberf profile page
    0
    This was a double post
    Last edit by Amberf on Apr 16, '04 : Reason: Double post
  12. Visit  Jailhouse RN profile page
    0
    Amberf, What you say about the 91W is true. Shortly after I got out is when that happened. The LPNs (91Cs) took a big hit. As a 91C I set up and ran Batallion Aide stations. Had all the responsibility to deploy set up and run it. Assist in surgery, yes we did it all. I never worked in surgery in a real clinical setting and never would profess to know what you know about assisting let alone working in a clinical OR. I wish you much success in your chosen field. TY for th 91W update.
  13. Visit  Amberf profile page
    0
    Yeah, LPN's definitely took a huge hit. And it's sad to see, because on the wards/Aid Stations I've worked in, the lpn's that received training/licenses before 91W was implemented have been a major resource for pt care. A lot of times, I've noticed that the 91W just don't have the training/qualifications to operate on the same level that the 91C's did.

    And good luck to you as well
    Last edit by Amberf on Apr 25, '04
  14. Visit  bccunn profile page
    2
    well, i can see that there is as much confusion by others as there is by the recruiters. 91c did not merge with 91w; 91c is now the asi (army skill identifier) m6.



    what really changed for us...a lot of the ol' 91c's were able finally get promoted, but other than that nothing. supposedly, now that we are all 91w's, the mos takes precedence over the asi. you'll get different feelings on the merge, the fact still remains that when you call da for assignments, the first thing they say is, "aren't you a m6?"



    91w is a 16-week course, once you complete it you are cpr provider, an nremt, and a 91w; two certifications you can really use in the civilian sector or to moonlight in the military.



    if m6 is in your contract (again watch the recruiters, some are still under the misconception that 91w and m6 are the same), you will literally walk across the field to the phase 1 site of m6. incidentally, for all you old 91c's out there...the course now consists of 3 phases. so many m6's were completing the course but not getting their license that an extra month has been added during which the candidate goes through more nclex specific training and gets their license before hitting their next unit or returning to the reserve unit (we no longer take national guard either). m6 is a 52-week course with 8 weeks of spent at the only phase 1 site, ft. sam houston, texas.



    starting earlier this year the class iterations increased from 4 a year to 10 and soldiers no longer have a choice in the phase 2 site, all same-class graduates will go to one site.



    we still go to the field, set up depmeds (deployable hospital systems), and can be assigned to forward support battalions or to actual line units; it just depends on the demand. i personally know 5 m6's currently serving in iraq.



    incidentally, for a few years, california permitted military trained lpn's to challenge the rn board. for reasons i am unaware they discontinued that, but west virginia offers it also. the training that a military trained lpn receives exceeds that of our civilian counterparts, talk to some of them. we have delivered babies, started blood products, and pushed iv meds. the experience is unparalleled, and provides opportunities that should be considered. the average age of our students is about 20, but i can't even count the number of 17 and 18 year olds that have come through. can you imagine being an lpn at the age of 18? because we are the state of army, nremt now allows our 17 years to receive their nremt license, the nremt used to hold it until the soldiers 18th birthday.



    i am a 91w4hm6 - healthcare specialist (91w), sfc, instructor, licensed practical nurse. i have had a california rn license for about 4 years, and have about every certification that i could take time to go to. basic life support instructor trainer, nremt, phtls (pre-hospital trauma life support), nals (neonatal life support), acls (advance cardiac life support).

    [font='times new roman']i think i also saw a question in there asking why someone who is an rn would stay enlisted or come in enlisted versus being an officer. the answer is school loans, if a soldier with school loans comes in enlisted, uncle sam will pay off up to $60,000. in a class last cycle, i had an enlisted soldier who was a dvm. he came in for 4 or 6 years (can't recall which), uncle sam paid off all his school loans, he will get military and medical experience and leave the army debt free. later, after serving the time, if he wanted to stay in and transfer to the officer side, he could.

    [font='times new roman']there are great opportunities, but with it comes big demands. you can't go into nursing for the money, we have secretaries that are not required to save lives that make more than we do, you have to love working with people and the purpose for your skills. you gotta love it!
    wejuststandhere and Mr_Tom like this.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

Top
close
close