Deciding which branch to be a nurse for Deciding which branch to be a nurse for | allnurses

Deciding which branch to be a nurse for

  1. 0 I've decided to go to nursing school for a BSN and eventually specialize with a PMHNP. I really want to become a military nurse, but all the info I find seems very general. I'm hoping someone on here can help a guy out and answer some questions or point me in the right direction.

    What's the pay like for military nursing? I cant seem to find any info on this. It would be nice to understand the limits of ones future budget when deciding on a job.

    What's it like being a male nurse in the military? Are we still greatly out numbered, and does it really matter?

    How will being an active duty military nurse affect my wife and kids?

    Will it help pay for my grad level education?

    Would I be able to spend time deployed in an active war zone or near combat?

    Should I do ROTC while getting my BSN?

    Thanks to anyone who helps out!
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. Visit  jeckrn profile page
    #1 2
    First of all you are going to need to speak with a healthcare recruiter from each service to find the right fit for you. Do not speak to the local enlisted recruiter they will try to get you to enlist. If you do end up talking with one and they want you to take a placement test they are trying to recruit you. You can find the contact information for healthcare recruiters by going to their recruiting websites and look under officers/medical. Once you contact them it will take some time for them to get back to you.

    What's thepay like for military nursing?
    -Compared to civilian pay itdepends on where you live. In the military you receive base pay, BAH(housing) based on where you are station and BAS (food). BSH & BAS isnot taxed. You also do not have to pay for your or your families medicalinsurance or copays. Here is what a O-1, 2ndLT would be making at Fort Bragg area.
    Base pay $3034
    BAH with dependents $1248
    BAH without dependents $1122
    BAS $253

    This would give you a monthly pay of $,4409 to $4,535 or $52,908-$54,420 per year.

    I cant seem to find any info on this. It would be nice to understand the limitsof ones future budget when deciding on a job. -This is the official pay chart from DFAS (military pay) Military Pay Charts To find out what BAH would be they have a BAHcalculator.

    What's it like being a male nurse in the military- no different than anywhere else.

    Are we still greatly out numbered, and does it really matter?-NO & NO

    How will being an active duty military nurse affect my wife and kids- Depending on what service you join, specialty and where you arestationed can affect how often you are PCS'd(moved). In my last 7 yearsof service I moved 3 times. There is the chance you can stay at thesame base for 2 tours depending on what units are there.

    Will it help pay for my grad level education?- Yes, but you must apply for it. There is no guarantee. This would be your job during your time in school. They pay for book & tuition.

    Would I be able to spend time deployed in an active war zone or near combat?- Yes, right now the deployment schedule is low, but it can change atanytime.

    Should I do ROTC while getting my BSN- That depends on what service you want to join, your family life etc. Nursing school has lots of demands as does ROTC.
  4. Visit  jfratian profile page
    #2 0
    I would add that every active duty nurse is entitled to $4500 per year in tuition assistance. You can use this to go to school part time while serving. You can use this as soon as you get to your first base. The full time graduate education often requires 2 years at your first base and a lengthy, competitive application process.

    The benefit to ROTC is that it is a guarantee of being able to commission as a nurse upon graduation. Fewer new grads are being accepted as direct civilian accessions. If you don't do ROTC and your grades aren't top notch (3.7+), then you may have to get a few years of experience after graduation before joining.
  5. Visit  jeckrn profile page
    #3 0
    Right now in the Army there is no guarantee that a ROTC grad will get an active duty slot. TA does come with pay back time for officers.
  6. Visit  jfratian profile page
    #4 1
    The "2 years from end of last course taken" is a concurrent obligation that can be served alongside other obligations. The average person who signs a 4-year active duty deal basically gets 2 years of free money. I'm currently using tuition assistance and owe no extra time, since they have me until 2020 regardless.

    I don't know the Army or Navy, but the Air Force still gives all ROTC nursing grads an active duty guarantee. This underscores the importance of investigating your options in all 3 branches.
    Last edit by jfratian on Jan 8
  7. Visit  jknotts profile page
    #5 1
    My wife and I have been talking over possibilities of the different branches.

    I emailed my university's army ROTC department director whom pretty much said your too fat too old and why bothering with the nurses corps when you can work at a hospital. The too fat part is true, however I'm pretty sure the years while in college gives me plenty of time to get back in shape. My personality is such that I take this as challenge. This has done nothing to dissuade me. I'd already given myself a window of time before my morning classes to hit the school gym. Not that it counts now that I'm in my thirties, but I was an amateur strongman in my twenties.

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